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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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3 Long-Lasting Sustainable Companies Teach How To Both Thrive And Give Back

3 Long-Lasting Sustainable Companies Teach How To Both Thrive And Give Back | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Inspiring Rockstars of the new economy ~ companies which inspire us with their ability to make money while making a difference, as well as their high growth and high impact."


Operating from 25 to nearly 225 years, these companies have maintained their commitment to mission through up and down business cycles, continued to create high-quality jobs and to improve the quality of life in our communities, and paved the way for today’s growing group of green, responsible, and sustainable businesses.


1) Sun Light and Power, founded in 1976,  has been providing renewable energy and energy efficiency technology to California homeowners and businesses throughout on-again, off-again government support for solar.

  • SLP has also remained devoted to its employees and the community and became a B Corp in 2009. 
  • Rather than subcontracting installations (a common industry practice), the company hires full-time employees and provides a living wage, health benefits, a retirement plan, and paid time off.


2) Seventh Generation founded in 1988,  is one of the nation’s most recognized brands of natural household and personal care products.  

  • The company has also grown its high-quality job base, doubling the size of its team to 113 in 2011.
  • All of Seventh Generation’s products, raw materials, byproducts, and processes are sustainable.

3)  King Arthur Flour, after nearly 225 years in business, their secret is: focusing on employees.
  • They began as a family-owned business before transitioning towards an employee-ownership model in 1996 and finally becoming 100% employee owned and thriving.
  • Aan employee-owned B Corp, KAF has the freedom to emphasize values beyond profit, like environmental responsibility, community engagement, and the wellness and satisfaction of employees. 
  • More than 80% of health care premiums are paid for families and both full- and part-time employees receive a living wage.

What are the priorities of your company?  One of Deb's recent posts:
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Sustainable businesses that are thriving are great role models for us all.  Sharing the examples thanks to B Lab and Fast Company's co-create listings.  ~  Deb

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Ian Berry's curator insight, January 7, 2015 4:43 PM

"The ability to live their values at work is the secret to King Arthur Flour’s longevity and success." Key to a company thats been successful for 225 years. Should be a sign for us all!

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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J.C. Penny update: Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure?

J.C. Penny update:  Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It is less about how fast CEOs are willing to move than how quickly their most reliable customers are prepared to change.

   

Ron Johnson's bold overhaul of the sagging American retailing icon J.C. Penny went too far too fast.


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Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.


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 When "reckless" moves succeed, they're retrospectively rebranded as "bold." When "timidity" triumphs, it's celebrated as "patient" and "safe."

  

Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

  

How fast are your customers willing to change?

 

Your own rate of change is determined less by the quality or price/performance of your offerings than the measurable readiness of your customers and clients.

  

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Electrolux's  70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.


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Their internal readiness matters more than yours. Their inertia matters more than your momentum.

  

Electrolux, has implemented a new "70% rule" for testing its new product innovations to make sure it's not getting too far ahead or falling too quickly behind either its customers or competitors.

 

Electrolux CEO Keith McLoughlin has declared that new product prototypes have to enjoy at least a 70% customer preference rate in blind competition with best-selling rival products. "

 

Speed to market" isn't what's driving the change.

 

The goal is assuring that the firm's ability to innovate is effectively aligned with the customers' willingness to value them. The 70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's alluring, thinking it is about getting the amount of change just right.  Wrong focus.  It is about where and who the customers area, and how adaptable and ready they are for change.


On the individual level, it's also about preferences for change.  The assessment tool, iWam (the Inventory for Work Attitude and Motivation) has a "clock" feature that shows individual preferences for change.  

As goes the individual, probably so goes the customer culture, witness the articles overview of the tech market and the appliances market.  ~ D

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