Stage 1 - Change and continuity (CCS1.1) - Original stories of other students, their families, their community and other communities. How can we find out more about the people and communities around us? What makes us similar? What makes us different?
34 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Emily Zuccali
Scoop.it!

Teacher Resource: Working with Aboriginal communities

"Many teachers have expressed a need for some clear guidelines to begin the process of consulting with local Aboriginal communities to allow them to include Aboriginal people in their teaching.

 

'Working with Aboriginal Communities' provides advice on how to start this process and encourage a relationship with the local Aboriginal community.

 

Observing appropriate protocols when working with Aboriginal
people and their communities is critical to establishing
positive and respectful relationships...Providing Aboriginal people with the opportunity to become involved in school programs gives authenticity to local Aboriginal perspectives. Students, schools and communities all benefit from encouraging Aboriginal people to share their  knowledge and life stories."

Emily Zuccali's insight:

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective teacher resource:

 

As Harrison (2013) suggests "A key point about including Aboriginal perspectives in your classroom is to make Aboriginal Australia an ongoing 'reference point' for students" (p. 178)

 

Teachers are encouraged to collaborate with the local Indigenous community to provide an authentic Aboriginal perspective within the classroom environment. One way teachers could meet the above outcome, is through inviting an Indigenous member from the local community into the classroom. This provides the students with the opportunity to hear not only the Indigenous person's own personal stories, but also the stories of their community. In doing so, students are be exposed to the many aspects of  authentic Indigenous culture, both directly and indirectly.

 

The 'Working with Aboriginal Communities' pdf is a valuable resource for all teachers. It is a tool which can assist them in the process of collaborating with the Indigenous community in a positive and respectful manner. The pdf provides teachers with the knowledge and tools of how to properly and respectfully "establish learning partnerships with Aboriginal communites" (Board of Studies, 2008, p.9) and outlines the protocols that teachers should follow to seek consultation from Indigenous community.

 

It is encouraged that teachers become well acquainted with this important document. It should be read and followed carefully. It's relevance  is further heightened, due to the requirements placed on all teachers to embed Aboriginal perspectives into their lessons. This is irrespective of the presence or absence of Indigenous and Torres Strait Islanders students in their class (Harrison, 2013).

 

Another avenue for consultation with the Indigenous community that teachers could pursue, is to contact their local AECG to provide assistance and advice. The NSW AECG is "a non for profit Aboriginal organisation that provides advice on all matters relevant to education and training with the mandate that this advice represents the Aboriginal community viewpoint" (AECG, 2014). Teachers should investigate what region their school community belongs to and then contact their appropriate regional or local committee members.

 

Embedded is a link to the AECG website which can be used for more information and details about regions and appropriate contacts: http://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/

 

 

References:

 

Board of Studies NSW (2008). Working with Aboriginal Communities: 

A Guide to Community Consultation and Protocols. NSW: Board of Studies.

 

Harrison, N. (2013). Teaching and Learning in Aboriginal Education. 2nd Edition. Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

 

NSW AECG (2014). About NSW AECG. Retrieved April 1, 2014 from NSW AECG website: http://www.aecg.nsw.edu.au/about/

 

 

 

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Zuccali
Scoop.it!

Global perspective student resource: Where Children Sleep

Global perspective student resource: Where Children Sleep | Stage 1 - Change and continuity (CCS1.1) - Original stories of other students, their families, their community and other communities.  How can we find out more about the people and communities around us? What makes us similar? What makes us different? | Scoop.it
Emily Zuccali's insight:

Global perspective student resource:

 

As the old adage does say "A picture is worth a thousand words" and this holds true with this resource. The book complied by James Mollison portrays images of children around the world and their bedrooms.

 

Teachers could use this resource by  carefully selecting a handful of the images to analyse as a class. Students would be encouraged to be 'detectives' and through carefully looking at the images, describe what they can tell about these individuals: how they live ? and What might we know about them?

 

Such an activity builds the literacy skills of students in the areas of visual literacy and prediction.

 

In regards to this resource, it is imperative to note that the teacher must carefully preview the resource and use their knowledge of the class and the students when selecting the images they wish to use as a stimulus. Some of the images may be confronting for the students or even culturally insensitive. But carefully selecting, the teacher can overcome this obstacle. 

 

To further extend the task, teachers can ask students to bring in a photo of their own bedroom and have them make a short presentation to the class. In the presentation students would be encouraged discuss:

- where they live?

-  what kind of home do they live in? (apartment, house, town house ect).

- provide a description of their room

- what's could be found in their room (Eg.  trophies from the sport they participate in, a stuffed toys given to them from their grandparents ect)

- Selecting 5 of their most important items found in their bedroom and  explaining why they are of importance.

 

I believe it to be a useful task as it not only develops the students' cultural understanding, but is also linked to their own lives.  In this way, students are able to share their own stories and this makes it relevant to their own world. Such meaningfulness, creates an environment in which students are more likely to engage with the task (Dufficy, 2013; Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011; Marsh, 2010).

 

References:

 

Dufficy, P. (2013). Designing learning for diverse classrooms. Newtown, NSW: Primary English Teaching Association Australia.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. 5th Edition. NSW: Pearson Australia.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Zuccali
Scoop.it!

Student resource: Cherbourg children's picture diaries virtual book

Student resource: Cherbourg children's picture diaries virtual book | Stage 1 - Change and continuity (CCS1.1) - Original stories of other students, their families, their community and other communities.  How can we find out more about the people and communities around us? What makes us similar? What makes us different? | Scoop.it
Emily Zuccali's insight:

Student resource:

 

This virtual book is a compilation of self-portraits and profiles of students who live in the Cherbourg community in Queensland.

 

This virtual book can be read together as a class and  used as a stimulus for the class to find out about the stories of other students of a similar age group. 

 

This activity can then be extended by having a class discussion about how the students the in the class are similar or different to the students from Cherbourg.

 

The teacher may wish to extend the learning experience by then asking  students  to compile their own profiles about themselves. Students would produce self portraits and  other artworks of significant places, people or things in their lives to be included.

 

This task would help students to develop their literacy skills in writing.Teacher scaffolding is required to support the learning and make the activity age appropriate. This ensures that the teacher undertakes their responsibility to create an environment in which " children will want to write and can write" (Winch et al., 2011, p. 430).

 

The teacher could do some shared writing as class to provide examples,  ensure students have to key words through word banks/sight words and provide a list of starter sentences.

 

Examples of sentence starters include:

 - My name is....

- I am ..... years old

- In my family there is...

- I go to school at...

- I have a pet called... it's a.....

 

Such prompts and assist students thinking and in turn writing.

 

Both activities link to the students own personal context and therefore help students to form "a real connection to what is placed before them" (Dufficy, 2013, p. 27). This increases the likihood of students engaging with the task. 

 

The teacher may also wish to compile the students profiles into a class book, which then could be distributed to parents or even showcased in the school library.

 

This activity can link with the stapeless storybook resource (link provided bellow) as a means for the class 'published' their book.

http://www.readwritethink.org/files/resources/interactives/stapleless/

 

This activity links well with other KLAs of English, Creative arts and PDHPE.

 

References:

 

Dufficy, P. (2013). Designing learning for diverse classrooms. Newtown, NSW: Primary English Teaching Association Australia.

 

Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P., Ljungdahl, L. & Holliday, M. (2011). Literacy: Reading, writing & children's literature. South Melbourne: Oxford University Press.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Zuccali
Scoop.it!

Student resource: Grandparents Song.

Emily Zuccali's insight:

Student resource:

 

This song provides a perspective of how grandparents lived when they were young. It provides an engaging and fun medium, through which students can start to consider and explore the stories of older generations. Students are encourage to consider how they would lived when their grandparents were their age.

 

The teacher could begin a lesson by giving the class a chance to listen to the song a couple of times and  then even potentially sing along. After this introduction,  the teacher should encourage the students to form pairs and discuss: What they found interesting about the song,. Was there anything they learnt from it?, What  do they think the song is saying? According to the song, how was life for grandpas' and grandmas? What did they do? Is that different to how they (the students) live now? These pair discussions should be shared with the class. Such an activity allows for the students to reflect on their current knowledge and experiences and link it to their learning, which Hoeper & Gilber (2011) consider to be a Key principle in providing worthwhile learning in the SOSE environment.

 

This could then lead on to the teacher assigning the class a homework project to interview their grandparents on how life was like for them growing up. This could be used then as a form of assessment. The investigation would focus on aspects such as:  

-  What school was like?

- What kind of interests did they have?

- What were some of their hobbies?

- What kind of games did they play?

- What kind of toys did they have?

- How did they spend their weekends?

- What their house was like?

 

.A proforma sheet with such starting questions may be useful to assist students to conduct their interviews. However, teachers should encourage students to create their own questions to gain unique responses. Students could then  fill in a basic Venn diagram of the similarities and differences between they way their grandparents lived and how they live today. 

 

The teacher may then wish to have students to present  their findings to the class  in the format of a short presentation. This allows students to demonstrate and celebrate their learning that they have achieved through the investigation process. Hoepper & Gilbert (2011) state identify this opportunity to be the 3rd stage of the investigation process.

 

The above activities have been designed to encourage engagement with the task as they are relevant and of value to the student (Gilbert & Hooper, 2011; Marsh, 2010). The open ended nature of the task, having no right or wrong answers, also increases the likelihood of engagement, as students loose the fear of failure associated with tasks that limit answers to right or wrong. (Marsh, 2010). 

 

These activities would link well with the English KLA, especially in regards to the literacy. This task allows for students to develop their skills in using speech to inform others.

 

Something that the teacher must be mindful and sensitive about when using this resources and implementing such an activity is that some students may not have access to their grandparents. The teacher must know their students well, and if such a situation arises the student could be encouraged to find another older family member or family friend to interview. Otherwise the teacher may organise someone the student could interview.

 

References:

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment. 4th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. 5th Edition. NSW: Pearson Australia.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Emily Zuccali
Scoop.it!

Global Perspectives student resource: Skype in the classroom

Global Perspectives student resource: Skype in the classroom | Stage 1 - Change and continuity (CCS1.1) - Original stories of other students, their families, their community and other communities.  How can we find out more about the people and communities around us? What makes us similar? What makes us different? | Scoop.it
Skype in the classroom is a free and easy way for teachers to open up their classroom. Meet new people, talk to experts, share ideas and create amazing learning experiences with teachers from aroun...
Emily Zuccali's insight:

Global Perspectives student resource:

 

The use of Skype in the classroom environment can open up your classroom to a world of possibilities (literally). Teachers can use this medium to connect with another classroom around the world. Through appropriate scaffolding, students can begin to uncover the original stories of other students around the world and the communities that they live in. Teachers are encouraged to find another classroom of approximately the same age group. 

 

Students can use appropriate questioning to learn more about the other students in their class and their community. A game such as 20 questions could be adapted, to help students be selective with the questions they ask. This therefore links with their literacy development of questioning skills. Such a limit on questions that can be asked also keeps in mind the time that can be afforded for this task in the busy classroom environment. It wouldn't be surprising if students get carried away and want to spend more time than is available on this task.  However, teachers can schedule multiple Skype conferences throughout the year to form relationships with other classes around the world.

 

These links formed can also be embedded into other lessons across the KLAs to further deepen students global perspectives, as well as maintain engagement.

 

Such a learning experience, also encourages collaborative learning. This collaborative learning extends beyond the students within the class to peers around the world. As Petty's (2009) research suggests, cooperative learning strategies when "well used...can improve students' achievement by at least a grade, but even if there was no improvement in achievement we should still use them because they improve students' behaviour, self-esteem, and more crucial still, their attitudes to each other" (p. 143).

 

If you feel as though technology isn't your strong suit or your not sure how to approach the whole thing, embedded is a link to a website which not only outlines the benefits of using skype in the classroom environment, but also provides a step-by-step guide on to how to use this tool for educational purposes http://edtechreview.in/trends-insights/insights/699-teachers-guide-classroom-to-classroom-interaction-using-skype-and-epals

 

Using Skype does however require a lot of administration prior to the lesson to ensure its success. To assist in finding teachers willing to connect with skype, embedded is  link which connects you to a list of teachers who are willing to Skype. Information included on this page includes the teacher's name, their skype address, the class they're teaching and what they're willing to discuss. To find the most recent entries click onto  http://www.skypeforeducators.com/educators.htm and scroll down to the bottom of the sheet.

 

 References:

 

Petty, G. (2009). Evidence-Based Teaching: A Practical Approach. 2nd Edition. Cheltenham, United Kingdom: Nelson Thornes.

more...
No comment yet.