Change and Continuity - Family, School, Local, National and Global Events
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Indij Readers

Indij Readers | Change and Continuity - Family, School, Local, National and Global Events | Scoop.it
Monika J's insight:

Indij readers is a fantastic website for teachers to find books that come from an Aboriginal perspective. There are a wide range of books from three different series which are then split into two categories 'big fellas' and 'little fellas', aimed at older students and primary students, respectively. The site works with Aboriginal communities, government and non-government organisations and education and learning institutions, which makes it a great source for finding resources from a range of views. Many of the books make a good link to the syllabus, where students can gain an understanding of events from an Indigenous perspective, including 'Having fun at school' by Taminya Fisher, Thuy Le, Meiko Bell, Ernie Blackmore. From this book, students can look at the similarities in their schooling, and write about an activity which is similar to their schooling. This can also become an assessment task. However if the class is still expanding their reading and writing skills the teacher and the class can work together to complete the task. Winch, et al (2010) suggests that reading and writing go together as it helps to 'expand their knowledge' (p. 435). By reading and writing together students begin to build on their literacy skills while also gaining a greater understanding.

 

Reference:

Winch, G., et al, (2010), Literacy, Oxford university press, Melbourne.

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The Classroom Bookshelf: Mirror

The Classroom Bookshelf: Mirror | Change and Continuity - Family, School, Local, National and Global Events | Scoop.it
Monika J's insight:

Jeanie Baker's "Mirror" is an excellent resource for teachers to use in the classroom and this website is one of many that provides teachers with lesson activities that relate to the book to use in the classroom. The book looks into the lives of two boys, one from Sydney Australia and one from Morocco. This is an ideal resource as many students can relate to the Sydney boy, however some may also relate to the boy from Morocco as they may come from other countries, in this way, students can makes to links to their own heritage and others.

 

The website provides teachers with activities relating to specific stages, as well as combining literacy activities, and visual literacy. Winch et al (2010) argues that studying picture books allows students to create new meanings, therefore reading a picture book helps students in improve their visual literacy which becomes an important factor in this current lifestyle. However, other activities can be made from this text, teachers can invite students to make a storyboard of their own lives and then compare it with other students in the classroom. In this way student gain a better understanding that many students are different but may share many of the same customs or values. Teachers may use this work as an assessment task to see how students interact and understand their own heritage as well as that of other students.

 

Reference:

Winch, G., et al, (2010), Literacy, Oxford university press, Melbourne.

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Lesson Plan Ideas

Monika J's insight:

This website by the NSW education and training links directly to the syllabus dot point, Change and Continuity: Significant Events and People, CCES1 Describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others. The webpage is a great resource for teachers as it provides a number of activities that are linked to the syllabus dot point. The page is also broken up into further categories related to the subject, Aboriginal dreaming, people in our lives, relationships, family heritage, changes to places we know, and me and my family. This is particularly helpful for teachers as, if they are wishing to teach a certain aspect from the syllabus in regards to a certain category, teachers can use this as a source for students work. The activities include many literacy links to both reading and writing. Many of the activities can be made into assessment tasks for the teacher to use, as they are simple skills that the teacher can observe.

 

Teacher must be aware that some activities may be harder for some students and should only be used when the teacher is confident that the students are capable to do so. However it should also challenge the students slightly so that they are learning. It is also helpful as many of the tasks can be adapted to suit each class. The teacher must be aware of their student capabilities.

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Archaeology excursion - learning about the past

Monika J's insight:

There are a number of ways that teachers can educate students on past events and compare them to the present however many students learn from visual and hands on activities, therefore going on an excursion would help students to gain an understanding of the subject matter. On this excursion, students take part in an archaeological dig and find what is was once like to live in Port Philip. This is would be a good way to introduce students to the idea that everything we have was not always here. The excursion looks into the heritage of the local land and how it has changed. Dr. Michael Laitman and Dr. Anatoly Ulianov (2011), argue that excursions facilitate a multifaceted perception of the world. So by going and experiencing, students can gain a better understanding of the subject.

 

The excursion is run by the Sydney Observatory, and has a stage specific activity for each year group, making it a great resource for students learning.

 

Following the excursion, as an assessment students can write a small recount on the excursion, provided they have acquired the skills in writing recounts. If not, students can create two drawings, one that shows what students saw from the excursion and one that shows a similar scene to the present day.

 

Reference:

Laitman, M., & Uilanov, A., (2011), Chapter 6: A Multifaceted Perception Of The World. The Psychology of the Integral Society Lanham: Bnei Baruch/Laitman Kabbalah

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Who are the families of the world | Global Education

Who are the families of the world | Global Education | Change and Continuity - Family, School, Local, National and Global Events | Scoop.it
Monika J's insight:

This webpage would be one of the most useful to teachers as it provides teachers with a number of activities to give to students in relation to the syllabus, describes events or retells stories that demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others, especially in relation to family, however it also gives a global perspective. The website includes a wide range of different activities that includes the use of classroom resources and digital resources. Cennamo's, et al (2010) book 'technology integration for meaningful classroom use' argues that the use of technology can help foster students understanding during learning. As well as ICT skills students can develop their literacy skills from the activities. Many of the activities found on the page can also be changed into an assessment for the teacher to use. Teachers can also change some of the activities to make sure students are capable of completing. For instance teachers can take the first activity and change it to include a verbal discussion or they can take the images and as a class place them on a map to make a link to where they're from. Each activity found on the page makes a link to different aspects of family life, family, people in the family, families that work together, celebrations by different families, and how children have different dreams about their future when they grow up.

 

The many activities asks students to think of their own family heritage and then compare them to those of families around the world. Many of the activities look into the lives of families living in poverty. Not only does this introduce different cultures but it also introduces students to the idea that some people and places around the world are not a lucky as the students.

 

Reference:

Cennamo, K., et al (2010), technology integration for meaningful classroom use, Wadsworth, Belmont.

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