Change and Continuity - Stage 2 HSIE
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Change and Continuity - Stage 2 HSIE
Resources to encourage discussion about the contribution of people and groups from other countries to Australian heritage. CCS2.1 and CCS2.2
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ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map

ABC Online Indigenous - Interactive Map | Change and Continuity - Stage 2 HSIE | Scoop.it
David Cox's insight:

This site contains an interactive Indigenous language map of Australia. It allows you to hover over the map with your cursor and it will zoom in on highlighted areas.

Using this resource in the classroom students could compare the language map with a current map of Australia.  After making observations, the students could then evaluate the effect that state and city borders had on language clans around Australia.

Another activity that could arise from analysis of the resource involves students identifying which language group their local area falls into. The interactive nature of the resource means the teacher or students may more thoroughly explore specific areas. For example, students could zoom in on their local language area. If students in the class have moved from other areas in Australia they might like to find their original local language group.

Students could then discuss the expansion of English, a language introduced by British settlers, and the effect this had on the traditional Aboriginal languages. Questions such as, “How many Indigenous languages survive today?” could be researched as a class or individually.

As well as addressing outcome CCS2.2, this resource can be used to explore outcomes in ENS2.5 related to using geographical terminology and locating students’ local areas on a map.

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Documenting Democracy

David Cox's insight:

The website provides a description of the document, a brief history surrounding the document and a link to a PDF transcript of the document. The document itself shows the order given to Captain Arthur Phillip by the British government with instructions on how to proceed when establishing a settlement in New South Wales.

This resource allows students to explore an important figure in the British settlement of Australia. In reference to CCS2.2, students can explore the changes to the local area that occurred under the guidance of Governor Arthur Phillip and the effect that had on where we live today. Students should also have the opportunity to develop an understanding of what impact those decisions had on the lives of the local Indigenous population.

As part of the analysis of this resource, students should be able to examine the contribution of the British settlers to the Australian national heritage. It should be used as a part of a greater unit of work focusing on the British settlement of Australia.

A possible assessment task related to this resource could be the completion of a case study of Captain/Governor Arthur Phillip. Students could present an oral report combined with a poster or slide show presentation as aligned to the English syllabus TS2.2 and the HSIE syllabus CCS2.2.

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Family - Australian Museum

Family - Australian Museum | Change and Continuity - Stage 2 HSIE | Scoop.it
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a complex system of family relations, where each person knows their kin and their land.
David Cox's insight:

This resource allows student to begin to explore the family structure of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. There is an outline of the various roles played by each member of the community. The site also gives an overview of how children in the community were educated through observation and storytelling.

This resource could be used to start a class discussion on family structures and how they have changed over time, addressing CCS2.2 of the HSIE syllabus. The teacher can make reference here to British settlers and the family structures that they brought with them.

A class activity could start with a catalogue of the different family structures in the class; this activity relates to stage 2 outcomes in the Mathematics syllabus DS2.1. After analysis of the class family structures, students can discuss the differences with the family structure represented in the resource and their own family structure. Students could formulate opinions of the advantages and disadvantages of different family structures and discuss these with the class. This also addresses outcomes in the stage 2 English syllabus TS2.1.

A proposed assessment is to set students the task of interviewing an older relative, whether it be a grandparent, uncle, aunt, or parent, etc. The students would ask questions about the relative’s experiences as a child and compare them to their own experiences. Questions may be formulated by the class, first in small groups, and then as an entire class. Opportunity should also be given for students to ask ‘own choice’ questions that are independently devised. Students would then be required to report their findings to the class. Teachers can give students options as to how they would present their findings to the class. As part of this assessment, teachers should be aware of any potential sensitive family situations in the class and assess whether it is appropriate to use the activity if there is such a situation. The student centred approach in this assessment is designed to give students a sense of ownership over their assessment. Stefanou, Perencevich, DiCintio, and Turner (2004) described three supporting factors to student autonomy that when combined, enhance student engagement in classroom activities and assessment. These include: a) organisational autonomy support, b) procedural autonomy support and c) cognitive autonomy support. Addressing these supporting factors enhances students’ ownership over the structure of the interview and presentation of findings. Further, the research indicates that encouraging ‘own choice’ questions provides a more engaging experience for students.

Reference
Stefanou, C. R., Perencevich, K. C., DiCintio, M., & Turner, J. C. (2004). Supporting autonomy in the classroom: Ways teachers encourage student decision making and ownership, Educational Psychologist, 39(2), 97-110. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/hedp20

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Early Vocabularies | State Library of New South Wales

Early Vocabularies | State Library of New South Wales | Change and Continuity - Stage 2 HSIE | Scoop.it
Indigenous Australians indigenous languages and english translations
David Cox's insight:

This resource links directly with the interactive map that is also scooped on this site. It provides examples of recordings made by early settlers of the native language, including the language of the Eora. Students can explore digital copies of original records of native language in and around the Sydney area.

After exploration of the examples, teachers could provide students with an image, the English word for the image and the word in the native language for the image, with words from the online examples. Teachers could then have students match all three elements on a worksheet. This could also be done with A4 sheets of paper, approached as a whole class activity and the results could be displayed on a wall in the classroom.

 Another way to engage with the local language group would be to have an Indigenous community leader from the area visit the class. The community leader could possibly teach the class a traditional song, sung in their native language. After learning the traditional song, students could then perform the song at a school assembly or for another class. This activity would address outcomes in the creative arts syllabus under MUS2.1. Students could then hold an interview with the community leader, asking questions they have about Indigenous culture. This activity would address outcomes under TS2.1 in the English syllabus for stage 2.

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Bush foods of NSW - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia

Bush foods of NSW - Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust - Sydney, Australia | Change and Continuity - Stage 2 HSIE | Scoop.it
David Cox's insight:

This website provides a gateway to a publication titled 'Bush foods of New South Wales' (Stewart & Percival, 1997).This text provides detailed information on a large range of bush foods commonly found in NSW. The website features links to each plant studied in the text, which can be used to explore each plant in detail.

An in-class activity could involve showing students images of different bush foods represented in the text and finding out if students can identify the different plants. Following this, discussion would take place around how those plants were used in traditional Indigenous cooking. Students could then compare these traditional ingredients with ingredients commonly found at home and identify where substitutions could be made.

A second activity could be the exploration of a traditional diet in the local area before British settlers arrived. This would be followed by analysis of a diet typical for a settler coming to Australia on the First Fleet. Discussion would involve analysis of how the two cultural groups shared resources and what affect that had on each group. Students would look at the positive and negative effects that arose from sharing food knowledge. This could be followed by a comparison to our modern diet. The question “How has the diet of someone living in the Sydney area changed over time?” or “How did British settlement change the diet of people in the Sydney area?” could be explored by students as this addresses CCS2.2 in the HSIE syllabus.

A possible assessment to follow these activities could be to have students create a dinner menu using traditional Indigenous ingredients from the local area.

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