Cerebral Palsy News
31 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Wiley: Cerebral Palsy: Science and Clinical Practice - Bernard Dan, Margaret Mayston, Nigel Paneth, et al

Wiley: Cerebral Palsy: Science and Clinical Practice - Bernard Dan, Margaret Mayston, Nigel Paneth, et al | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

The only complete, scientifically rigorous, fully integrated reference giving a wide ranging and in-depth perspective on cerebral palsy and related neurodevelopment disabilities.  It considers all aspects of cerebral palsy from the causes to clinical problems and their implications for individuals. Leading scientists present the evidence on the role of pre-term birth, inflammation, hypoxia, endocrinological and other pathways. They explore opportunities for neuroprotection leading to clinical applications.

An international team of experts provides clinicians and researchers with key information on the mechanisms underlying impairments in movement, development, cognition, communication, vision, feeding, behaviour, sexuality, and musculoskeletal deformities.  


Read more: 

http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1909962384.html 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ZdravMedInfo from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Sesame provides touch-free smartphone control for people with disabilities

Sesame provides touch-free smartphone control for people with disabilities | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Sesame is a system designed specifically for users with only limited or no use of their hands. The device pairs head tracking software with some familiar hardware with the goal of bringing smartphone functionality to those who would otherwise be unable to make use of it.


Read more: 

http://www.gizmag.com/sesame-touch-free-smartphone/34742/



Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Cerebral Palsy - Challenges for the Future

Cerebral Palsy - Challenges for the Future | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Cerebral Palsy - Challenges for the Future. Edited by: Emira Svraka. ISBN 978-953-51-1234-1, Published 2014-03-19

Writing a comprehensive scientific book about the cerebral palsy is a great challenge. Many different interventions are available for persons with CP. Increasingly, it is recognized that intervention needs to be evidence-based and family-centered. Related therapies can offer improvement in some cases but do not offer a cure. Lifelong re/habilitation (habilitation and rehabilitation) in person with cerebral palsy is the first part of this book which has four chapters about management in children and adults with cerebral palsy through the life span, providing support and services. Three chapters of the second part are exploring the new therapy options which could improve the family quality of life. Third part has two chapters about complementary therapies with new possibilities for the future.

  Open access http://www.intechopen.com/books/cerebral-palsy-challenges-for-the-future 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Magnesium reduces cerebral palsy in infants delivered early preterm

Magnesium reduces cerebral palsy in infants delivered early preterm | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Among women with imminent delivery between 24 and 31 weeks gestation, those randomized to receive magnesium sulfate experienced a decreased risk of moderate or severe cerebral palsy.

Risk of fetal death did not differ between groups.


Read more: 

http://www.2minutemedicine.com/magnesium-reduces-cerebral-palsy-in-infants-delivered-early-preterm-classics-series 


Article:

 

A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Magnesium Sulfate for the Prevention of Cerebral Palsy

http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0801187 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Scientists identify potential cause for 40 per cent of pre-term births

Scientists identify potential cause for 40 per cent of pre-term births | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) and UCL (University College London) have identified what they believe could be a cause of pre-term premature rupture of the fetal membrane (PPROM), which accounts for 40 per cent of pre-term births (risk factor of CP), and is the main reason for infant death world-wide.

 Their findings have provided a new understanding of why pregnant women who have pre-term contractions go on to rupture their membranes early. The new project funded by the Rosetrees Trust could lead to a therapy that will heal the amniotic membrane and reduce preterm births. This has the potential to save many lives worldwide and improve the health and well-being of women during pregnancy and their families after birth.

The findings are extremely encouraging and show the value of conducting early stage research into biological mechanisms. This piece in the puzzle may lead to novel treatment strategies to reduce pre-term birth.


Read more: 

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-10-scientists-potential-cent-pre-term-births.html 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Adolescents with cerebral palsy report similar quality of life to their able-bodied peer

Adolescents with cerebral palsy report similar quality of life to their able-bodied peer | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Adolescents with cerebral palsy face multiple challenges, but they rate their quality of life on a par with their able-bodied peers, according to new research published in The Lancet reporting on how adolescents with cerebral palsy from nine European countries.

 

Read more:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-10-adolescents-cerebral-palsy-similar-quality.html 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Does Magnesium Help Prevent Cerebral Palsy?

Does Magnesium Help Prevent Cerebral Palsy? | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

From collectively pooling data from five large trials carried out around the world over the past 20 years, we know that magnesium sulfate given under strict medical protocols in hospital to women threatening to deliver preterm reduces the risk of cerebral  palsy in their children in early childhood.  Following  from this knowledge, magnesium sulfate is now given routinely to women, under strict medical conditions, who are threatening to deliver very early in Australia, and in other parts of the world, to try to prevent cerebral palsy in their child.  What we do not know is if magnesium sulfate used this way has any longer-term effects on the brain or on other important outcomes.

One of the initial studies that contributed to the overall evidence about cerebral palsy was carried out in Australia and New Zealand and completed more than 10 years ago.  Over 1000 women and their babies were enrolled in that study and although the rate of cerebral palsy was not substantially reduced by magnesium sulfate in our study, we showed that there were fewer children at 2 years of age who were not walking in the group whose mothers were given magnesium compared with those whose mothers were given placebo.  With this knowledge, and given the unknown longer-term benefits or risks, we re-evaluated the children from our study at school-age, between 6-11 years of age.  We thoroughly evaluated their brain function, including movement and co-ordination, thinking ability, behaviour, and school progress, as well as general health and well-being.  The basic message from our longer-term study is that magnesium sulfate, as used in our trial, does not have any substantial benefits or harms on brain or cognitive function, or any other outcome at school age.

 

Read more:

http://medicalresearch.com/general-medicine/does_magnesium_help_prevent_cerebral_palsy/7544/

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Cerebral palsy may be inherited, research suggests

Cerebral palsy may be inherited, research suggests | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Research finds cerebral palsy, a disability of the brain linked to problems in pregnancy or birth, may have an inherited cause.

Researchers in Norway found families where a close relative has cerebral palsy are at increased risk of giving birth to a child with the condition.

 

Read more:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-16/new-research-suggests-cerebral-palsy-may-be-inherited/5600858 ;

 

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-09-cerebral-palsy-hereditary.html ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Cooling babies 'halts brain damage'

Cooling babies 'halts brain damage' | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it
Cooling babies deprived of oxygen at birth improves their chances of growing up without disabilities such as cerebral palsy, research suggests.

The New England Journal of Medicine study showed newborns given the treatment were more likely to have higher IQs at school age.

Babies were placed on a special mat and cooled at 33C for three days to help reduce brain injury.

Experts say the study confirms the therapy has long-lasting effects.

 

Read more:

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-28243578 ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Rice seniors create Bluetooth enabled device to improve Cerebral Palsy therapy - iMedicalApps

Rice seniors create Bluetooth enabled device to improve Cerebral Palsy therapy - iMedicalApps | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

DeXcellence is a Bluetooth enabled device created by a group of five Rice University seniors to improve dexterity in cerebral palsy patients.

The students designed the device for their capstone project in collaboration with the Shriners Hospital for Children in Houston.

The device consists of a board marked with targets and a peg containing sensors to capture its location, speed and orientation. Bluetooth is used to send the data captured by the sensors to a computer. The data is then translated to useful metrics that a therapist can use to measure the progress of occupational therapy.

 

Read more:

http://www.imedicalapps.com/2014/06/rice-bluetooth-device-cerebral-palsy-therapy/ 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Cerebral palsy breakthrough allows doctors to diagnose at birth, begin treatment early

Cerebral palsy breakthrough allows doctors to diagnose at birth, begin treatment early | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Australian researchers will present what they say is a breakthrough in the diagnosis and treatment of cerebral palsy to a conference in Vienna on Friday.

The new method allows doctors to identify the disability at birth, rather than waiting up to 19 months to begin treatment.

 

Read more: 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-07-01/cerebral-palsy-breakthrough-allows-doctors-to-diagnose-at-birth/5562694

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by ZdravMedInfo from hOT News (Helen's OT News)
Scoop.it!

Wizzybug - paediatric powered wheelchair - Designability

Wizzybug - paediatric powered wheelchair - Designability | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Fun powered wheelchair designed for children under five. Addresses needs of children with cerebral palsy, spinal muscular atrophy, spina bifida etc..

Even those as young as 18 months can operate its simple controls, allowing them to zip around with their peers, developing spatial awareness, social interaction and independence. It can be used indoors and out of doors in accessible areas such as level gardens, playgrounds and parks, enabling children to enjoy the experience of mobility with their “first wheels”.

The Wizzybug addresses the needs of children with conditions such as cerebral palsy, spinal muscular atrophy, spina bifida and muscular dystrophy.

 

Source: 

http://www.designability.org.uk/product/wizzybug/ 

.


Via Helen OTUK
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Voiceitt

Voiceitt | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Voiceitt, an Israeli startup developing voice-translation technology for the disabled, was picked as the audience favorite at a startup showcase at the WSJD Live conference.

The company’s translation app, Talkitt, is being tested and is expected to be released in the second quarter of next year, according to Rabea Ziuod, Voiceitt’s vice president for business development in the Middle East and North Africa. It will enter a field where a number of technologies aim to help people with disabilities better communicate with others.

Mr. Ziuod, an Israeli Arab from Tel Aviv, has a personal stake in the success of the technology: two of his five siblings have cerebral palsy and struggle with their speech. “My vision is to bridge the gap between people with disabilities and their communities,” he said.

A video of the app in action shows a boy struggling to say “I love you,” and the app translating his words into intelligible speech. The app works by learning the user’s speech patterns, and Voiceitt hopes it will work for suffers of ALS, autism, Parkinson's disease and other conditions.

 

Source:

http://online.wsj.com/articles/voiceitt-is-chosen-audience-favorite-at-wsjd-live-startup-showcase-1414596993 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

State-of-the-Art Rehabilitation Strategies in Children with Cerebral Palsy - HCPLive

State-of-the-Art Rehabilitation Strategies in Children with Cerebral Palsy - HCPLive | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

During the Presidential Symposium at the 43rd Annual Child Neurology Society Meeting, held in Columbus, OH, October 22-25, Darcy Fehlings, MD, MSc, FRCP(C) reviewed the current state of the art in rehabilitation strategies for children with cerebral palsy, focusing on three “motor” interventions: constraint therapy, botulinum toxin therapy, and interactive computer play.


Read more at: http://www.hcplive.com/conferences/cns-2014/State-of-the-Art-Rehabilitation-Strategies-in-Children-with-Cerebral-Palsy

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Communication Unbound - Tobii I-Series

Communication Unbound - Tobii I-Series | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

The Tobii I-12 and Tobii I-15 are speech generating devices that enable effective communication in all forms.

http://www.tobii.com/en/assistive-technology/global/products/hardware/tobii-i-series/ 

Communicating with cerebral palsy :

The technology works through a camera that tracks where the user's eyes are looking, enabling him or her to move the mouse pointer around and click by blinking or staring.

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/284631.php 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Twin with cerebral palsy can learn to walk through copying her twin sister

Twin with cerebral palsy can learn to walk  through copying her twin sister | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Felicity Williams, four, from Walsall, was diagnosed with cerebral palsy at birth and wasn't walking by 18 months. A scan revealed she had a form of brain damage that lead to cerebral palsy. She has difficulty moving, and communication and learning difficulties. Despite this, she has learned to roll over, sit up, talk and walk. She has done so through copying her twin sister Tiffany, also four. Her parents have been surprised by her progress and credit the twins' bond



Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2784982/Twin-4-cerebral-palsy-astonishes-parents-learning-walk-talk-copying-twin-sister.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Computer models help cerebral palsy patients step out

Computer models help cerebral palsy patients step out | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

“Cerebral palsy affects parts of the brain that control movement, therefore affecting a person's posture and muscle coordination.

University of Queensland researchers are using computer modelling to predict the most effective way to help cerebral palsy patients walk and move more easily.

Dr Glen Lichtwark from the Centre for Sensorimotor Performance at UQ’s School of Human Movement Studies is simulating and predicting how surgery, strength training and other treatments could improve patients’ muscle function.

 

Read more:

http://www.uq.edu.au/news/article/2014/09/computer-models-help-cerebral-palsy-patients-step-out ;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

How do you help children regain control of their bodies? - USC News

How do you help children regain control of their bodies? - USC News | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Children with severe cerebral palsy are often placed in wheelchairs, have difficulty speaking and do not have full use of their hands, as the muscles are rigid and tense. In many ways, they are prisoners in their own bodies.

But someday it will all be different. Children with cerebral palsy, dystonia and other movement disorders will regain control of their bodies with the help of artificial spinal cords, controllable prosthetics and exoskeletons, thanks in part to the work of Professor Terence Sanger from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. In his lab, researchers build computer models of nerve and muscle networks and create devices that measure muscle activity.

 

Read more 

https://news.usc.edu/66000/how-do-you-help-children-regain-control-of-their-bodies/ 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Researchers find early predictor for preeclampsia

Researchers find early predictor for preeclampsia | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

University of Iowa researchers have discovered a biomarker that could give expecting mothers and their doctors the first simple blood test to reliably predict that a pregnant woman may develop preeclampsia, at least as early as 6 weeks into the pregnancy.

Preeclampsia is a cardiovascular disorder generally occurring late in pregnancy and often resulting in an early delivery, creating immediate and potentially lifelong risks to both mother and baby. "Preeclampsia is a horrible hypertensive disorder of pregnancy that can be very dangerous to both the mother and the baby. Preeclampsia can cause liver failure, kidney failure, seizures, and death. Babies born to preeclamptic moms are also at increased lifetime risk for heart attacks, stroke, diabetes [and cerebral palsy].

What the researchers found was that maternal plasma copeptin – an inert, stable biomarker of vasopressin secretion with a substantially longer half-life in the blood than vasopressin – is a clinically useful biomarker that predicts preeclampsia. 

 

Read more:  

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-07-early-predictor-preeclampsia.html

 

ZdravMedInfo's insight:

Pre-eclampsia poses cerebral palsy risk for premature and small babies.

Source: http://group.bmj.com/group/media/latest-news/pre-eclampsia-poses-cerebral-palsy-risk-for-premature-and-small-babies;

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Maternal infections associated with increased risk of cerebral palsy

By: NASEEM S. MILLER, Ob.Gyn. News Digital Network,  JUNE 13, 2014

Key clinical finding: The association between maternal infections and increased risk of CP could be a call for public health interventions, such as higher rate of flu vaccination for pregnant women.

Major finding: Pregnant women who were hospitalized with diagnosis of chorioamnionitis had a fourfold increase in risk of having a child with cerebral palsy (CP), while genitourinary and respiratory infections increased that risk by twofold, each.

Data source: Analysis of California birth records from 1991 to 2001, and records of all children receiving services for CP from the California Department of Developmental Services through 2006.

 

Read more:

http://www.obgynnews.com/home/article/maternal-infections-associated-with-increased-risk-of-cerebral-palsy/1ccacde53efc5218d772c675cf3329a9.html

 

 

More info+video:

http://www.familypracticenews.com/news/video-library/single-article/video-bottom-line-on-maternal-infections-and-cerebral-palsy/b36a769ed22557b6ee031323ce0f8a51.html

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Could babies fight cerebral palsy with their own blood?

Could babies fight cerebral palsy with their own blood? | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

MELBOURNE researchers have singled out three types of stem cells in the cord blood, as they prepare to trial giving Victorian babies back their own umbilical blood in the hope of preventing cerebral palsy.

Pre-clinical studies at the Ritchie Centre, part of the MIMR-PHI Institute of Medical Research, found that giving cord blood back to newborn animals in their first 12 hours of life, can help prevent brain damage caused by birth asphyxia.

Read more:
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/victoria/could-babies-fight-cerebral-palsy-with-their-own-blood/story-fni0fit3-1226944387478

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by ZdravMedInfo
Scoop.it!

Cerebral Palsy Infographic

Cerebral Palsy Infographic | Cerebral Palsy News | Scoop.it

Our cerebral palsy infographic explains the different types, causes and warning signs of cerebral palsy.

 

Source: http://www.childbirthinjuries.com/resources/cerebral-palsy-infographic#top

 

more...
No comment yet.