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Not the biggest, or the last recall: U.S. Fines General Motors $35 Million for Lapses on Ignition-Switch Defect

Not the biggest, or the last recall: U.S. Fines General Motors $35 Million for Lapses on Ignition-Switch Defect | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Federal regulators report GM has agreed to change its internal review process after a flaw linked to 13 deaths and a vast recall.

   

Excerpts:

G.M. agreed to make “significant and wide-ranging internal changes to its review of safety-related issues in the United States, and to improve its ability to take into account the possible consequences of potential safety-related defects.”

      

The faulty ignition switch, in Chevrolet Cobalts, Saturn Ions and other cars, was prone to turn off if it was jostled or weighed down, shutting the engine, and disabling the air bags and power-assisted systems like steering and brakes. G.M. has linked the defect to 13 deaths and 32 crashes.

   


“...Today’s announcement puts all manufacturers on notice that they will be held accountable if they fail to quickly report and address safety-related defects,” Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx said.


Also, three (3) trust-related posts by Deb on REVELN:


Teamwork can also be the “secret sauce” that defines successful organizations.  Our systems for supporting high performance and leadership in teams and in entire organizations have not kept up with the times. 

     

Change Leaders: Why Should Anyone Trust Your Vision? John Kotter & Harvard Business Review

     

John Kotter’s highlights of some common assumptions about how leaders approach change.
    
Change, Ethics, Trust & Timing for your Talent Management Decisions

    

Hewitt's report features how plans on paper don’t translate to reality in the workplace when it comes to recruiting, developing and retaining talent.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

From the article and New York Times video:  There are 30,000 parts in the average car.  This GM problem was due to a 90 cent ignition switch.  The GM recall involved 2.6 million cars.   This recall doesn't even crack the top 10 in history.


_____________
    

The Ford Pinto was called, "the BBQ that seats 4."  

_____________


The Ford Pinto, a 1978 recall, is one of the best known, with a damaging brand impact lasting for years.  The Pinto was called, "the BBQ that seats 4."  Recently,Toyota, was lambasted for covering up a sticking accelerator pedal problem, featuring evidence of how they mislead the public and failed to report the problem in a timely way.


From the Times, "...As bad as they [the recalls] sound" and from me, the mistakes are varied and useful for understanding the complexities of big organizations.  That deaths occur is tragic, very tragic.  For this reason alone, it is yet another important cautionary tale about complex systems, yet simpler fixes:


1) clear the way to communicate with your customers and regulators,


and


2) don't mess around with anything that can damage public trust in your big business.   ~  Deb

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Trending Down for years: Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer

Trending Down for years:  Yahoo Investors Need to Worry About Marissa Mayer | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"By fighting trends, like telecommuting, Ms. Mayer's focus on tactics further damages Yahoo - which desperately needs a CEO with vision to create a new strategy."


Excerpts:


__________________

Yahoo has been a struggling company for several years
.

__________________


...Yahoo has lacked an effective strategy for a decade.  ..It has no technology advantage, no product advantage and no market advantage.  It is so weak in all markets that its only value has been as a second competitor that keeps the market leader from being attacked as a monopolist!


A series of CEOs have been unable to develop a new strategy for Yahoo to make it more like Amazon or Apple and less like – well, Yahoo. 


...Ms. Mayer was brought into the flailing company from Google, which is a market leader, to turn around Yahoo.  But she’s been on the job 7 months, and there still is no apparent strategy to return Yahoo to greatness.


Related posts by Deb:


     

   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yahoo's spotlight in the news seems to now be a cautionary tale about how not to change. 


Mayer's success at Google seems as if it is not translating into vision and right action (first steps), even after 7 months, at Yahoo.

Leadership IS about followers and inspiration to adapt.  Yahoo seems to have chosen conventional communication (email) as well as traditional management techniques in a company that seems more and more old school in adapting to change. 


If nothing else, Yahoo, note, the medium is the message, a quote from Marshall McLuhan.

~  Deb 

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Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience

Accessible Leadership: Why the CEO needs to drive communication & culture change to improve customer experience | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Leadership Required: Why the CEO needs to drive communication and culture change to improve customer experience.


A simple but not simplistic 3 point list of a leader's role in communicating with all hands in culture change. From Experience Required™


Excerpted:



The CEO’s role must be one of brand champion...[to] ensure that the company’s brand strategy is implemented, instead of becoming just another “thing” that everyone should do.


Here are three things leaders can start to do today to ensure greater success:


#1. Be visible.
Employees need to see you (literally) leading the effort ...[to] know that you truly believe in its value and its impact. Get out and develop relationships with your employees. ...[and] hear what’s really going on from those that directly interact with your customers.


#2. Give feedback regularly.
Recognize employees often with specific feedback on what they did well. Help them connect to the purpose and how their individual efforts fit in with the big picture.


Giving their work greater meaning helps them realize they’re working for a company they can be proud of. 


#3. Demonstrate quick wins.
Make it a point to regularly update employees on progress. Show them how their feedback led to actionable improvements in process, employee, and customer experiences.


You have to walk the talk and show you’re prepared to make changes that improve the experience. Once your employees realize their input is valued, they’ll open up more and be more motivated to follow your example.

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Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture

Russell Goldsmith of City National, on Storytelling’s Power in a Powerful, Positive Culture | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

The power of a story to teach, reinforce culture, and reward behavior, is central for how this bank executive leads at City National Bank in Los Angeles.


This reminds me of the power of the story by consulting colleague, Dr. Rick Fenwick, of Fenwick-Koller Associates.  We recently completed another round of Team Concept training for the UAW workers at GM Powertrain.  Our 4 day session is nuanced by story, Rick's colorful examples as well as stories shared by team members, learning about managing team experiences, including tools to help.


Goldsmith's example below embeds recognition and reward of the story into the culture of City National Bank.



Excerpt:

Russell Goldsmith is chairman and chief executive of City National Bank in Los Angeles. In its “Story Idol” competition, he says, employees talk about “what they did that promoted teamwork or helped a client by going the extra mile.”


_____________________________


We [taught] people how to share stories [including] something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition...

_____________________________



...we have a lot of great stories to tell. If you look up City National, one of the stories you will see is the story of Frank Sinatra’s son who was kidnapped. The first C.E.O., Al Hart, was a real friend of Frank Sinatra’s and famously opened the vault on a Saturday and got the ransom money. That happened in the early ’60s, but people are still telling that story. It’s a source of pride.


We brought in consultants to teach people how to share stories in a more organized way that underscored the culture. We do something called “Story Idol,” and every quarter there’s a competition among our 79 offices.


It’s a way to give colleagues a pat on the back and a moment in the sun for doing the right thing, and it democratizes and decentralizes positive reinforcement.


_____________________________


...what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.

_____________________________


The people who submit the winning stories [Story Idol competition] all get iPads. The winners themselves ...get significant cash awards. But what matters most is the recognition, and the respect from your peers as you stand on the stage in front of 300 people.


Read the full post via the New York Times by author ADAM BRYANT here.


===


Thanks to my change colleague, Liz Guthridge, @LizGuthridge, for the heads up. If you have a change leader that merits a look via this curation stream, let me know via DebNystrom@Reveln.com or suggest it as a curation post in ScoopIt.


More about us, on the Fenwick Koller Associates team with Reveln Consulting is here.

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Change Leadership: 9 Insights | Ecology of Education

Change Leadership: 9 Insights | Ecology of Education | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Summary:  From Michael Fullan’s session, Leadership for All, - The question:

 

What practices lead to effective leadership in change?

 

9 insights of leadership.

 

1. Relationships first (too fast/too slow): The art of change is hitting that sweet spot — don’t come in so fast that you put people off, nor so slow that you get absorbed by culture.

 

>> Careful entry to new setting

>> Listening to and learning from those who have been there longer

>> Engaging in fact finding and joint problem solving

>> Carefully (rather than rashly) diagnosing the situation

 

2. Honor the implementation dip

3. Beware of fat plans

4. Behaviors before beliefs

5. Communication during implementation is paramount  >> Pair-Share in meetings: generating ideas & problem solving.

 

6. Learn about implementation during implementation

 

7. Excitement prior to implementation is fragile

 

8. Take risks and learn

 

9. Its okay to be assertive

 

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First Ranking Of Top 30 CEOs On Social Media

First Ranking Of Top 30 CEOs On Social Media | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

This is the first global ranking of CEOs on social media - the pioneers and early adopters. Their impact is prompting other CEOs to rethink their position on social media.


The link includes a handy chart of the top social media savvy leaders including:


Rank, Twitter Username, Followers, LinkedIn Influencer followers, Klout Score, Number of Tweets and "Our Take (CEO of Xinfu, Host of BBC World of CEOs.com.)

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Included on the list:  

  • Rupert Murdock,  (media mogul)
  • Elon Musk (Tesla Motors CEO, also profiled in another of my ScoopIts regarding innovation & change) 
  • JeffImmelt, CEO of GE
  • Jack Welch (now at Jack Welch Management Institute), Angela Ahrendts, CEO of Burberry and 
  • Mark Bertolini, CEO of Aetna


 ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, July 20, 2013 1:59 PM

It will be interesting to see how this picture changes over the next year. While Richard Branson is currently the undisputed CEO social champion nothing lasts forever on social media. He has a loyal following but even he sees wildly varying engagement levels depending on the quality of what he posts.

Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 20, 2013 10:20 PM

Our goal was to combine the best of both approaches, taking into account both quantitative and qualitative measures to determine the top 30 CEOs on social media.

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Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally

Cultural awareness 80% of Change Management Success, Lean Change, Internationally | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Culture consciousness and people management present challenges greater than those related to cost trimming when implementing change, via Lebanese-born Dr. Joe Khoury.

  

Deep change expertise, communication & inclusion in goal achievement lean process is key to this review. ~  Deb

 

Excerpted:

 

__________________


...people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.


__________________

   

Dr. Khoury was one of three engineers lined up to relate success stories of lean principles’ implementation.


“Never underestimate the importance of culture,” Dr. Khoury cautioned.  "...Understanding your people will take you a long way towards reaching your lean goals.”


__________________

   

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner.

__________________

   

Dr. Khoury and others from the wider Methode family, including former manager Edward Chetcuti, now a lean adviser and coach, devised the VAVE (value added, value engineering) process to deliver value more efficiently.

 

The process was implemented successfully in China, where labor costs are traditionally lower, and later in the US.

 

The team also created customized software, able to provide a snapshot of the movements of major contributors to raw material cost. The software was later patented.

 

In Mr. Chetcuti earlier project, he examined behavior and processes and found that people were working 12- to 13-hour days unnecessarily – they were, after all, only paid for eight.

 

__________________


   

Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” ~ Antoine Bonello

 

_________________________

 

After classroom training & simulation, Mr Chetcuti and the team took the principles to the shopfloor. People learned to see waste and took ownership of the mission to reduce it and to get things right first time.

 

Through ...illustrating where teams were at in reaching their targets ...people were able to take corrective action sooner. Creative flow of value to the customer began soon after the company stabilised. Within eight months, profits improved significantly.

  
“Information must be cascaded so that everyone within the organisation is aware of the goals,” Betfair’s global head of process improvement Antoine Bonello, explained.

   

“We expect people to learn by themselves, but even in the best companies, employees can score very low on knowledge of what they are doing. Value engineering prevents mistakes from being replicated. ”

 

Read the full article here.

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The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue

The Hard Science of Teamwork, Teams that Click | HBR's April issue | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"We've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example."


It's the how, the what, not so much!


HBR has a new issue out this month, April 2012 on teams.  In my LinkedIn review of what's new, I see buzz about updates to the team models and traditions of the likes of Belbin, Tuckman, Gibb-Dannemiller and crew.


Excerpted from a pre-publication blog post by Alex "Sandy" Pentland:


"...I've encountered teams that are "clicking." I've experienced the "buzz" of a group that's blazing away with new ideas in a way that makes it seem they can read each others' minds."


____________________________


HOW we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions.

____________________________


MIT's Human Dynamics Laboratory used wearable electronic sensors to capture how people communicate in real time.  Not only did they determine the characteristics that make up great teams, but they also described those characteristics mathematically. 


What's more, we've discovered that some things matter much less than you may suspect when building a great team. Getting the smartest people, for example.


Our data show that great teams:


Communicate frequently. In a typical project team a dozen or so communication exchanges per working hour may turn out to be optimum; but more or less than that and team performance can decline.


Talk and listen in equal measure, equally among members. Lower performing teams have dominant members, teams within teams, and members who talk or listen but don't do both.


Engage in frequent informal communication. The best teams spend about half their time communicating outside of formal meetings or as "asides" during team meetings, and increasing opportunities for informal communication tends to increase team performance.


Explore for ideas and information outside the group. The best teams periodically connect with many different outside sources and bring what they learn back to the team.


You'll notice that none of the factors outlined above concern the substance of a team's communication. 


...According to our data, it's as true for humans as for bees: How we communicate turns out to be the most important predictor of team success, and as important as all other factors combined, including intelligence, personality, skill, and content of discussions. The old adage that it's not what you say, but how you say it, turns out to be mathematically correct.


Read the full blog post, The Hard Science of Teamwork, here.



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How Luther went Viral like Arab Spring: Message, Movement & Social Media

How Luther went Viral like Arab Spring: Message, Movement & Social Media | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Leader lessons from those who were too slow to adapt to new ways of sharing the message."


Higher education and churches are exemplars of slow change.  There are many examples of higher education disruption in this curation stream.  Here's the first church-based example with more to come.  The lessons apply to all change leaders, especially considering the pervasiveness of culture & belief in institutions of all types.



Excerpted:

 

Tom Standage of The Economist magazine wrote an article comparing the Protestant Reformation to the current use of social media in the Arab Spring.

 

Martin Luther, he says, was a relatively unknown cleric who took advantage of the hottest technology of 1517. He wrote short articles and theses, printed short and punchy pamphlets and also developed catchy hymns to pass his message along.

 

Tom points out three major ways that the Reformation-age use of printing parallels our own social media.

 

1) he connected directly with the everyman, writing in German, not Latin. He lead singing that stuck with people. He wrote short, non-theological works to make powerful points.

 

2)  When the church wanted to refute Luther, they wrote in Latin and attacked his theology. ...church leaders understood, but failed to capture the everyman...

 

3)  Finally, ...Martin Luther ultimately could not control his own message.   ...On the negative side, this lead to a bloody peasant's rebellion that Luther had to distance himself from. On the positive side, ...the Reformation was free to spread out of Germany and across the world.

 


Wednesday, 15 February 2012 

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