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Dampening High-Tech Dynamism Demonstrates Need to Reignite Entrepreneurial Economy | Kauffman.org

Dampening High-Tech Dynamism Demonstrates Need to Reignite Entrepreneurial Economy | Kauffman.org | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
A new white paper from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation shows sustained declines in business dynamism across a wide swath of the U.S. economy, including the high-tech sector that has been critical for sparking economic growth in recent decades.

   

Click here to open a window to access the report.

    

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This post features the Kaufman report and ties into the previous ScoopIt by one of its co-authors explaining dynamism and its impact on the economy.  ~  D

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Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company

Givers take all: The hidden dimension of corporate culture | McKinsey & Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it
By encouraging employees to both seek and provide help, rewarding givers, and screening out takers, companies can reap significant and lasting benefits. A McKinsey Quarterly article.


After the tragic events of 9/11, a team of Harvard psychologists quietly “invaded” the US intelligence system. The team, led by Richard Hackman, wanted to determine what makes intelligence units effective. By surveying, interviewing, and observing hundreds of analysts across 64 different intelligence groups, the researchers ranked those units from best to worst.



[They discovered], after parsing the data, that the most important factor wasn’t on their list.


The single strongest predictor of group effectiveness was the amount of help that analysts gave to each other.


Evidence from studies led by Indiana University’s Philip Podsakoff demonstrates that the frequency with which employees help one another predicts

  • sales revenues in pharmaceutical units and retail stores;
  • profits, costs, and customer service in banks;
  • creativity in consulting and engineering firms;
  • productivity in paper mills;
  • and revenues, operating efficiency, customer satisfaction, and performance quality in restaurants.


See the related post by Deb:


   


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a brilliant work by Adam Grant that may be part of the answer to the fragile nature of systems in organizations.  

Givers, Matchers (predominate in most organizations, think "silos") and Takers are key terms to understand why some cultures are high performance and others struggle just to be average.  Takers may also describe those leaders and cultures that eventually become a casuality of the normal organizational decline.  ~  Deb

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John Michel's curator insight, June 13, 2013 4:40 PM

When it comes to giver cultures, the role-modeling lesson here is a powerful one: if you want it, go and give it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, June 13, 2013 5:10 PM
Thanks John! So evidently true. Now if we can only fully implement it!
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High-Tech Sector is Losing its Dynamism, Affects Job Creation > Kaufman Report 2014

High-Tech Sector is Losing its Dynamism, Affects Job Creation > Kaufman Report 2014 | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Surprising news:  New firms account for a smaller share of the tech sector than in previous decades. > HBR Blog & a recent Kaufman report.


____________________________
   
....the pace of job creation has been on a persistent decline. 

     

____________________________

        

America’s high-tech sector has become less dynamic and less entrepreneurial in the last decade via  a recent Kauffman Foundation report writer Ian Hathaway co-authored.


...The high-tech sector is experiencing a consolidation of activity away from young firms into more mature ones, and the pace of job creation has been on a persistent decline. ....high-tech companies have been well-represented among the fastest growing firms in the past few years, the high-tech sector–like the rest of the economy–is less dynamic overall.



____________________________
     
....Business dynamism involves...new and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones.

   
____________________________
   


...Business dynamism involves measuring ...businesses ...being formed, growing, shrinking, and closing....churning: jobs are created while others are destroyed, and some workers move into new roles as others seek to replace them. New and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones.


...Entrepreneurs also play an outsized role in new job creation. While older and larger firms account for the substantial majority of employment levels, new and growing young firms drive net new job creation overall.


....Research has firmly established that this process of “creative destruction” fuels productivity growth, making it indispensable to our sustained economic prosperity. ...a more dynamic economy is a key to higher growth.


Read the full blog post here


Photo credit, thenext28days on Flickr, ccc.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The business dynamism or creative dynamism of which Ian Hathaway speaks seems has a kinship to Anti-Fragile concepts, especially, how  "new and superior ideas replace existing and inferior ones, while more productive firms usurp less productive ones."  ~  D

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What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation

What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"What Nassim Taleb misses about technology and innovation is that its purpose is not to entertain the delicate tastes of the chattering classes, but to improve the lives of us all.  ...What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones."


Excerpts: The Usefulness Of Useless Things


What Mr. Taleb fails to understand is that technologists are supremely aware that most of their efforts will come to nothing


_________________________



What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?  

_________________________



...They are, in fact, searching out black swans (to use Mr. Taleb’s own parlance), in full knowledge that they will spend most of their time rushing up blind alleys.  


What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?

The truth is that useless things often end up very useful indeed.  Modern information technology did not originate with engineers, but has its roots in an obscure academic crisis, whose major figures, such as Cantor, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Gödel and others never dreamed that their work would have important practical consequences.


...What Mr. Taleb seems to miss is that these are ...people dedicated to following their dreams and willing to put their own skin in the game to do so.


What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones. 

As [Greg Satell] recently wrote in the Harvard Business Review, “Innovation is a particularly sticky problem because it so often remains undefined.”  You can’t simply focus on the technologies that are sure bets, but must take into account the entire matrix (pictured in the article, four quadrants.)

 

... the logical consequence of his argument) is that we should remain in the upper right quadrant, where both the problem and the domain are well defined and he would presumably assign the lowest value on basic research and disruptive innovation, which have no clear applicability.


Yet it is there that we break truly new ground.


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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    This is a follow-up on the "Anti-Fragile" post below.  The author discusses failure is an important part of the process leading to success, as author Greg Satell explains via the nature of innovation.  


    This seems to be a worthy new perspective and critique of Taleb's work, also listed in our Innovation and Institutions curation stream.  ~  Deb

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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 28, 2013 11:25 AM

    I've shared news about Taleb's perspective on Change Leadership Watch. It's now paired with this innovation perspective about the place of failure! a compelling view.  ~ D

    Bill LeGray's comment, April 29, 2013 11:26 AM
    Good thoughts verey deeply buried within the Social Media mileau. BUT not so deep I will not try to follow the Change Leadership Watch, and other excellent Forums provided by Scoop It. In fact, while quite broad, the entire Innovatioon and Institutions stream may be worth a look now and then. Deb; "Thanks for leading the way for creativity, process changes, and obtaining "better" innovations and institutions with more properly responsive institutional outcomes."
    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 30, 2013 3:37 PM
    Thanks for the comment Bill. Best to you.