Change Leadership Watch
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Regal Wisdom: After 80, some people don’t retire. They reign

Regal Wisdom: After 80, some people don’t retire. They reign | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Photo: Carl Reiner, actor, 92, at his home in Beverly Hills

   

Excerpts:

The portraits here are of men and women in their 80s and 90s, rich in the rewards of substantial and celebrated careers… Why do they persist, the old masters? …The short answer: “Depend upon it, sir, when a man knows he is to be hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind wonderfully.” ~ Dr. Samuel Johnson

    

Examples:

      

Edward O. Wilson, naturalist and author, 85

  

NYT: You are the world’s foremost expert on ants, and now you’re asking about the meaning of human existence and the future of humanity. Has growing older pushed you to these bigger questions?

    

EW: I couldn’t have asked these questions before. I was too engaged in the hands-on research, especially in the field.

     

NYT: So how has age contributed to your more recent books?

I think age contributed a great deal to [his] recent trilogy of books. First because I feel I have enough experience to join those who are addressing big questions. Second …I was astonished at how little this was being done. I’ve come to appreciate that we’re wrecking the planet… The public response …[has] been unacceptably weak.

       

Ginette Bedard, long-distance runner, 81, Howard Beach, Queens.

Bedard will run in her 12th consecutive New York City Marathon this year.

     

NYT: You ran your first marathon at age 69. How did you do?

    

GB: I came in second in my age group, I think 65 to 69, and the next year I came in first. And I think I was 72 when I beat the world record for my age group, 3:46 or :45.

     

Carl Reiner, actor, 92, Beverly Hills, Calif.

Reiner published his second memoir, ‘‘I Just Remembered,’’ this year.

    

NYT: Has the process of writing for you changed?

      

CR: It has not changed. I still only write from the gut, I can only write about what I know. The only thing I research is if I’m writing about someone I don’t know. Thank God for Google. Otherwise I go by the seat of my pants

   

Roy Haynes, jazz drummer and bandleader, 89, Long Island. Haynes’s latest album was ‘‘Roy-Alty,’’ released in 2011.

    

NYT:  You travel a lot, and it sounds as if you have no intention of slowing down.

     

RH:  I’ve been traveling since 1945. …drumming’s just a continuous way of life. And it’s still going on. I’ve been doing this longer than I’ve been doing anything else.

    

NYT:  What keeps you going?

   

RH:  You get to be this age, you think you know a little more about life. With my traveling around, it’s quite exciting, and I’m sure it keeps me young. A lot of the people I play with are much younger than me. Young enough to be my children or my grandchildren. People say I look young. The average person if they asked how old I was wouldn’t expect me to be the age I am.

          

NYT:  But how do you maintain your stamina?

        

RH:  I don’t know. If I knew, I’d just write a book on that and forget playing drums. I’d become richer.

      

Related posts by Deb:

     

Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work   

    

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

     

 Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!

    

• Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

           

As always in REVELN ScoopIt news, click on the photo to see the full post.

     

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Learning from our elders, vibrant and accomplished, is a good way of also preparing for the future.  It is notable that the arts are well represented here, and in that, art is life.  ~  Deb

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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

__________________

    

...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

__________________


...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes, this fits what I've been tracking since I left higher education in 2009, and his track record of sensing disruption is impressive.  


Who is responding in ways that make sense?  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:50 AM

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes

Adapting to Change, Leader Lessons From Jeff Weiner, CEO of LinkedIn - Forbes | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

Jeff’s leadership style keeps the company focused on growing at the rate of two new members every second  while reducing the business mantra to just two words: “Next Play.”


Leadership lessons lists abound on-line.  Jeff's list of 10 lessons, however, is tied to a large, successful virtual platform company with real staying power, connected to jobs and career growth - LinkedIn.  


He's obviously trending in the right direction as his inspires his "Next Plays" among his staff.  ~  Deb


Excerpts:


_____________________________

Today, 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

_____________________________


Weiner described how powerful the phrase, "Next Play" has been for the company.


  • On the day LinkedIn became a public company, employees received a black T shirt with the company’s name and stock ticker written across the front and Next Play emblazoned on the back of the shirt. Even today 16 months after the LinkedIn IPO, employees continue to talk about their Next Play and stay focused on delivering results.

1) Define leadership : At LinkedIn, Leadership is the ability to inspire others and achieve shared results. ...to create economic opportunity for the 3.3 billion people in the global workplace by matching skills with job opportunities.

3) Prioritize your business goals: ...if we could only do one thing, what would it be? This is a lesson Weiner learned from Steve Jobs and practices every day. 

6) Customers first: ... anytime the LinkedIn product team considers new enhancements the first question revolves around: Is this putting our members first, or is this putting the company first? “If it benefits members, it will ultimately benefit the company.


7) Remember To laugh: ...Weiner says he values his team members’ sense of humor and sometimes, on a tough day, that can trump their talent and expertise!


Read the full post here.


Read about LinkedIn's new endorsement features here, via Deb's Tech Tuesday blog post:


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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, September 19, 2012 11:42 PM
Thanks Lynn!
Manish Puranik's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:25 AM

Few more lessons on Leadership...!

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Solid Systems: A Michigan Muffin Mix's 21st Century Vision and Values

Solid Systems:  A Michigan Muffin Mix's 21st Century Vision and Values | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

"A rare CEO personal phone call:  After making a customer complaint, I received a phone call from the CEO of Jiffy mix, the top producer of baking mixes in America."


While Jiffy competes by selling quality products at the lowest price (40 to 60 cents for corn muffins, for example), most American companies now try to sell their products by making people feel inadequate. 


Many of our best and brightest minds shuffle paper and money ...to earn big salaries, while the real creators of wealth — bakers, builders, farmers, inventors, teachers, designers, and doctors are loaded down by debt.

Jiffy mix is a welcome trend-breaker.

According to CEO Holmes, "Our staff puts more emphasis on internal and external relationships than we do on completing tasks. This is very different from most companies ... Our dedication to strong family business values, combined with real world professionalism has us uniquely situated for the 21st Century."


Related posts by Deb:


    
    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Michigan based Jiffy Mix will have to fend with GMO issues & carb reduction in the future.  Yet today they know where their core audience is and where they are going.  In the end, business is still all about sustainability, relationships and not just the short term bottom line. ~  Deb

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J.C. Penny update: Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure?

J.C. Penny update:  Too Much Change, Too Fast? Or Customer Connection failure? | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

It is less about how fast CEOs are willing to move than how quickly their most reliable customers are prepared to change.

   

Ron Johnson's bold overhaul of the sagging American retailing icon J.C. Penny went too far too fast.


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Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.


_______________

   

 When "reckless" moves succeed, they're retrospectively rebranded as "bold." When "timidity" triumphs, it's celebrated as "patient" and "safe."

  

Failure simply means leadership went too fast or didn't go fast enough. That's rationalization, not insight.

  

How fast are your customers willing to change?

 

Your own rate of change is determined less by the quality or price/performance of your offerings than the measurable readiness of your customers and clients.

  

_______________

   

Electrolux's  70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.


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Their internal readiness matters more than yours. Their inertia matters more than your momentum.

  

Electrolux, has implemented a new "70% rule" for testing its new product innovations to make sure it's not getting too far ahead or falling too quickly behind either its customers or competitors.

 

Electrolux CEO Keith McLoughlin has declared that new product prototypes have to enjoy at least a 70% customer preference rate in blind competition with best-selling rival products. "

 

Speed to market" isn't what's driving the change.

 

The goal is assuring that the firm's ability to innovate is effectively aligned with the customers' willingness to value them. The 70% rule helps identify and clarify their customers' readiness for change.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's alluring, thinking it is about getting the amount of change just right.  Wrong focus.  It is about where and who the customers area, and how adaptable and ready they are for change.


On the individual level, it's also about preferences for change.  The assessment tool, iWam (the Inventory for Work Attitude and Motivation) has a "clock" feature that shows individual preferences for change.  

As goes the individual, probably so goes the customer culture, witness the articles overview of the tech market and the appliances market.  ~ D

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This Is Generation Flux: Meet The Pioneers Of The New (And Chaotic) Frontier Of Business | Fast Company

This Is Generation Flux: Meet The Pioneers Of The New (And Chaotic) Frontier Of Business | Fast Company | Change Leadership Watch | Scoop.it

That Fast Company identifies GenFlux seems a is a renegade idea way disrupting traditional HR staffing / people concepts for organizations.  Think "churn" as a way of being.


"The future of business is pure chaos. ...So it seems...today.  GenFlux is a mind-set that embraces instability...even enjoys--recalibrating careers, business models, and assumptions."


A variety of careers & ages are profiled in Fast Co's piece.  I remember back when "white water change" and "pinch-points of change," were 90's terms tossed out while working on the latest reorganization, staffing change or technology installation, followed by the brand, is "you" in so many words.  


Excerpts:  


"There's a difference between the broadcast and networked worlds," danah boyd (lower case by intention) and Senior Researcher at Microsoft, says. "Command and control and hierarchical structures are being disintegrated. Big companies are trying to make that slow down. They have massive internal structural issues."


...From classrooms arranged in rows of seats to tenured professors, from the assembly line to the way we promote executives, we have been trained to expect an orderly life.


Thrivers are the members of Generation Flux, who are less a demographic designation than a psychographic one.  


GenFlux is a mind-set that embraces instability, that tolerates--and even enjoys--recalibrating careers, business models, and assumptions.  ...To be successful, businesses and individuals will have to work at it.


This is no simple task. The vast bulk of our institutions--educational, corporate, political--are not built for flux. Few traditional career tactics train us for an era where the most important skill is the ability to acquire new skills.


"I don't have any personal challenges about throwing away the past. If you're not changing, you're giving others a chance to catch up." ~  Pete Cashmore, founder of the widely popular, Mashable, with more than 2 million twitter followers

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