Chinese Esoteric Traditions
2.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Chinese Esoteric Traditions
If you do not employ the method of Sudden Illumination, you will be like a jackal following and imitating a lion but unable to become a lion even after hundreds and thousands of aeons.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Zen Quotes - Quotes of Inspiration, Wisdom, Authenticity & Humour

Zen Quotes - Quotes of Inspiration, Wisdom, Authenticity & Humour | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
A collection of Inspiring Quotes by Zen Masters, artists, writers, humorists, celebrities, activists and others - as tweeted by @Zen_Moments
A Rosemont Journey's insight:

Zen Buddhism was transmitted from China to Japan in the twelfth century, and is distinguished by the direct transmission of profound insight into the nature of Reality, from master to disciple, rather than through reliance on words and scriptures.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

The Great Bell Chant (The End Of Suffering)

A dear friend introduced me to this video..I was transported to a place of serenity and hope. I hope you feel the same. The change we wish to see in the worl...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

I Ching: Living Change

I Ching: Living Change | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
the transformative work of Stephen Karcher...Change is a living stream of images or symbols that unfold the Way or Dao. At a critical point in the historical evolution of this great tradition, during the early Han Dynasty (c.200 bce-200 ce), a series of Confucian scholar-bureaucrats codified and organized the symbols of Change. They turned the tradition into moral and social philosophy
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

The illusion of the Ego - ALAN WATTS

"We must abandon completely the notion of blaming the past for any kind of situation we're in and reverse our thinking and see that the past always flows bac...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Ch'an Masters: Hui-neng

Ch'an Masters: Hui-neng | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
The term sutra is reserved for a sermon of Gautama Buddha or one of the great Bodhisattvas, and the canon of the Ch'an school, the Tripitaka, contains only one Chinese work bearing that title: The Sutra Spoken by the Sixth Patriarch on the High Seat of the Treasure of the Law, otherwise known as The Platform Sutra of Hui-neng. Thus it's reasonable to conclude that Hui-neng (638-713AD) was considered by succeeding generations of his countrymen as the greatest of the Ch'an Masters.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

The Gateless Gate

The Gateless Gate | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
Zen Stories ~
A philosopher asked Buddha: `Without words, without the wordless, will you you tell me truth?' The Buddha kept silence.
The philosopher bowed and thanked the Buddha, saying: `With your loving kindness I have cleared away my delusions and entered the true path.'
After the philosopher had gone, Ananda asked the Buddha what he had attained. The Buddha replied, `A good horse runs even at the shadow of the whip.'
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Daman Hongren - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Daman Hongren - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
Hongren was a brilliant Chan master and was significant in the development of early Chinese Chan. The teachings of both Daoxin and Hongren became known as the “East Mountain Teachings”, but Hongren was the more prominent of the two. He was held in high esteem by later Chan figures in the ancient capital cities of Chang'an and Luoyang in the early eighth century, when Chan moved from a rural base to the centre of Chinese power in the major urban areas and the imperial court. The East Mountain Teachings were seen as the “authentic” Chan Buddhist teachings, promoted by Hongren’s student, Shenxiu (神秀)(606?-706), the most prominent Buddhist monk of his time. Hongren’s significance can be noted by the fact that a compilation of his teachings, presumably shortly after his death, the Treatise on the Essentials of Cultivating the Mind, (Wade-Giles: Hsiu-hsin-yao lun; Japanese: Shūshinyō-ron) is the earliest collection of the teachings of a Chan master.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Ch'an Masters: Patriarchs and other great Zen masters of ancient China

Ch'an Masters: Patriarchs and other great Zen masters of ancient China | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
Bodhidharma is credited with bringing Gautama Buddha's teaching on sudden illumination from India to China circa 530 AD. Hui-neng identified him as the twenty-eighth patriarch or successor to the transmission of the dharma descending from Gautama Buddha, and the first patriarch in China.

After Bodhidharma came Hui K'o, who was succeeded by Seng-Ts'an, Tao-hsin, Hung-jen, and then Hui-neng. These six men are considered the Grand Masters or Patriarchs of Ch'an.

By the time Hui-neng became enlightened, the dhyana (meditation) sect had already split into two branches, with the school in northern China, and its teaching that the process of enlightenment is gradual, flourishing for a while under royal patronage.

After Hui-neng's death in 713 AD the southern school, with its emphasis on sudden illumination, continued to be very active. Among those Ch'an-na (Chinese pronunciation of dhyana) or Ch'an masters, Ma Tsu was one of the most important. Hui Hai became a student of Ma Tsu, eventually being referred to by the master as a "great pearl."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Amongst White Clouds - YouTube

Amongst White Clouds American director Edward A. Burger takes us on his unforgettable journey into the hidden lives of China's forgotten Zen Buddhist hermit ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Chinese Buddhism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chinese Buddhism (simplified Chinese: 汉传佛教; traditional Chinese: 漢傳佛教; pinyin: Hànchuán Fójiào) refers collectively to the various schools of Buddhism that have flourished in China since ancient times.[note 1] Buddhism has played an enormous role in shaping the mindset of the Chinese people, affecting their aesthetics, politics, literature, philosophy and medicine.

At the peak of the Tang Dynasty's vitality, Chinese Buddhism produced numerous spiritual masters.[1][2] Scholars classified Chinese buddhism into 7-15 schools,[3][4][5] commonly into 10 schools, called the Ten Schools of the Han Transmission of Buddhism (汉传佛教十宗).

After the turmoil of the Cultural Revolution, Chinese Buddhism is growing again, with ancient monasteries being rebuilt, and more people choosing to take ordination as monks and nuns.[6]

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Daoist Alchemy in the West: The Esoteric Paradigms

Daoist Alchemy in the West: The Esoteric Paradigms | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it

In America, scholarly and popular interest in “oriental religions” resulted in a Daoist representative attending the World’s Parliament of Religions held in Chicago in 1893. American interpreters also carried forth the theme of the universalist aspect of Daoism as illustrated in Samuel Johnson’s 1878 work on “oriental religions” in which a limited philosophical Daoism is shown to be a manifestation of a transcendental “universal religion” independent of any creed or dogma or rituals and united with the celebration of nature as found in the New England Transcendentalists. [17] By way of contrast, as early as 1853 the first Chinese temple was built in San Francisco and by 1900 there were over 400 such temples stretched along the American west coast, mixing popular Taoism, Buddhism and Confucianism. This living presence of Daoism was largely ignored by American scholars and mostly engaged by Chinese immigrants. [18] In 1912, C. H. Bjerregaard gave a series of lectures on The Inner Life and the Tao-Teh-King, discussing the mystical aspects of philosophical Daoism, at the American Theosophical Society; the lectures were then published by the Theosophical Society. Bjerregaard was a newly initiated member of Hazrat Inayat Khan's Sufi Order (Khan was a murshid of the Indian Chishti Order); this tentative relationship between Daoism and Islamic esotericism would be later developed in Europe and America (see below). This publication also marks the beginning of American interests in esoteric Daoism.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

The Zennist: Not by sitting

The Zennist: Not by sitting | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
Dogen doesn't even take into account that the Sixth Patriarch Hui-neng understood that truth is to realized by mind not by sitting or just sitting (shikantaza). The record shows that Hui-neng said: “The Truth is understood by the mind (hsin), and not by sitting (ts’o) in meditation" (Suzuki, The Zen Doctrine of No-Mind, 36)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Alan Watts Lectures and Essays

Alan Watts Lectures and Essays | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
Alan Watts (1915-1973) who held both a master's degree in theology and a doctorate of divinity, is best known as an interpreter of Zen Buddhism in particular, and Indian and Chinese philosophy in general.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

Hui Neng

Hui Neng | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
Hui Neng, known as the Sixth Patriarch of the School of Meditation (Ch'an) - also called the School of South or the School of Sudden Awakening - earned his nomination in a very original way.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by A Rosemont Journey
Scoop.it!

A Buddhist Bible: History of Ch'an Buddhism Previous to the Times of Hui-Neng (Wei-Lang)

A Buddhist Bible: History of Ch'an Buddhism Previous to the Times of Hui-Neng (Wei-Lang) | Chinese Esoteric Traditions | Scoop.it
A Buddhist Bible (1st ed.), by Dwight Goddard, at sacred-texts.com...
more...
No comment yet.