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Holacracy: not safe enough to try — Medium

Holacracy: not safe enough to try — Medium | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Holacracy exclusively focuses on internal processes and keeps the organization busy with organizing itself.

We completely got caught up with implementing and learning how to function in and operating with Holacracy. The system is ridiculously complicated without reason, and very challenging to learn.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A story about why holacracy did not work and may not be worth trying in your organization.

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Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year

Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It takes courage to listen. Whether it’s a first or fifth transition to a new leader role, these non-profit leadership lessons learned are timeless. Pause, reflect. choose, (from horse-guided leadership & learning.) In the first months, resist the urgent and not important to follow these practical steps to ensure your success.  

______________________
It takes courage to listen & learn, as a new leader.
_______________________

 

What I learned at the University of Michigan early on was the power of the conversation. Listening builds relationship. Listening well has impact as a leader with groups of new direct reports, with peers and colleagues, ALL of them await a new leader’s first steps and actions. Each. Encounter. Equals. Opportunity. To. Connect.

John Taylor, CEO of the Association of College Unions International (ACUI) had this to say about the series:
 

“As a new CEO, the article’s main points to invest time in learning, building relationships, and establishing priorities have been key during my first six months on the job.”  
 

I interviewed John before he left his role at the University of Michigan. His view is a fresh insight to help this year's new leaders.  Note that although we make reference to associations throughout the posts, these tips apply to any non-profit organization and are adaptable to the for-profit sector as well.

EXCERPTS from the full article derived from
  -- "Seven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job"

1. LISTEN to Learn

In many high-pressure environments, deep listening distinguishes the highly experienced from the amateurs. ...One association executive advised his peers to “resist the temptation to prove how bright you are; do nothing when you first arrive—just learn.”
   

...Develop a list for listening interviews including staff, board members, active volunteers, randomly selected members, dropped members, industry leaders, subject matter experts, external partners, and others. Everyone has something to say; they ...will be encouraged by your desire to learn. Ask open-ended questions. Prepare to be surprised. Though many relationships will deepen during your tenure, early conversations can provide unique opportunities for candid exchanges unencumbered by baggage, fears, or agendas.

 

2. COMMUNICATE!

...Information for your staff is usually under-communicated by a factor of four.
 

Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Staff members are vitally interested in what the boss [senior leadership team, executive committee, board] just talked about. Find a way to share it regularly.

    

  • The board should be vitally interested in progress toward strategic goals. Find a way to check on this.
   
  • Committees and other volunteer groups don’t know what other committees and groups are doing. Summarize, align, and share.
   
  • Members and constituents want to know “What’s in it for me?”  They will appreciate understanding the logic behind board decisions. Find a way to test, confirm and communicate this regularly. 
Read the full post on LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/courage-new-leaders-listen-learn-year-deb-nystrom 
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This article is useful for any non-profit leader in interim roles, as well as new leadership roles.  It's drawn from my work with new, on-boarding leaders in a large, complex, world-class non-profit, the University of Michigan, and my continuing work for my own company,REVELN Consulting, co-written with my colleagues, senior partners at Ideas for Action, LLCAlan Davis, my former client and friend, Jolene Knapp, who are both talented, highly experienced non-profit CEO's and leaders. I'm pleased to be sharing with you ourSeven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed the First Year on the Job".

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New Report: Strategic alliances, finding the "sweet spot" to deal with Higher Ed pressures

New Report: Strategic alliances, finding the "sweet spot" to deal with Higher Ed pressures | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Financial and demographic woes squeeze many institutions' bottom lines. But while predictions of mergers and consolidations proliferate, so too does evidence that combining colleges -- and even close collaboration -- is hard to pull off even when it seems to make good sense.

    

A new report from the TIAA-CREF Institute endorses the thesis that many higher education institutions will need to collaborate meaningfully to function well in the future, and that some of the traditional ways of working together -- like the many successful consortia that focus on joint services -- may not work for colleges that aren't close geographically or that seek more dramatic changes in their business models.


___________________________

   

...institutions should aim for ...a "sweet spot" ...flexible, sweeping, ...less threatening and risky than mergers...while retaining identities to h reduce costs and [raise] capacity...

___________________________

    

its author, Michael K. Thomas of the New England Board of Higher Education, also concedes that mergers are "challenging terrain" on which many would-be marriages can hit potholes -- or sinkholes.

     

Instead, the report argues that more institutions should aim for what Thomas calls a "sweet spot" that is more flexible and sweeping than most consortia but less threatening and risky than mergers: strategic alliances in which they merge some of their some administrative functions (while retaining their distinct identities and structures) to both reduce costs and give them more capacity than colleges would have on their own.


Read the full article here:  


Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

   

    
     
      
    


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The commentary on this piece is useful, highlighting patterns including dealing with: 1) issues of college identity, 2) alternatives to the full four years (dual credit options, community colleges, badges), and 3) entrenched administrative overhead dispassionately - as one of the fastest rising costs, as it affects careers, amidst education disruption and adaptation.

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Michigan Leadership: Dug Song, CEO & Duo Security assisting former ForeSee employees after layoffs

Michigan Leadership: Dug Song, CEO & Duo Security assisting former ForeSee employees after layoffs | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
In the wake of the second round of layoffs at Ann Arbor-based ForeSee, another local tech company is trying to help connect those now without jobs with companies looking for talent.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

These are Dug Song, ‪#‎leadership‬ lessons for ‪#‎Michigan‬ and any business in the area of layoffs.  Reaching out and helping the system of up and down business employment cycles, especially, as in the case of Duo Security, when your business is hiring when another is laying off, is simply good business smarts.  The way Duo Security is doing it is 21st century smart.  #HR #21stcentury #growth

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Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business?

Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
He made the stunning announcement on Tuesday during a press conference.


Blatter has been under fire since last week, when indictments for 14 people, including members of the FIFA executive committee, were handed out by the U.S. Department of Justice for charges of racketeering, money laundering, and bribery.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Including the previous post on the need to step back and pivot FIFA into a new era, this provides fresh opportunity to fix what's been broken for a long time.  The challenge is great, the rewards could also be great if successful change happens at all levels. ~  Deb

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Praise and Skepticism as Gravity Executive Sets Minimum Wage to $70,000 a Year

Praise and Skepticism as Gravity Executive Sets Minimum Wage to $70,000 a Year | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

While the overwhelming majority of the responses on social media and elsewhere were positive, there were also a number of people, [executives] who expressed doubts related to the nature of pay and compensation.

Excerpts:

 

Sandi Krakowski, an author and Facebook marketing expert, posted on Twitter: “His mind-set will hurt everyone in the end. He’s young. He has a good intent, but wrong method.”
    

Patrick R. Rogers, an associate professor of strategic management at the School of Business and Economics at North Carolina A&T State University, wrote in an email: “The sad thing is that Mr. Price probably thinks happy workers are productive workers. However, there’s just no evidence that this is true. So he’ll improve happiness, only in the short term, and will not improve productivity. Which doesn’t bode well for his long-term viability as a firm.”
     

Perhaps the most prominent attacker was Rush Limbaugh, the right-wing radio host, who labeled the move “pure, unadulterated socialism, which has never worked.”

    

Most critics were not as ideological as Mr. Limbaugh but were nevertheless put off by Mr. Price’s deviation from trusting in the market, both to set wages (his own as chief executive and that of his employees) and to maximize his own profits. Overpaying workers may make them lazy and is likely to inspire resentment among colleagues who once sat on the higher end of the pay divide, they warned.

During an interview with Mr. Price on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe,” the co-host Mika Brzezinski noted that people would probably say “you’re a terrible manager.”

Another guest, Sam Stein, an editor at The Huffington Post, was simply flummoxed. “Are you crazy?” he asked.

Maybe, Mr. Price conceded.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Originally I mentioned that this case would be a good test of Herzberg's theories about pay, satisfaction and productivity.  I posted later that I stood corrected, when I heard he was taking a pay cut of 90% to help fund the salary increases.  
      

On the one hand, he is a change leader because of the message he is sending about executive pay, and because of his boldness to be "crazy" and to experiment in this way.  On the other hand, it will be a good test of the limits of pay, and the theories and research that show that happiness and productivity are not necessary in the same room together.  Or perhaps they can be.  Check out a sample of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's slides I captured at his University of Michigan presentation this month.


Jonsson, CEO & co-founder of Jumpstarter describes Flow as

a state of mind where you are immensely focused and get things done. It is those precious moments when you are productive and ecstatic at the same time.  It is achieved by clearing the mind from the mind clutter. Mind clutter could be thoughts, feelings and impressions. Clearing it is achieved by actively working with accepting emotions, addressing problems when they arise and seeing things as they are.


”Flow-stoppers” are all those things that create mind clutter. It could be anything from deadlines to personal relationships to putting pressure on oneself to perform and do well.


Time will tell. He continues as a potential change leader, nonetheless for shaking things up.  ~  Deb

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Germany's Green Energy Is an Expensive Success

Germany's Green Energy Is an Expensive Success | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Germany's policy of switching to clean energy looks like a failure on the surface, but it has succeeded in changing people's thinking for the future.

...the policy's results show how a determined government can eventually shake up complacent oligopolies and point their thinking in a different direction.

   

The German government's subsidies to wind, solar and other renewable energy producers have grown to 20 billion euros per year (almost $26 billion at the current exchange rate) since 1991, when Germany first started the financial support. With that massive amount of aid, Germany overshot by three percentage points the European Union's 1997 goal of producing 12 percent of electricity from renewable sources by 2010. In the first quarter of 2014, Germany's electricity mix had a 27 percent renewable share.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Cheap, polluted. Clean, expensive. It's not that simple, yet in some ways, it is.  ~  Deb

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WinCo, ‘Walmart’s Worst Nightmare’ Is Expanding Massively

WinCo, ‘Walmart’s Worst Nightmare’ Is Expanding Massively | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Both Walmart and Costco have reputations for operating stores with minimal staffing—an obvious cost-saving tactic—and WinCo also tries to maximize efficiency in terms of hires and employee hours. While Walmart doesn’t have a particularly good reputation in terms of hourly wages or an ability to keep workers for the long haul, Costco is known to pay workers well, provide good benefits, and, by no coincidence, have great customer service thanks to the fact that employees who stick around for years and obviously want to keep their jobs. Likewise, few WinCo employees complain about their gigs. The company is employee owned, each owner (worker) is entitled to a pension, and health benefits are provided to anyone working at least 24 hours per week.


Related change posts by Deb:
 

      
   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Keep an eye on this company.  Let's see if they can make make it work with expansion.  As a "good business" company, it is encouraging if they can model sustainable livelihood for workers and including pensions and health benefits.

We needs more of these types of companies to turn the tide of increasing poverty in the USA.   ~  Deb 

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Pope Frances, Listed as #1 in Fortune's World's 50 Greatest Leaders

Pope Frances, Listed as #1 in Fortune's World's 50 Greatest Leaders | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

#1, Pope Francis has electrified the church and attracted legions of non-Catholic admirers by energetically setting a new direction. He has refused to occupy the palatial papal apartments, has washed the feet of a female Muslim prisoner, is driven around Rome in a Ford Focus, and famously asked "Who am I to judge?" with regard to the church's view of gay members.
     
He created a group of eight cardinals to advise him on reform, which a church historian calls the "most important step in the history of the church for the past 10 centuries."  ... S
gns of a "Francis effect" abound: In a poll in March, one in four Catholics said they'd increased their charitable giving to the poor this year. Of those, 77% said it was due in part to the Pope.

   

Others on the list, excerpted:

    
#2 Angela Merkel, 59, Chancellor, Germany, may be the most successful national leader in the world today. She is the leader of the European Union, which as a whole is the world's largest economy, and Merkel has held that position for almost nine years. She played the lead role in managing Europe's debt crisis, keeping the EU intact while setting even Greece on the road to recovery.

       

#3 Alan Mulally, 68, CEO, Ford Motor Co.  Ford's miracle worker saved the company without resorting to bankruptcy or bailouts by doing what previous leaders had tried and failed to do: change Ford's risk-averse, reality-denying, CYA-based culture. After earning $7.2 billion of profit last year -- far more than General Motors  GM -0.25%  or Chrysler -- the company paid its 47,000 UAW workers a record $8,800 each in profit sharing.

     

#4 Warren Buffett, 83, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway, leads 300,000 employees with a values-based, hands-off style that gives managers wide leeway and incentivizes them like owners. The result is America's fifth-most-valuable company.
   

Also on the list of 50:

Bill Clinton, 68, Founder, The Clinton Foundation
Aung San Suu Kyi, 68, Chair, National League for Democracy
Gen. Joe Dunford, 58, Commander, U.S. Forces, Afghanistan
Bono, 53,Lead singer, U2
Dalai Lama, 78, Spiritual leader of the Tibetan people
Jeff Bezos, 50, CEO, Amazon.com

 

         

Related change posts by Deb:

              

                              

                 

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The full list of 50 is worth a review even though it came out this past March.  Most of these change leaders will stand the test of time. As of November 2014, the #1 spot of Argentine Pope Frances, who exemplifies change leadership, with influence far beyond several billions of Catholics worldwide.  Ex-Catholics, if it were a denomination, would be the third largest group, and yet his message carries further to so many more of the world's citizens.
     
My half Argentine heritage speaks  to one thing I know of many Argentines, including Pope Frances ~ they are challengers.

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KSU prez gives up $90K of his own salary to give lowest-paid employees a raise

KSU prez gives up $90K of his own salary to give lowest-paid employees a raise | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
"This is not a publicity stunt," he said. "You don't give up $90,000 for publicity. I did this for the people. This is something I've been thinking about from the very beginning."


The raise in pay for those employees will stay in place even after a new president is selected, he said. It will be the rate for all new hires as well. The change is immediate.


His salary, originally $349,869, is now $259,745.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The lead line for the article is, "Now this is leadership."  Perhaps the difference in his before and after salary, and his prior role with GE have inspired him to make an example that may inspire others.


When is a certain level of salary, house, home and possessions enough - so that those with wealth share it with those who struggle to make ends meet?


It reminds me of the video circulating about the homeless sharing their food and money that has been given to them recently, while the average American does not share when asked by someone for food or money.  ~  D

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Tech experts offer to replace Detroit firefighters pop can alert system

Tech experts offer to replace Detroit firefighters pop can alert system | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Bye bye pop can. That's what the Detroit Fire Department might soon be saying soon to its rigged-up emergency alert system, which could get replaced — for free — by one of several philanthropic software companies who recently learned just how bad things are in Detroit.
   

For Deputy Fire Commissioner John Berlin, the offers to help have been humbling. Calls have come in from as far away as California and Oregon.

     

“It overwhelmed me,” Berlin said of the outpouring of support. “We need so much. ... What I was humbled by was that there was nothing negative said about the city of Detroit, or the bankruptcy. It was simply that they wanted to help. And that set me back a little bit. It humbled me.”

    

.....Detroit firefighter Paul Fillmore said technological upgrades are long overdue. He noted that the department once had a code red system that automatically rang the fire bell at the stations, but it’s been decades since that’s been in place. Instead, firefighters are improvising with pop cans.

       

.....Berlin said for now, fire officials are still gathering information from the interested parties who want to help. He said he wants to make sure that a company’s donation is used to its fullest potential.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

               

        

      

     

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Great for Detroit!  One of several companies that are doing well financially offers to helps Detroit get back on its feet by updating Detroit's decrepit firefighter's internal emergency alert system.
    

It's good they found a low-cost solution initially with a non-existent Detroit tech-upgrade budget.  It's also good to know more are reaching out to help, as well as helping their own visibility for the work they do.  ~  Deb

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Classic: What is success? Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum

Classic:  What is success?  Do You Have the Will to Lead and Answer the Toughest Questions? - Peter Koestenbaum | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Philosopher Peter Koestenbaum poses the truly big questions: How do we act when risks seem overwhelming? What does it mean to be a successful human being?

___________________

   

How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

___________________

       

{Have you asked yourself:]  How in the world did I get here? Or wrestled with ...strategic choices -- all of which seem hard and unpleasant -- and said, What happened to the fun part of being in business? According to Peter Koestenbaum, those uncomfortable questions -- those existential quandaries -- are at the root of issues that great leaders deal with all the time, and they influence every decision that must be made.
  
More than 25 years ago, Koestenbaum traded the cloistered halls of academia for the front lines of the global economy. It's not unheard-of for this philosopher, a tireless 71-year-old with thick glasses and a flowing beard, to visit clients across three continents in a single week. His agenda: to apply the power of philosophy to the big question of the day -- how to reconcile the often-brutal realities of business with basic human values -- and to create a new language of effective leadership. ...The more you understand the human condition, the more effective you are as a businessperson. Human depth makes business sense."

     

___________________

   


Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. 

___________________

   

Koestenbaum's wisdom makes sense to leaders at such giant organizations as Ford, EDS, Citibank, Xerox, Ericsson, and even one of Korea's chaebols. ... At Ford, Koestenbaum contributed to the company's 2,000-person Senior Executive Program throughout the 1980s. In more than a decade at EDS, he led seminars and coached hundreds of top executives, including then-chairman Les Alberthal. 


"Everything I do," says Koestenbaum, "is about using themes from the history of thought to rescue people who are stuck." His logic: Change -- true, lasting, deep-seated change -- is the business world's biggest and most persistent challenge. But too many people and too many companies approach change by treating it as a technical challenge rather than by developing authentic answers to basic questions about business life. 


WHY DOES BEING A LEADER FEEL SO HARD TODAY?

Because reckoning with freedom is always hard ...We're living in a peculiar time: It's marked by a soaring stock market, the creation of tremendous wealth, an explosion in innovation, and the acute alienation that occurs when the global economy hits the average individual. 

The message is, You're living in the best country in the world at the best time in history; you have an amazing degree of freedom to do what you want, along with an unprecedented opportunity to build immense wealth and success -- and to do it more quickly than ever before. Of course, the average individual has as much of a chance of launching a skyrocketing IPO as he or she has of becoming a movie star. 

       
________________________________
     
There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. ...There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change.

________________________________

       

What's even more disturbing is that the ascendancy of shareholder value as the dominant driving force in business has resulted in a terrible insensitivity to basic human values. 

THAT'S A HEAVY BURDEN TO PLACE ON LEADERS. THEY MUST NOT ONLY GUIDE ORGANIZATIONS BUT ALSO WRESTLE WITH BASIC PHILOSOPHICAL QUESTIONS.


There's a terrible defect at the core of how we think about people and organizations today. There is little or no tolerance for the kinds of character-building conversations that pave the way for meaningful change. The average person is...riveted by the objective domain...where our metrics are; that's where we look for solutions. ...That's why books and magazines that have numbers in their titles sell so well.


We'll do anything to avoid facing the basic, underlying questions: How do we make truly difficult choices? How do we act when the risks seem overwhelming? How can we muster the guts to burn our bridges and to create a condition of no return?

     

___________________

   

...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. 
___________________


There's nothing wrong with all of those technical solutions. They're excellent; they're creative; they're even necessary. But they shield us from the real issues: What kind of life do I want to lead? What is my destiny? How much evil am I willing to tolerate?

      

...Managing polarity teaches us that there are no solutions -- there are only changes of attitude. When you grapple with polarities in your life, you lose your arrogant, self-indulgent illusions, and you realize that the joke is on you. To get that message makes you a more credible human being -- instantly. 

===
As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full version of the Scooped post.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

    

         

    

          

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

          

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've recently learned that this classic article is the most downloaded article from Fast Company.  If you read it, you'll see why.  It asks the beautiful, and extraordinarily difficult questions about business and life. Changing perspective, and ultimately changing attitudes, is the big challenge in making lasting change fully sustainable.~  D

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Doing Well by Doing Good: Michigan's Fave Food Brand Converts $50 Mil Business Into Worker-Owned Co-Op

Doing Well by Doing Good: Michigan's Fave Food Brand Converts $50 Mil Business Into Worker-Owned Co-Op | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
Zingerman's Community of Businesses is a staple of Ann Arbor, and it's achieved great success through highly unorthodox practices.


The flagship deli, founded in 1982, is now just one of nine businesses in the Zingerman's Community of Businesses, which also includes a bakery, creamery, candy company, and restaurant.


These businesses are founded on a unique philosophy without traditional business hierarchy.  Zingerman's emphasize collective decision-making.  [Now] ...the company is on track to make $50 million this fiscal year.


A worker co-op is an old business model that has seen renewed interest post-recession due to a lack of investors creating jobs in communities.


Zingerman's has been focused on getting its employees to think like owners long before hard economic times.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Employees who think as owners?   What a concept - that's been around for ages, just not implemented widely.  Here's why it is working, from the article:

   

  • Open-book management:  even the lowest-level employee will work better if they know how the company is doing financially and should have a stake in its success.
        
  • Weinzweig and the 17 other partners, who act as managers, want to find a way to get employees involved in the consensus, rather than just sitting in to ask questions and offer insight. ....Essentially, that could give someone like [a] new part-time employee as much voting power as the CEO.
        
  • Weinzweig thinks that traditionally managed organizations, in which executives operate in a different sphere from their employees, "are operating with about 5% of their intellectual and creative capital, which really doesn't make sense."
    
It's a competitive, global world now, and traditional management, born out of the wide open markets of the industrial age, are no longer as competitive without the insights of all stakeholders, especially staff / employees.
    
~  Deb
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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, June 20, 2014 7:33 PM

As I commented originally on Change Leadership Watch:  Employees who think as owners?   What a concept - that's been around for ages, just not implemented widely.  Here's why it is working, from the article:

   

  • Open-book management:  even the lowest-level employee will work better if they know how the company is doing financially and should have a stake in its success.
        
  • Weinzweig and the 17 other partners, who act as managers, want to find a way to get employees involved in the consensus, rather than just sitting in to ask questions and offer insight. ....Essentially, that could give someone like [a] new part-time employee as much voting power as the CEO.
        
  • Weinzweig thinks that traditionally managed organizations, in which executives operate in a different sphere from their employees, "are operating with about 5% of their intellectual and creative capital, which really doesn't make sense."
    
It's a competitive, global world now, and traditional management, born out of the wide open markets of the industrial age, are no longer competitive without the insights of all stakeholders, especially staff / employees.
    
~  Deb
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Nonprofit Leader Partnerships: How to Achieve the Right Balance

Nonprofit Leader Partnerships: How to Achieve the Right Balance | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Like a well-played symphony, when nonprofit leaders partner well with their staff and volunteers, magic happens.  Leadership & Partnership in the nonprofit sector:"

_________________________


Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. 

_________________________
 

In this Part Two post from  “Seven Ways New Non-Profit Leaders Succeed The First Year on the Job," – co-authored with Jolene Knapp and Alan Davis, another Ideas for Action, LLC colleague, we offer solutions for nurturing a successful partnership.  Part One of the series recommended first steps of CEO listening and communicating with the specific titles of:


  1. Listen to learn
  2. Communicate, and communicate again

Below, we share details and links to resources on setting the leadership agenda as well as finding your rhythm with a new board chair or council president, as well as educating and encouraging volunteers.
 

_________________________

Co-creation is a powerful way to establish partnership.
_________________________

3. Set a Leadership Agenda

When things go wrong between CEOs and their boards, it’s often the result of a failure to reach a common understanding of what constitutes success. Co-create the new leadership agenda. One of the best tools we’ve seen is a simple but powerful template for articulating priorities and goals for the next 18 months, including the respective roles of the new leader, board, and senior staff in achieving them.   (See the Sample Leadership Agenda in this article from the Bridgespan Group.)


Do not overcommit yourself or your staff. Leaders, members, and other stakeholders are excited about a new CEO; they want projects or tasks implemented that may have been pending for a while or they have new ideas.


Establish a pattern of having strategic conversations with the board that set clear expectations about goals, roles, and ways to assess progress. In addition, it is important to assure that the chair/president is passing along information to the rest of the board.
 

4.  Establish a Rhythm for Building Shared Leadership with the Board Chair

In the complex world of governance, it’s important to find a communication pattern that builds solid leadership connection in your organization. One CEO we consulted said that in preparation for each new governance year, she facilitated an off-site leadership transition retreat with the incoming president, immediate past president, and new president-elect. (This will vary with the size and culture of your board.) In a private and relaxed setting, the goal was to orient the president-elect to current challenges, provide deep background on strategic priorities, and co-create a shared leadership vision for the year.


Related posts by Deb on Non-Profit Leadership in this series:

    

Courage for New Leaders To Listen & Learn in the New Year

  


Related posts by Deb on Strategy and Change:

   

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. In fact, it’s a challenge not only for brand new CEOs, but for seasoned CEOs whenever newly elected leaders take office.  


In working with my friend and colleague Jolene Knapp, for example, I learned about how she needed to become acquainted with a new board president EVERY YEAR, in her role as an Executive Director.  This added pressure to her role, and it also developed her agility in building new leader partnerships. It is from this perspective we share our insights in this blog series for nonprofit leaders.


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Manish Puranik's curator insight, January 11, 2016 11:55 PM

'Listen to Learn' and 'Communicate, and communicate again' would prove the simplest mantra of this age, if used appropriately! 

Jaro Berce's curator insight, March 2, 2016 6:07 AM

Shared leadership can catch new leaders off guard. In fact, it’s a challenge not only for brand new CEOs, but for seasoned CEOs whenever newly elected leaders take office.  


In working with my friend and colleague Jolene Knapp, for example, I learned about how she needed to become acquainted with a new board president EVERY YEAR, in her role as an Executive Director.  This added pressure to her role, and it also developed her agility in building new leader partnerships. It is from this perspective we share our insights in this blog series for nonprofit leaders.


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Insight into Taxes & Charity: How Mark Zuckerberg’s Altruism Helps Himself

Insight into Taxes & Charity: How Mark Zuckerberg’s Altruism Helps Himself | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Mark Zuckerberg did not donate $45 billion to charity. You may have heard that, but that was wrong.  Here’s what happened instead: Mr. Zuckerberg created an investment vehicle.


Excepts:


Mr. Zuckerberg didn’t create [US] tax laws and cannot be criticized for minimizing his tax bills. If he had created a foundation, he would have accrued similar tax benefits. But what this means is that he amassed one of the greatest fortunes in the world — and is likely never to pay any taxes on it. Any time a superwealthy plutocrat makes a charitable donation, the public ought to be reminded that this is how our tax system works. The superwealthy buy great public relations and adulation for donations that minimize their taxes.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Things are not always as they seems in philanthropy among the top 1%.  It's important to look into the story to understand what that means to our government systems and how it impacts us. ~  Deb

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Why we cannot learn a damn thing from Semco, or Toyota: Flip YOURself Into Change

Why we cannot learn a damn thing from Semco, or Toyota: Flip YOURself Into Change | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"The world of the pioneers really exists."  Why burning the books, until you believe YOU can be a part of it, is key.


Excerpt:  


....Sure, people feel somewhat “inspired” and “motivated” when hearing about the amazing things that happen at Valve, Zappos, Netflix, MorningStar, Favi or DaVita. And when they learn about how much management stuff they might previously have considered inevitable simply doesn’t exist within those pioneer organizations.

    

Why has almost nobody dared to follow in their footsteps? 

    

Ricardo Semler, owner and visionary of the trail-blazing “democratic” Brazilian company Semco got so frustrated about [almost] nobody following the example set by his company …that he took every book [he’d written] at his home, all translations, into the garden – and set them ablaze.

    
We remind ourselves that they are somehow not from this world. They stake out land that appears unknown and foreign to us. “That would never work for us here,” we say. “We’re just not ready for that.” Or “I could never swing that with my team.” and “We went to visit them and had a look; it sure was fascinating, but their approach is just not right for us.” How often have I heard those kinds of comments. The most horrific quote of all being: “It’s a long, long road to really get there.”
     

___________________________
   
Our organizations can be flipped into that land of milk and honey, within the twinkling of an eye...
   
 ___________________________


For a long time, this seemed to be a contradiction to me. On the one hand, the world of the pioneers really exists – like some continent of copious vegetation. In most people’s perception, however, there seems to be no way of entering that secret garden. That land of milk and honey remains out of reach, and foreign, too. In the meanwhile, pioneers like Toyota, Gore, Sweden´s Handelsbanken or Germany´s dm-drogerie markt keep telling us that there is, really, nothing magic about what they are doing!
     
Because we can all beam ourselves there. Our organizations can be flipped into that land of milk and honey, within the twinkling of an eye, as soon we all stop thinking about other people as “Xers”. We do not need more examples for this, we need to correct our thinking. As for Semco, Toyota and the likes: Their example remains noteworthy and potentially inspiring for all of us.  

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Niels has it. The mythology of the "long road to get us there" distinguishes limited thinking mindsets from the visionaries around and about our companies who change things and make things happen.  Are you one of them?  Can you be?  Are you ready to flip the switch in your own mind?  ~  Deb

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Elect a Hairless Bear? Five Leadership Problems That Brought on the FIFA Disaster

Elect a Hairless Bear? Five Leadership Problems That Brought on the FIFA Disaster | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

With nine FIFA executives under arrest, the organization that manages the World Cup [is] a poster child for governance gone wrong.


____________________________
 
Sepp Blatter is ...expected to win re-election, ...though a hairless bear would do less damage as president.”  

~ by Satirist John Oliver. HBO's Last Week Tonight,  this segment received 10 million YouTube views

____________________________
  

A brief synopsis of the 5 leadership lessons:
   

1. A HISTORY OF ETHICAL LAPSES
A pair of World Cups—planned for Russia in 2018 and Qatar in 2022— have allegations of bribery tied to the bidding process for each event.
     

2. RESISTANCE TO TRANSPARENCY
On occasions when corruption charges were investigated, FIFA worked to avoid public reporting and chose not to release reports in their original forms.
       

3. DEEP CULTURAL PROBLEMS
In one example, Michael J. Garcia, a former U.S. attorney for New York’s Southern District, claimed that a colleague on the Ethics Committee, Hans-Joachim Eckert, had misrepresented his report in a summary Eckert wrote that effectively cleared the way for the World Cups in Qatar and Russia to proceed.

     

4. FAILURE TO CHANGE
Two outside organizations produced change reports in 2011 and 2012, offering dozens of suggestions as to how to FIFA could solve its governance problems. However, few of these ideas have been implemented. 

      

5. LACK OF PUBLIC SUPPORT
“The crazy thing is, Sepp Blatter is widely expected to win re-election, [and he did] even though a hairless bear would do less damage as president,” satirist John Oliver said on his HBO program, Last Week Tonight, in a segment that has received more than 10 million views on YouTube.

    

As with all ScoopIt articles, click on the title or photo to see the full, original article.


Related articles in this series of three:

 Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES.
   

Sepp Blatter steps down as president of FIFA. What's next for FIFA, the business?

    

4 Leadership Lessons from Horse-Guided Coaching (Reveln)



 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The president of FIFA has now resigned, after running for reelection in spite of the negative press and widely reported problems that happened during his leadership.  Do these 5 leadership problems resonate with what you know to be true about FIFA?  

Is it time to elect the hairless bear?  (See item 5 in the synopsis.) ~  Deb

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After Arrests, Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES.

After Arrests, Can FIFA Be Fixed? Jean Frankel at Ideas for Action says YES. | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

“…With the problems [it] faces, and with a recently reelected leader who seems unable to accept responsibility, is FIFA…worth being saved?”
 

...the U.S. Department of Justice unsealed its 47-count indictment against those individuals has focused on how FIFA’s governance structure—which gives its 209 member-nations and each one’s soccer association equal voting rights—made it susceptible to widespread wrongdoing.
    
_________________________________
   
…change, for FIFA, has more to do with accountability and culture …[What are] the shared set of values that [transcend] all of those cultural differences?” ~ Jean Frankel

_________________________________
   
     
So with all of the problems it faces, and with a recently reelected leader who seems unable to accept responsibility, is FIFA an organization capable of, or even worth, being saved?

Jean Frankel, president of Ideas for Action, LLC, certainly thinks so.

“Organizations like these do have a place, and they’re essential in the grand scheme of things,” she said. “World football is the biggest sport on earth, so you need a governing body of this large sport. You need somebody to set the rules, promote the sport, and do all of those positive things.”

_________________________________


Here’s an organization that represents more than 200 different countries, which means more than 200 different cultures. 

_________________________________

Frankel, who recently helped the NCAA navigate a massive governance overhaul, said she sees a number of similarities between the two organizations.
   
“People asked that question of the NCAA: Do we need them? Can’t the [collegiate athletics] conferences just govern themselves?” she said. “Of course, the answer to that was ‘no.’ The conferences can’t govern themselves, because you need to have one place where a consensus has to be reached, where governance and oversight can happen.”

A fix for FIFA could even borrow from the model the NCAA ultimately landed on, said Frankel, which included weighted voting.

“It worked for the NCAA, because it was the closest thing that you could have to some kind of level playing field,” she said. “Large conferences in the NCAA and large countries in the soccer world have more resources and more to gain and lose.”

....But change, for FIFA, has more to do with accountability and culture than anything, explained Frankel.  ....Here’s an organization that represents more than 200 different countries, which means more than 200 different cultures. 


Read more about Jean Frankel, the NCAA governance story, and the Ideas for Action group here.  Full disclosure below.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Jean's comments indicate a positive organizational scholarship informed vision of change, how deeply flawed organizations can use their flaws as a pivot point to get back on the straight and narrow.  The article, available in full here, highlights what worked for the NCAA in turning their organization around.
   
_______________________________

Tensions ran high enough that the largest schools began to consider the possibility of breaking away to form their own organization.  

_______________________________

      

Excerpt:  Think it’s hard for your board to work effectively? Try doing so while under constant scrutiny from the public and media—and even congress. That’s exactly what the NCAA, college sports’ governing body, faced as it restructured its governance model..

I believe this could be either a great example of large scale system positive change or of failure.  This is based on knowing the NCAA story of how governance can be fixed, of how to lead change based in what's NOT working, how how those exact dysfunctional aspects of an organization can be the basis for renewal and rebirth, of being made new again.   Full disclosure, I've joined the Ideas for Action group this spring, because of Jean and because of the bench strength of the organization.

 

 

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CEO cuts his own pay by 90% to give every employee a huge pay rise

CEO cuts his own pay by 90% to give every employee a huge pay rise | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
A chief executive has announced plans to raise the salary of every single employee at his company to at least $70,000 (£47,000) – and will fund it by cutting his own salary by 90 per cent.

     

Mr Price, 30, has gone one step further, after telling ABC News he thought CEO pay was “way out of whack”.
    

In order not to bankrupt the business, those on less than $70,000 now will receive a $5,000-per-year pay increase or an immediate minimum of $50,000, whichever is greater.
    

A spokesperson for the company said the average salary was currently $48,000, and the measure will see pay increase for about 70 members of staff.

    

...

“My pay is based on market rates and what it would take to replace me, and because of this growing inequality as a CEO that amount is really high. I make a crazy amount.
     

The New York Times, which was invited along for the Wolf of Wall Street-esque announcement, reported that after the cheering died down Mr Price shouted: “Is anyone else freaking out right now?”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Now here's a guy who's sending out a big message about executive compensation, along with wage fairness.  This is beyond the thoughts I had shared about wage / pay and motivation, a 'la Frederik Herzberg.   ~  Deb

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Chipotle Leadership Looks Within, Using Generation Flux's Secret Weapon

Chipotle Leadership Looks Within, Using Generation Flux's Secret Weapon | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Chipotle has distinguished itself from the Burger Kings and McDonald's of this world by relying on "naturally raised" meat that is antibiotic- and hormone-free, by dropping trans fats from its cooking before doing so was in vogue, and by offering organically certified beans and avocados. ...Other chains reheat frozen items in a mechanized system. At Chipotle, Ells points out, "we're actually cooking. If you walk into the refrigerator, you'll see fresh onions and peppers and raw meat that isn't tenderized or treated in any way."

Excerpted:   That mission drives Chipotle's sales and marketing..  When Chipotle's ad agencies couldn't find a way to make "food with integrity" a compelling sales proposition, Ells dumped them and brought marketing in-house. Now the company is winning industry awards, and building valuable customer loyalty, through campaigns such as The Scarecrow. The online video and game about farmers and fresh food has become a best seller on the App Store, downloaded nearly 700,000 times [and]  has fueled Chipotle's growth. The company now has some 1,700 stores, up from 1,350 two years ago; revenue is $3.6 billion, up more than $1 billion over the same time; and Chipotle's market cap doubled to a whopping $21 billion.

   

Steve Ells and Chipotle are hardly alone in embracing what Ells calls a "loftier" vision for the enterprise. "...another renegade CEO declared... his frame for decision making was moral: "We do things because they're just and right." This emphasis on social goals over financial performance seems almost revolutionary—and yet the renegade is none other than Tim Cook of Apple, CEO of the most valuable company in the world.
 

[As for]... Generation Flux, [they are the] people best positioned to thrive in today's era of high-velocity change. Fluxers are defined not by their chronological age but by their willingness and ability to adapt, ...defining where business and culture are moving. ...Purpose is at the heart of their actions... [not] social service. ...Mission..allows them to filter the modern barrage of stimuli, to motivate and engage those around them, and to find new and innovative ways to solve the world's problems. ….Businesses that find and then live by their mission often discover that it becomes their greatest competitive advantage.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Purpose and Generation Flux are central concepts to values centered, purpose driven and highly successful companies and more companies, who have this at their core as they grow, are finding success.  Those who do not will not be able to change or adapt to it later.    ~  D

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Turning around the Philips top team with soft skills savvy | McKinsey

Turning around the Philips top team with soft skills savvy | McKinsey | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

A case study of change at Philips illustrates the importance of the “soft stuff.”

   

Pieter Nota: For [many] reasons, the [top] team was insecure and couldn’t understand why things were going so badly. The top-team survey we did in May 2011, in preparation for our first off-site meeting, exposed some of the challenges—...how misaligned we were on the direction of the business, the poor quality of our discussions, the lack of trust, the lack of confidence in our ability to implement strategy, and the perception that we were ineffective at making change happen.


________________________
   
...everyone got to the point where they could decide whether they wanted to be in or not...a pivotal moment.

________________________

      

     
The Quarterly: How and when did you go about starting to rebuild the team?
    
Pieter Nota: I...I think our first big off-site meeting—in May 2011, at Huizen, in the Netherlands—was significant. ...we put the issues on the table. Two things remain clearly etched in my memory.

    

  • One is a no-holds-barred conversation on team loyalty, which emphasized the importance of our values, our core purpose, and the essential notion of trust. 

      

  • The second is the introduction of some critical new thinking on how to improve the quality of our operations and implementation capabilities.

     
...I knew that I did not have all my team members on board and that this needed to be addressed. Even after my predecessor had gone, some who had been in his very close circle were continuing to have conversations with him. During the opening of the off-site meeting, this topic had already come up. We ended up spending three hours talking about the past, clearing the air, and gaining a better understanding of each other. At the end, everyone got to the point where they could decide whether they wanted to be in or not. That was a pivotal moment.
     

Related change posts by Deb:

                                                   

    

     

         
  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  9 multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here,via REVELN Tools.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Asking "what's working" and "what's not" is where it began.  This Phillips leader also knew how to communicate and prepare, including setting up an crucial off-site meeting to rebuild and renew the top leadership including a  'pivotal moment" of trust building and commitment among the top team's leader.  This gave them thinking time and space, "slow is fast" to allow them to let go of their legacy leadership and embrace the new strategy and vision, or choose to be somewhere else.
    
Soft skills are always a central part of change leader excellence.

~ Deb

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Regal Wisdom: After 80, some people don’t retire. They reign

Regal Wisdom: After 80, some people don’t retire. They reign | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Photo: Carl Reiner, actor, 92, at his home in Beverly Hills

   

Excerpts:

The portraits here are of men and women in their 80s and 90s, rich in the rewards of substantial and celebrated careers… Why do they persist, the old masters? …The short answer: “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” ~ Dr. Samuel Johnson

    

Examples:

      

Edward O. Wilson, naturalist and author, 85

  

NYT: You are the world’s foremost expert on ants, and now you’re asking about the meaning of human existence and the future of humanity. Has growing older pushed you to these bigger questions?

    

EW: I couldn’t have asked these questions before. I was too engaged in the hands-on research, especially in the field.

     

NYT: So how has age contributed to your more recent books?

I think age contributed a great deal to [his] recent trilogy of books. First because I feel I have enough experience to join those who are addressing big questions. Second …I was astonished at how little this was being done. I’ve come to appreciate that we’re wrecking the planet… The public response …[has] been unacceptably weak.

       

Ginette Bedard, long-distance runner, 81, Howard Beach, Queens.

Bedard will run in her 12th consecutive New York City Marathon this year.

     

NYT: You ran your first marathon at age 69. How did you do?

    

GB: I came in second in my age group, I think 65 to 69, and the next year I came in first. And I think I was 72 when I beat the world record for my age group, 3:46 or :45.

     

Carl Reiner, actor, 92, Beverly Hills, Calif.

Reiner published his second memoir, ‘‘I Just Remembered,’’ this year.

    

NYT: Has the process of writing for you changed?

      

CR: It has not changed. I still only write from the gut, I can only write about what I know. The only thing I research is if I’m writing about someone I don’t know. Thank God for Google. Otherwise I go by the seat of my pants

   

Roy Haynes, jazz drummer and bandleader, 89, Long Island. Haynes’s latest album was ‘‘Roy-Alty,’’ released in 2011.

    

NYT:  You travel a lot, and it sounds as if you have no intention of slowing down.

     

RH:  I’ve been traveling since 1945. …drumming’s just a continuous way of life. And it’s still going on. I’ve been doing this longer than I’ve been doing anything else.

    

NYT:  What keeps you going?

   

RH:  You get to be this age, you think you know a little more about life. With my traveling around, it’s quite exciting, and I’m sure it keeps me young. A lot of the people I play with are much younger than me. Young enough to be my children or my grandchildren. People say I look young. The average person if they asked how old I was wouldn’t expect me to be the age I am.

          

NYT:  But how do you maintain your stamina?

        

RH:  I don’t know. If I knew, I’d just write a book on that and forget playing drums. I’d become richer.

      

Related posts by Deb:

     

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work   

    

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

     

 Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

    

• Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

           

As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.

     

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Learning from our elders, vibrant and accomplished, is a good way of also preparing for the future.  It is notable that the arts are well represented here, and in that, art is life.  ~  Deb

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The Ways Big Cities Think and Successfully DO Large-Scale Change

The Ways Big Cities Think and Successfully DO Large-Scale Change | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Change on a grand scale ... is hard, but it’s not impossible."   Living Cities, a long-standing collaborative of 22 of the world’s leading foundations and financial institutions, created the Integration Initiative to accelerate the pace of change in U.S. cities.

     

We worked with five cities tackling seemingly intractable challenges such as urban revitalization in Detroit and education and health in Newark.
       

Get the right players to the table.    ...We asked cities to start from the results that they wanted to achieve, and then to determine who needed to be at the table in order to achieve them. Often, this meant bringing people together who were not used to working together.

     

We saw the greatest success when ….strong chairs who had credibility in multiple sectors, were willing to push the group to prioritize, and were committed to changing how their own institutions worked in order to push others to do the same. …achieving their goals required significant behavior change from multiple players who didn’t necessarily see themselves as part of the same systems even though they served largely the same families and neighborhoods. 

       

For example, …a school superintendent and the head of a community development bank …both play an important role in connecting underserved communities to jobs and essential services such as education, training, child care, health care and housing, and ensuring that those opportunities exist in the first place.

      

Also:    Reimagine roles.    …challenge long-held orthodoxies that can limit progress….

         

Build, measure, learn, and declare.     …The most successful cities have adopted a lean “build, measure, learn” approach. They use data to measure, in real time, whether their indicators are trending up, learn whether their approaches are working and then stay or change course as needed.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

From the article, "Large scale change takes on new meaning when it involves large cities and "bringing people together who were not used to working together."   Yep.  The article highlights new  perspectives by those who find they are serving "largely the same families and neighborhoods."  
          
Via  these two cities, there are some additional lessons learned:

       

Detroit & Vegas – A Tale of Two Cities as Our Comeback Kids


~  Deb   

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Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket

Workers fight for culture, wages and win: Demoulas, reinstated as CEO, Market Basket | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Boston Herald: TEWKSBURY, MA — Arthur T. Demoulas was reinstated as CEO late last night after a two-month standoff over his firing that saw rank-and-file workers walk off their jobs and customers jump to competitors in protest — thanked his workers this morning, hours after his historic purchase of the company.

   

______________

  

“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life.” ~ Arthur T. Demoulas, reinstated CEO, Market Basket

______________

      


"You are simply the best,” Demoulas said …There is very little I can ever add to your brilliant work…and the power of your enduring human spirit over the past six weeks.”

    

Early this morning, a massive fleet of delivery trucks lined up ready to roll and hundreds of ecstatic employees reported to work for the first time in weeks....heralding the return of a boss they said had provided generous pay and benefits and a culture of respect for workers.


“You taught everybody that Market Basket is a place where respect, honor and dignity is a way of life,” Demoulas told his workers. “You displayed your unwavering dedication and desire to protect the culture of your company...You have demonstrated that everyone has a purpose....that no one person holds a position of privilege.”

   

The chain employs 25,000 workers in Massachusetts, Maine and New Hampshire.  [It was worth] $4 billion before Arthur T.’s June 18 firing touched off a customer boycott and employee walkouts.  [It] racked up millions in losses and shelves were left empty due to a halted supply chain.

   

Demoulas said he hopes to take less than two weeks getting shelves restocked and stores back to some semblance of normalcy.


Click the title or photo to see the full story.

    

Related posts by Deb:

    

Revelation, Leadership Integrity at All Levels

    

Company Priorities Reveal People Values and Forecast Long Term Profitability

      

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals

    

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

   

  • Stay in touch with the monthly Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  multi-gold award winning curation streams.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

        

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:49 PM

I haven't heard of a worker celebration like this since Henry Ford doubled wages and in effect, created middle class prosperity. Maybe more companies will take notice of employee ownership successes like these, also like Costco and Zingerman's in Ann Arbor.

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Transform from Industrial Age Design: BetaCodex - Turn Your Company Outside-In!

How to build a devolved cell structured organization and leave the old, slow and bureaucratic structures behind.

As always in our ScoopIt news, click on the photo, video or title to see the full Scooped post.

       

Related tools & posts by Deb:

         

                

          

     

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Beta Codex network has the thinking and design that will help us finally leave old command and control structures, individualistic thinking behind.  Scientific management had its day, back in the 1950's in wide open economic markets.  In competitive, global, digitally powered, high speed markets, hierarchy is so last century.   It's time to change to agile, cellular design that is as adaptable as the next mobile phone operating system.  ~  Deb 

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