Change & Continuity CCS3.1 Stage 3 (significant events & people)
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Change & Continuity CCS3.1 Stage 3 (significant events & people)
Significance of particular events in the past in developing Australian identities and heritage.
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Picture books

Picture books | Change & Continuity CCS3.1 Stage 3 (significant events & people) | Scoop.it
Azka Afzal's insight:

The Rabbits – by John Marsden & Illustrated by Shaun Tan


This is an excellent resource for exploring the learning outcomes for Stage 3, around the core concept of Colonisation and European settlement from the Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander studies perspective.  The art work is absolutely stunning and evocative.

 

The text is a good introduction into the history of colonisation in Australia.   It is allegorical in nature – depicting the British as the rabbits and the Aboriginals as the possums. There are some deep and disturbing aspects to the seemingly simple narrative – particularly poignant in the dark Illustrations.  The teacher would have to scaffold the learning for students who may not be able to understand or cope with the undertones of the narrative.

 

There is an excellent YouTube video which can sit alongside the classroom learning to further engage students:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kTvXe84UqIQ

 

Assessment tasks could be formulated around:  

 

Role play and simulation: where the students are given an activity to simulate the roles of the settlers and the native inhabitants, whilst exploring the bigger issues of empathy, identity and integration. 

 

The teacher could scaffold the learning of the students by explicitly stating the links between this aspect of colonial history and why its impact is perceived as negative.  This is particularly important in relation to the Zone of assisted performance (from Vygostky’s Zone of Proximal Development (1978), as some students may not be able to connect these historical records.

 

The teacher could also implement a reflection exercise for the students in an enquiry based question-investigation exercise. 

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federation.pdf

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The Australian Identity through understanding the Federation:


This website is a great resource for exploring the learning outcomes for Stage 3, around the concept of sequencing the significant developments in Australian government and the justice system.

 

Although this topic crosses over into CCS3.2, it is still an important aspect of achieving the understanding of core concepts of change in Australian history and identity over time.

 

The one page simple fact sheet could be used as a starting point when exploring the history of the Australian justice system.

 

The learning activities and assessments could be focused around:

 

Unpacking the terminology – by a word-wall activity, to make sure that children grasp the language of federation, territories, parliament, federal, state, elections, commonwealth, prime-minster, state and federal government, democracy, parliament, elections, constitution

 

Map reading – to identify the colonies and territories pre and post federation

 

A linear sequencing of events in the timeline of federation

 

A class excursion could be arrange to Canberra to understand the structure of state and federal government

 

Flow charts to showcase the history pre and post 1901 and significant events

 

An activity of role play and simulation could be conducted, and for Sydney, the children could take an excursion to Centennial Park - to act out the ceremony as conducted on 1 January, 1901

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Who am I?, Anita Heiss - Shop Online for Books in Australia

Who am I?, Anita Heiss - Shop Online for Books in Australia | Change & Continuity CCS3.1 Stage 3 (significant events & people) | Scoop.it
Fishpond Australia, Who am I?: The Diary of Mary Talence, Sydney, 1937 (My story) by Anita Heiss. Buy Books online: Who am I?
Azka Afzal's insight:

Who am I? The diary of Mary Talence Sydney 1937, by Anita Heiss


Written by an acclaimed Indigenous author, belonging to the Wiradjuri nation of Central NSW, this short non-fiction story lends itself to an account of the impact of the stolen generation on all Australians through time. The author is also an Indigenous Literacy Day Ambassador.

 

The appears on the NSW Premiers reading challenge list for secondary years 7-9, but the appropriate age as indicated by the author is between 7 – 11. It is a narrative text, easy to understand, and particularly engaging for the younger audience.  It is told through the eyes of a 10 year old Aboriginal girl, experiencing deep anxiety and issues of identity, whilst residing with a white family in the affluent north shore of Sydney.

 

Classroom learning could be conducted, in the context of exploring identity.

Children could be given an interactive enquiry based task – keeping to the written style of the text, a short term project to denote diary entries for several weeks, which are then shared in short individual presentations to the class.

 

The children could also be asked to produce a linear timeline, the entries of which would be directly reference from the historical notes appended to the back of the book.  For instance, the first & last entries could be as follows:

 

1883 – Aborigines Protection Board set up in NSW

1980 – Link-up NSW Aboriginal Corporation set up to help children and parents finds each other.

 

A higher level thinking exercise could then be conducted in line with the principles of SOLO Taxonomy, by relating the sequence of historical facts in this text, to the fact sheets on the reconciliation website, and to the bigger picture of acceptance, belonging and a shared identity in Australia today (PM Kevin Rudd saying ‘sorry’).

 

http://reconciliaction.org.au/nsw/education-kit/stolen-generations/

 

Formative feedback (Shute, 2008) should be used. 

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Australian identity - australia.gov.au

Australian identity - australia.gov.au | Change & Continuity CCS3.1 Stage 3 (significant events & people) | Scoop.it
Azka Afzal's insight:

The Australian Identity through national achievement (The Australian of the Year awards) with a global perspective: 


This is an excellent resource for stage 3, in achieving the learning outcomes around the concept of significant days to Australian citizenship and examining these from a different perspective.

 

Focusing only on the annual ‘Australian of the Year awards’ – in conjunction with this great website: http://www.australianoftheyear.org.au/the-awards/awards-history/ , the big ideas in this outcome could be related to diversity and globalisation.

 

To test the children’s knowledge and understanding of identity and cultural diversity, a good classroom activity, could be to split the children in pairs and assign one award recipient to each group – for example Shane Phillips, an Indigenous leader, who received the award in 2013.

 

One group could do the research on the history of the awards & present them to the class in a medium of their choice –thereby giving them control of the task.

 

Other groups could do some research on their recipient’s background and culture – and present these findings on a poster, or other mediums which are more meaningful to them, as some children may want to present their findings online.

 

Literacy outcomes could be addressed by designing tasks around core concepts of geography (states and territories) – these could be pinpointed on a map of Australia, in an interactive group activity.

 

A higher level task could involve engaging the children in a reflective exercise of goal setting using an inquiry process of questioning.  Questions could be:

What are goals?

Why is it important to set goals?

How will goal setting help me with achievement? How did goal setting help these great Australian achievers?

 

Once again, the idea is to ensure that the children are active and informed citizens, in keeping with the goals set out in the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (2008).

 

There is a global perspective to this resource – in that the Australian of the Year awards, are recognised globally as a beacon of achievement, with previous winners including Nobel Prize winners.

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Videos : Immigration Nation on SBS

Videos : Immigration Nation on SBS | Change & Continuity CCS3.1 Stage 3 (significant events & people) | Scoop.it
SBS :: Special Broadcasting Service
Azka Afzal's insight:

The interrelated concepts of multiculturalism & diversity – as explored in the SBS documentary ‘immigration Nation’.


This valuable resource in the form of a documentary, is effective in teaching stage 3 outcomes related to the arrival and plight of immigrant groups in Australia, with a focus on the experience of the Chinese immigrants at the turn of the last century.

 

The idea is to ensure that the children are active and informed citizens, in keeping with the goals set out in the Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians (2008)

 

Given the importance of language and its usage in the classroom, a task could be planned to unpack the terminology, in an enquiry based approach.  The focus questions around multiculturalism and diversity could be as follows:  

 

What does the word multiculturalism mean?

 

What does diversity mean? Why is it important?

 

To ascertain where the children are in terms of their knowledge of geography – further questions could be asked:

 

Do you know where China is?

 

Do you have any Chinese friends? What do you know about China?

 

Focus questions around family and belonging; unpack the terminology around ‘families’

 

It is important to design tasks which engage the children –

 

Another activity could be to arrange a school or a class cultural day, where the children are able to dress in their native or traditional clothes, the teachers could invite the parents / community to participate, by bringing in a plate of traditional food.  Stories could be shared through the day – my primary school placed a particular focus on cultural days and it was fantastic!

 

Another effective class exercise could be to work in pairs and learn about your class mate’s culture, background and present it to the class in short 5 minute, informal talk. 

 

The model of formative feedback (Shute, 2008, p153) should be used, in order to improve their learning and behaviours.

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