This Is Generation Flux: Meet The Pioneers Of The New (And Chaotic) Frontier Of Business | Fast Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

That Fast Company identifies GenFlux seems a is a renegade idea way disrupting traditional HR staffing / people concepts for organizations.  Think "churn" as a way of being.


"The future of business is pure chaos. ...So it seems...today.  GenFlux is a mind-set that embraces instability...even enjoys--recalibrating careers, business models, and assumptions."


A variety of careers & ages are profiled in Fast Co's piece.  I remember back when "white water change" and "pinch-points of change," were 90's terms tossed out while working on the latest reorganization, staffing change or technology installation, followed by the brand, is "you" in so many words.  


Excerpts:  


"There's a difference between the broadcast and networked worlds," danah boyd (lower case by intention) and Senior Researcher at Microsoft, says. "Command and control and hierarchical structures are being disintegrated. Big companies are trying to make that slow down. They have massive internal structural issues."


...From classrooms arranged in rows of seats to tenured professors, from the assembly line to the way we promote executives, we have been trained to expect an orderly life.


Thrivers are the members of Generation Flux, who are less a demographic designation than a psychographic one.  


GenFlux is a mind-set that embraces instability, that tolerates--and even enjoys--recalibrating careers, business models, and assumptions.  ...To be successful, businesses and individuals will have to work at it.


This is no simple task. The vast bulk of our institutions--educational, corporate, political--are not built for flux. Few traditional career tactics train us for an era where the most important skill is the ability to acquire new skills.


"I don't have any personal challenges about throwing away the past. If you're not changing, you're giving others a chance to catch up." ~  Pete Cashmore, founder of the widely popular, Mashable, with more than 2 million twitter followers