Change & Continuity
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Change & Continuity

Outcome CCES1: Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others.
Subject Matter: Events and stages in their lifetimes.
Curated by Aidan Cai
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ABC Online Indigenous - TV & Video - All Video

ABC Online Indigenous - TV & Video - All Video | Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Aidan Cai's insight:

The video ‘Tiwi Islanders’ Easter a unique cultural blend’, produced by the ABC, briefly explores the integration of Indigenous Australian culture with Christian Easter celebrations. It has a short duration and frames cultural integration within the familiar significant event of Easter which assists in engaging ES1 students. The relevance of this video to the specified HSIE subject matter is evident through its provision of an Indigenous perspective of the significant event of Easter. Also noteworthy is this resource’s lack of cultural bias which instead, through positively framing cultural integration helps to “promote understanding of people from cultures different to our own” (McIntosh, 1984, p. 3). Regarding use within the HSIE ES1 classroom, some dance and literacy-linked teaching ideas are possible after viewing this resource. However, prior to viewing, students will be asked about Easter customs they are familiar with. After viewing the resource, students will be asked what unfamiliar customs (e.g. lighting a fire) they saw, which will then be explained as the product of mixing cultures. Students will now engage in a dance activity to further explore integration and also highlight personal daily situations. To begin, the class will devise six dance actions inspired by personal daily situations (e.g. brushing teeth). Two dance sequences (three actions each) will then be composed as a class followed by a whole class practice of each sequence. The class will then be halved and each group allocated a sequence. Facing each other, groups will perform their sequence. Following performance, the class will then attempt to integrate the two sequences. Throughout this activity, students participate in creative teacher-guided decision making which Gibson & Ewing (2011) asserts will allow students to “develop ownership of their dance activities” (p. 40). Following this, students will engage in an informal literacy-linked assessment in which each student will verbally explain, provide an opinion of or suggest a new action for their dance. Ultimately, this HSIE-linked resource allows for many teaching ideas, including those related to dance through “DAES1.1- Participates in dance activities and demonstrates an awareness of body parts, control over movement and expressive qualities” (BoS NSW, 2006, p. 27) and English through “Communicates with peers and known adults in informal situations and structured activities dealing briefly with familiar topics” (BoS NSW, 2001, p. 17).

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World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Aidan Cai's insight:

This online resource kit contains five stories of children in developing nations accompanied by images, teacher notes and a worksheet. These stories, detailing the children’s daily activities including attending school and playing sports would engage ES1 learners who will associate with similarities and identify differences. Through this, students can explore personal events for themselves and others, thereby meeting the allocated HSIE subject matter. Concerning this resource’s use in the ES1 HSIE classroom, some visual arts and literacy-linked teaching ideas are possible following an exploration of this resource. For ES1 learners, it would be preferable to better acquaint students with just one story, by reading it to them whilst showing illustrations. Following this, students can be shown the relevant country on a world map and be asked comprehension questions using the included worksheet. Using comprehension questions is advocated by Winch et.al (2010) explaining teachers “must help students draw on and understand information presented in a text” (p. 100). Students will now engage in a visual arts-linked activity which realises the outcome “VAES1.1 – Makes simple pictures and other kinds of artworks about things or experiences” (BoS NSW, 2006, p. 24) and also assists in exploring similarities and differences in their own and the character’s life. The teacher will allocate a shared task (e.g. going to school, playing sport) as well as a perspective (their own or the character’s) to each student who will then paint the scene. This use of visual arts, to deepen student thinking, is recognised by Ewing (2013) stating in creating, students “are able to connect to their own feelings and thoughts and begin to make sense of the world around them” (p. 96). On completion, students will participate in the literacy component in which they write a sentence of phrase describing their painting. Such realises the outcome “WES1.9 – Engages in writing text with the intention of conveying an idea or message” (BoS NSW, 2001, p. 36) while the writing time also allows the teacher to individually talk to students and informally assess understanding. Student artworks will then be displayed, resonating with Ewing’s (2013) assertion “creative efforts need to be acknowledged and respected” (p. 97).

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Victorian Toys and Games

Victorian Toys and Games | Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Aidan Cai's insight:

This website examines Victorian era toys and games, with concise explanations accompanied by visually engaging illustrations, videos and activities. Particularly noteworthy is the activity ‘Victorian children – At work, school and play’ in which the ‘play’ section contains annotated historical images as well as information about various Victorian toys. This resource’s visually engaging nature will undoubtedly engage ES1 learners and enhance HSIE learning and Turner-Bisset (2005) affirms “the computer should be used where it enhances the possibilities for learning” (p. 152). Concerning this resource’s relevance to the specified HSIE subject matter, the exploration of Victorian toys will lead to consideration of students’ own toys and associated personal experiences. When using this resource in the ES1 HSIE classroom, students will have previously been informed to bring in their favourite toy. Firstly, students view the Victorian toy illustrations and verbally differentiate between toys for babies and children their own age. The class will then engage in completing the following cloze passage using toys in the resource: ‘Albert played with __________ when he was little. Now he is older and plays with __________.’. Following this, students will present their toy to the class and then name a toy which they played with as a baby. Using the jointly completed cloze passage as a model, students will now engage in completing a cloze passage about themselves. On completion, students will be photographed with their favourite toy which will later be glued to their cloze-passage worksheets. Finally, worksheets will be stapled together by the teacher to produce a class picture book entitled ‘My Toys’ which can be used in a subsequent reading activity. Regarding assessment, student understanding will be formally ascertained by marking their cloze-passage worksheets. This teaching idea, through the cloze passage exercise, addresses literacy, reflecting the English outcome “WES1.9 – Engages in writing text with the intention of conveying an idea or message” (BoS NSW, 2001, p. 36). Ultimately, this resource, through exploring toys, links not only to HSIE, but effectively engages student prior knowledge which “contributes significantly to the success of subsequent teaching” (Winch et.al, 2010, p. 575).

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Mom, It's My First Day of Kindergarten! By Hyewon Yum

Aidan Cai's insight:

This video, a reading of Hyewon Yum’s picture book ‘Mom, It’s My First Day of Kindergarten’ explores starting kindergarten and associated emotions of excitement, apprehension and relief, with the narration accompanied by engaging music and illustrations. This resource’s relevance to ES1 learners and specifically the allocated HSIE subject matter is evident considering the significance of starting school for ES1 students. Interestingly, Cooper (2002) asserts that exploration of significant past personal events develops historical understanding for children, explaining they “become aware of time through events specific to themselves” (p. 42). Regarding its use within the ES1 HSIE classroom, literacy and drama-linked teaching ideas are possible following viewing this resource. Students will initially engage in the literacy-linked component by verbally recounting memories of starting kindergarten. This will be followed by a joint sentence construction activity on the whiteboard in which a sentence conveying emotion is composed (e.g. I was excited on my first day of kindergarten). Such addresses the English outcome “WES1.9 – Engages in writing text with the intention of conveying an idea or message” (BoS NSW, 2001, p. 36). Following this, students will participate in the drama game ‘role walk’ which further explores emotions associated with starting school. Students will imagine they have just started school and will move around the room feeling like the teacher-allocated adjective (e.g. excited). Students can then introduce themselves to a peer in role when directed. This activity realises the creative arts outcome “DRAES 1.3 – Dramatises personal experiences using movement, space and objects” (BoS NSW, 2006, p. 26). Meanwhile, Turner-Bisset (2005) affirms the use of drama in HSIE, purporting drama acts “as a means for exploring material...through enactive representations of past events, lives and situations” (p. 102). Once both components are complete, students will write their own sentence based on the model in the literacy activity which will formally and summatively assess their writing and drama emotions exploration. Overall, this resource, through exploring an event significant to ES1 students, lends itself not only to HSIE teaching, but also links to literacy and drama.

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Traditions from Around the World. How Birthdays are celebrated?

Traditions from Around the World. How Birthdays are celebrated? | Change & Continuity | Scoop.it
Aidan Cai's insight:

This resource outlines global birthday traditions, with information presented in an easily-navigable list format. However, it lacks visual appeal which may prove unengaging for ES1 learners although it is a useful teacher resource, providing a global perspective on birthday celebrations. Specifically, it would assist in realising the specified HSIE subject matter as birthdays are undoubtedly significant personal events for ES1 learners. Concerning its use in the HSIE ES1 classroom, a teaching idea with links to numeracy is possible following a brief resource-informed teacher explanation of global birthday traditions. The numeracy-linked component will begin with students verbally sharing familiar birthday traditions while a vertical list of ten student contributions is made on the whiteboard. Students will then be informed that a class picture graph will be made showing the number of students who participate in particular birthday activities. Students will raise their hand to indicate participation in a certain activity with each student represented by a stick figure. The teacher will ask some students to assist in counting hands to involve learners in the real data collection process. The use of real data is advocated by Bobis et.al (2009) asserting “using real data helps children to see the relevance of mathematics” (p. 76). On completion of the graph, students will be instructed on how to read and interpret data. Concerning assessment, students will be verbally and informally assessed concerning their understanding of both birthday activities and graphs. Students will be randomly selected to answer questions pertaining to the graph’s purpose as well as participation rates for particular birthday activities. This summative form of assessment is recognised by Winch et.al (2010) stating the assessment process includes “analysing the evidence to arrive at judgements about the achievement of the student in relation to expected outcomes” (p. 132). Overall, this resource inspires not only a HSIE teaching idea, but one that addresses numeracy, specifically “DES1.1 – Represents and interprets data displays made from objects and pictures” (BoS NSW, 2006, p. 21).

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