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Turning around the Philips top team with soft skills savvy | McKinsey

Turning around the Philips top team with soft skills savvy | McKinsey | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

A case study of change at Philips illustrates the importance of the “soft stuff.”

   

Pieter Nota: For [many] reasons, the [top] team was insecure and couldn’t understand why things were going so badly. The top-team survey we did in May 2011, in preparation for our first off-site meeting, exposed some of the challenges—...how misaligned we were on the direction of the business, the poor quality of our discussions, the lack of trust, the lack of confidence in our ability to implement strategy, and the perception that we were ineffective at making change happen.


________________________
   
...everyone got to the point where they could decide whether they wanted to be in or not...a pivotal moment.

________________________

      

     
The Quarterly: How and when did you go about starting to rebuild the team?
    
Pieter Nota: I...I think our first big off-site meeting—in May 2011, at Huizen, in the Netherlands—was significant. ...we put the issues on the table. Two things remain clearly etched in my memory.

    

  • One is a no-holds-barred conversation on team loyalty, which emphasized the importance of our values, our core purpose, and the essential notion of trust. 

      

  • The second is the introduction of some critical new thinking on how to improve the quality of our operations and implementation capabilities.

     
...I knew that I did not have all my team members on board and that this needed to be addressed. Even after my predecessor had gone, some who had been in his very close circle were continuing to have conversations with him. During the opening of the off-site meeting, this topic had already come up. We ended up spending three hours talking about the past, clearing the air, and gaining a better understanding of each other. At the end, everyone got to the point where they could decide whether they wanted to be in or not. That was a pivotal moment.
     

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Asking "what's working" and "what's not" is where it began.  This Phillips leader also knew how to communicate and prepare, including setting up an crucial off-site meeting to rebuild and renew the top leadership including a  'pivotal moment" of trust building and commitment among the top team's leader.  This gave them thinking time and space, "slow is fast" to allow them to let go of their legacy leadership and embrace the new strategy and vision, or choose to be somewhere else.
    
Soft skills are always a central part of change leader excellence.

~ Deb

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages | Change Thinking

The Classic Change Commitment Curve, Daryl Conner's 8 Stages  | Change Thinking | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Many imitators, one original (from the 80's.)


Daryl Conner's Change Commitment Curve has been copied in many places.  This post clarifies the orgins of this classic, and often copied, with a word tweak or two, model.


Another rendition of it is listed in this recent blog post focused on managing resistance via Daryl Conner's 1993 book:  Managing at the Speed of Change.


Daryl's research from long ago spotted consistent patterns.  His model highlights a fairly predictable path organization members must travel when managing their own anxiety around change.


This path typically moves along the timeline:

  • Uniformed Optimism (blissful ignorance)
  • Informed Pessimism (informed anguish)
  • Checking out
  • Overt (public)
  • Covert (private)
  • Hopeful Realism (coming to terms)
  • Informed Optimism (realistic support)
  • Completion



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