Change and Continuity - CCES1
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Primary Australian History Activity Book

Primary Australian History Activity Book | Change and Continuity - CCES1 | Scoop.it
Kate Murray's insight:

CCES1 requires students to demonstrate knowledge of their own heritage and the heritage of others – a shared history, a series of events and stages that have lead to the Australia we now live in. As such, the linked resource is an e-book designed to provide students with an awareness of major events in the history of Australia and the implications of these events in modeling our nation. This book is a particularly helpful resource for teachers as it provides a page of teacher notes before continuing with 3 pages for students. The teacher’s notes include suggestions for further exploration activities that allow for widening the scope of knowledge by investigating similar people or events. Furthermore, this resource provides assessment ideas for the teacher as it has a series of multiple-choice quizzes for each topic (pp. 98-109), which allows the teacher to gage if the students have understood foundational concepts before moving on.

 

Another helpful tool in this resource is a timeline of major Australian and world events from 1788 to the present, which could be displayed in the classroom to remind students of their learning and create a literacy-rich classroom. Tyson (KimberlyTyson, 2013) suggests that a literacy-rich environment is particularly important for Early Stage 1 learners as it “provides a setting that encourages and supports speaking, listening, reading, and writing in a variety of authentic ways – through print & digital media” (para. 2).

 

Moreover, this resource could be adapted for a series of IWB lessons in which children are called to become active participants in the classroom. For example, the activity sheet on page 4 requires students to circle traditional Aboriginal foods – an activity that could be completed through class collaboration and the use of the IWB markers. Alternatively, a drag-and-drop activity could be undertaken with the work on page 7 that requires students to match sentences to the correct weapon or tool. These are just a few ideas from the many interactive educational opportunities this resource provides!

 

KimberlyTyson. (2013). A Literacy-rich classroom supports the common core. Retrieved March 30, 2014 from http://www.learningunlimitedllc.com/2013/01/literacy-rich-environments-support-the-common-core-infographic/

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World Vision Australia | Global Education

World Vision Australia | Global Education | Change and Continuity - CCES1 | Scoop.it
Kate Murray's insight:

“A Day in the Life of Lucy” is a global education resource provided by World Vision. It seeks to encourage Early Stage 1 students to become global citizens, developing awareness of the lives of other children around the world. This resource also encourages the notion of ‘sharing’, an important moral for students to learn as they enter Primary School. The 4-minute video acts as the catalyst for all of the other activities, however, it is important to consider your learners when using this resource as it may need to be shortened for an Early Stage 1 class, broken up in to segments for a series of 6-8 lessons. Early Stage 1 educators should refer to the activities that are aimed at “lower years” (‘Where is Uganda?’, ‘Lucy’s Story’, ‘Make a toy’, ‘Play a game’ & ‘What does it mean to share?’).

 

Many of these activities will appeal to the kinesthetic/tactile learners in a classroom. “Make a toy,” allows students to learn through touch and the manipulation of objects. The International Learning Styles of Australasia (ILSA) noted in its research that “most young [Early Stage 1 students] enjoy and benefit from tactile approaches to teaching and learning” (2010, para. 2). Furthermore, “Play a game” (another hands-on-activity) provides a cross-curriculum learning experience as students recognise that many familiar sports (PDHPE) are played around the world, but that they can be limited by the equipment available.  

 

This series of activities could underpin a unit of work in which students gain an understanding of the heritage of other children, gaining an appreciation of their life, whilst having fun with a series of engaging multi-media, arts & craft and PDHPE activities.

 

ILSA. (2010). Tactile Learning Strategies for Learners Who Prefer to Begin by Making or Handling Materials. Retrieved March 31, 2014 from http://www.ilsa-learning-styles.com/Learning+Styles/Tactile+Learning+Strategies.html

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Dust Echoes | Indigenous Education

Dust Echoes | Indigenous Education | Change and Continuity - CCES1 | Scoop.it
Kate Murray's insight:

This resource can be used in an Early Stage 1 class to explore ‘The Dreaming’ – an integral part of Indigenous culture and heritage. “Dust Echoes” is a series of animated dreamtime stories that explain Indigenous concepts of love, duty to country, loyalty and Aboriginal custom and law.

 

CCES1 requires that students learn about events and stages in THEIR lifetimes that “demonstrate their own heritage and the heritage of others” (Board of Studies, 2006, p. 42). ‘The Dreaming’ is an integral part of our Australian heritage and is still the medium through which Indigenous people understand their law. The Indigenous people believe ‘The Dreaming’ explains how their Ancestral Beings moved across the land and created life and significant geographical features.

 

A possible teaching idea for an Early Stage 1 class could be to explore the way in which we learn about our heritage and how we remember events in our lifetimes. This lesson would take place after a series of introductory lessons, in which the students would have become familiarized with Indigenous Culture. Students could listen to a chosen Dreaming story from the “Dust Echoes” website (e.g. “Whirlpool”). The teacher could then use this as a platform to generate discussion about 1) what they understood from the story 2) did they enjoy listening to the story 3) who's heritage is being spoken about in the story 4) how do they hear about their past 5) who tells them stories 6) what have they learnt about their culture through stories etc. This informal discussion or “exploratory talk” (Winch, 2010, p. 58) appeals in particular to “text-participant learners” (p. 155), as active participation allows them to gain meaning from the stimulus. Furthermore, class discussion develops students spoken-like language, whilst creating a non-threatening environment in which students feel they can become active participants, contributing their thoughts without ‘getting it wrong’; as all suggestions are correct, each person just has a different story to tell! 

 

Winch, G. (2010). Literacy: Reading, Writing & Children’s Literature. Melbourne: Oxford University Press. 

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Human Society and It's Environment EBook

Human Society and It's Environment EBook | Change and Continuity - CCES1 | Scoop.it
Kate Murray's insight:

This set of photocopiable activities provides 16 activity sheets for students exploring CCES1. This resource assists the teacher in the execution of an organised and progressive outcomes based approach to teaching HSIE. These simple activity sheets are ideal for an Early Stage 1 class as they are clearly laid out, use simple language and involve a variety of learning modes – writing, drawing & talking to others. Furthermore, these activities are inclusive of all students as there are various activities, events and stages of their life explored. Each student should feel they can relate to an activity e.g. bedtime or birthdays.

 

Additionally, many of the activity sheets create an opportunity for cross-curriculum learning. For example, students are required to count the number of teeth in their mouth (p. 28 of the resource), or identify the month in which they were born (p. 23 of the resource). In Early Stage 1 Math, students begin to understand the concept of time (MES1.5), as they are encouraged to “relate an event to a particular day” (Board of Studies, 2002, p. 180). Thus, the activity sheet on p. 23 will allow students to recognise the date and month of their birthday, compare their answers to others and use mathematically appropriate terms in their interactions. This cross-curriculum learning experience in which knowledge is taught in the context of other knowledge is being strongly advocated in current research. The ACARA acknowledges the importance of interwoven learning as it offers “opportunities to add depth and richness to student learning” (ACARA, 2013, para. 2) and prevents the “problem of fragmentation and isolated skill instruction” (Houghton Mifflin, 1997, para. 3).

 

ACARA. (2013). Cross-curriculum priorities. Retrieved April 1, 2014 from http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/cross_curriculum_priorities.html

Board of Studies. (2002). Mathematics K-6 Syllabus. Sydney: Board of Studies

Houghton Mifflin. (1997). What is Interdiscuplinary/Cross-Curricular Teaching?. Retrieved April 1, 2014 from www.eduplace.com/rdg/res/literacy/interd0.html

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Our Many Identities | Global Education

Our Many Identities | Global Education | Change and Continuity - CCES1 | Scoop.it
Kate Murray's insight:

Australia is a multicultural nation, one in which all peoples heritage and cultural identity should be celebrated. As such, we should be teaching our students from Early Stage 1 onwards, that our differences are to be embraced and that each student will come to school with a unique story.

 

The resource linked above provides teachers with a number of activities that could form the basis for a Unit of Work, exploring the background of students, their journey to Australia or their rich Australian generational heritage. In particular, Activity 1 ‘Celebrating arriving in my family’, allows students to share a piece of show-and-tell (a baby image), building their confidence to talk in front of the class and present a unique story. This provides a cross-curriculum learning experience, as students are required in English (TES1.2) to make brief oral presentations and listen to others with attentiveness.

A consideration for the teacher in planning this lesson would be “how would you make sure all students feel they are celebrated?” (Is there a certain number of times you clap after each student talks? Do you require students to get up that are very nervous? What about those students who are adopted and don’t have a baby photo?). These questions are all part of the ‘planning’ stage in which the teacher should seek to make the “lesson meaningful and appropriate” (Marsh, 2010, p. 101) for an Early Stage 1 class.

 

Whilst this method of teaching, requiring students to speak individually, could be seen as intimidating for many students, Vygostky’s Zone of Proximal Development Theory suggests that it is in these moments - when students are presented with challenging tasks - that cognitive development takes place (Marsh, 2010, p. 45). Thus, with a supportive classroom environment, this task will not only develop students understanding of their heritage and the heritage of others (CCES1), but it will also develop their social interaction and organizational language skills (Marsh, 2010, p. 47).  

 

Marsh, C. (2010). Becoming a Teacher: Knowledge, Skills and Issues. Sydney: Pearson

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