Center for Blended Learning
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Center for Blended Learning
Nurturing global children through 21st Century Literacies and flexible learning spaces. http://www.facebook.com/centerforblendedlearning
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Blended Learning: Education beyond the classroom

Blended Learning: Education beyond the classroom | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

RAPPLER contributor Ime Morales writes about a school that responds to the needs of today's generation of learners...

"On the one hand, part of it is similar to the structured classroom teaching by certified educators, which traditional parents still favor. On the other hand, a greater part of it allows for parents — who are supposed to know the child better and more deeply — to step in and nurture the child’s natural talents by finding teachable moments in their daily lives.

 

Blended learning addresses the observed disadvantages found in traditional schooling: too many students, too few mentors, lack of focus and time for each child, difficulty in addressing individual needs and development and the cookie-cutter teaching solutions that are failing on so many levels.

 

Critics of homeschooling might also find plenty of a-ha moments in blended learning, e.g., socialization and communication issues are not a problem among blendies, the nickname for blended learners."



Read more: http://www.rappler.com/life-and-style/8826-blended-learning-education-beyond-the-classroom ;

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A New Education For Business Leaders For A New Future

A New Education For Business Leaders For A New Future | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"Never before has a generation needed or had access to more tools to take on the real work that needs to be done in our societies. New leaders are emerging who are less willing to define themselves with a job title than their ability to create value wherever they are. In response, hundreds of new higher educational programs have emerged that focus on creativity and preparing students to solve the world’s big problems.

This is because education is shifting from a focus on what works for teachers to a focus on what students need to succeed and thrive. Businesses learned this long ago, with the emergence of the “consumer-driven” paradigm--a self-evident revelation that’s easier to agree with than it is to execute. When education serves students, many of the old beliefs become obsolete; schools that considered themselves competitors become partners by sharing content, faculty and facilities, combining strengths, offering more customized learning, and making life more interesting for all involved."

Read more: http://www.fastcoexist.com/1680196/a-new-education-for-business-leaders-for-a-new-future

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The Revolution: Top Ten Disruptors of Education

The Revolution: Top Ten Disruptors of Education | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"New online learning models are bursting from startups and top universities, bridging the educational divide.

 

We are in the midst of a revolution that will bring high-quality education to hundreds of millions of people who have never had access to this level of learning before.

 

These tools will reach those in developing cities and countries but also foment a revolution in the U.S. classroom as they change our perception of what learning can be."


Read more: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jack-hidary/online-distance-learning_b_1493319.html ;

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Blended Learning Wins Out in Calif. E-Learning Census

Blended Learning Wins Out in Calif. E-Learning Census | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

The first eLearning census from the California Learning Resource Network paints a picture of online learning in the Golden State and reaffirms national trends.

"The National Center for Education Statistics study helped give a better idea of the national landscape of online learning, and the California Learning Resource Network's effort has been valuable as a state-level picture, Watson said.


California eCensus results show that 45 percent of school districts and charters offer some online learning options. Bridges didn't expect that number to be so high.


Most of them take the blended learning approach, a combination of face-to-face and online instruction. And a smaller number offer online classes full-time.

"What we are seeing is that fully online is an important part of the landscape, but blended [learning] is going to be, and already is, a larger number of students," Watson said."

 
Read more: http://www.convergemag.com/classtech/Blended-Online-Learning-California.html

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TEDxNYED - April 28, 2012 - Tony Wagner

Schooling. Learning. There's a world of difference.

 

"Tony Wagner recently accepted a position as the first Innovation Education Fellow at the Technology & Entrepreneurship Center at Harvard. Prior to this, he was the founder and co-director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education for more than a decade. Tony consults widely to schools, districts, and foundations around the country and internationally. His previous work experience includes twelve years as a high school teacher, K-8 principal, university professor in teacher education, and founding executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility.

Tony is also a frequent speaker at national and international conferences and a widely published author. His work includes numerous articles and five books. Tony's latest, Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change The World, has just been published by Simon & Schuster to rave reviews. His 2008 book, The Global Achievement Gap has been an international best seller and is being translated into Chinese. Tony has also recently collaborated with noted filmmaker Robert Compton to create a 60 minute documentary, "The Finland Phenomenon: Inside The World's Most Surprising School System."

Tony earned an M.A.T. and an Ed.D. at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education."

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Noam Chomsky on the Purpose of Education

Noam Chomsky on the Purpose of Education | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"On the importance of having a framework for what matters when engaging with the the information economy — or, one might say, the essence of what great curation should be:


You can’t pursue any kind of inquiry without a relatively clear framework that’s directing your search and helping you choose what’s significant and what isn’t… If you don’t have some sort of a framework for what matters — always, of course, with the provisor that you’re willing to question it if it seems to be going in the wrong direction — if you don’t have that, exploring the Internet is just picking out the random factoids that don’t mean anything… You have to know how to evaluate, interpret, and understand… The person who wins the Nobel Prize is not the person who read the most journal articles and took the most notes on them. It’s the person who knew what to look for. And cultivating that capacity to seek what’s significant, always willing to question whether you’re on the right track — that’s what education is going to be about, whether it’s using computers and the Internet, or pencil and paper, or books.”

Read more: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/03/13/noam-chomsky-on-the-purpose-of-education/

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Nine Dangerous Things You Were Taught In School - Forbes

Nine Dangerous Things You Were Taught In School - Forbes | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

Be aware of the insidious and unspoken lessons you learned as a child. To thrive in the world outside the classroom, you’re going to have to unlearn them.

What Do You Think is the Most Dangerous Thing You Were Taught in School?

- The people in charge have all the answers
- Learning ends when you leave the classroom
- The best and brightest follow the rules
- What the books say is always true
- There is a very clear, single path to success
- Behaving yourself is as important as getting good marks
- Standardized tests measure your value
- Days off are always more fun than sitting in the classroom
- The purpose of your education is your future career

 Read more: http://www.forbes.com/sites/jessicahagy/2012/05/02/nine-dangerous-things-you-were-taught-in-school/

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Where’s the Joy in Learning?

Where’s the Joy in Learning? | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"Not surprisingly, play was a major source of joy in the classroom Rantala and Määttä observed (even when that play was not exactly what a teacher would wish: the researchers’ video camera caught one student fashioning a gun out of an environmental-studies handout). “Play is the child’s way of seeking pleasure,” the authors write, and it is a learning activity in itself; it shouldn’t be viewed as “a Trojan horse” in which to smuggle in academic lessons. Lastly, sharing and collaborating with other students is a great source of joy. One of the authors’ videotapes shows a student reacting with pleasure when a classmate, Paavo, says, “You are so good at making those dolls!”

The researchers conclude: “Joy experienced together, and shared, adds up to even more joy.”

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Five Ways Neuroscience Will Change Education | Our Kids Blog

Five Ways Neuroscience Will Change Education | Our Kids Blog | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

Neuroscience isn't just for scientists anymore. The way experts study how children's brains develop over time is changing education overall.

"Neuroscience is coming to the classroom. Or more accurately, our understanding of how a brain develops will change the way we teach, parent, and help our kids to grow and develop.


Over the last decade, our ability to study how the brain works has dramatically improved. Now, the research done by neuroscientists is coming out of the lab and into the classroom.

Here are five ways that education will be changed because of what we’ve learned about a child’s brain:

1. We’ll Start to Hear a Lot About “Neuroeducation”

In the future, we’ll hear a lot about neuroeducation, and we can expect to see curricula based not just on teaching subjects, but on preparing brains for learning.If you think of the brain as a tree with branches, neuroeducation is the process of adding more branches. If the brain has more branches, a child can learn faster, remember more and have improved IQ.Neuroscience has shown us that it’s possible to change the “wiring” of the brain (or to add more branches). This “rewiring” is based on something called neuroplasticity and we’ll hear a lot more about it in the years ahead."

Read more: http://www.ourkids.net/blog/brain-power-ways-neuroscience-will-change-education-21334/

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Can Innovation Skills Be Learned?

Can Innovation Skills Be Learned? | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"But here's the problem: It is often difficult in our society to "act differently in order to think differently." To do so requires radically altering our adult behaviors. When Dyer and Gregersen were interviewed in a blog about their research, Hal Gregersen talked about the loss of creative capacity. "If you look at four-year-olds, they are constantly asking questions and wondering how things work. But by the time they are 6½ years old, they stop asking questions because they quickly learn that teachers value the right answers more than provocative questions. High school students rarely show inquisitiveness. And by the time they're grown up and are in corporate settings, they have already had the curiosity drummed out of them. 80% of executives spend less than 20% of their time on discovering new ideas. Unless, of course, they work for a company like Apple or Google."

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/creating-innovators-tony-wagner?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=post&utm_content=blog&utm_campaign=innovationlearned

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Above And Beyond

"Created through collaboration by members of Partnership for 21st Century Skills and the talented folks at FableVision, Above & Beyond is a story about what is possible when communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity take center stage in schools and transform learning opportunities for all kids."

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Multi-tasking comes easier to bilingual kids: study

Multi-tasking comes easier to bilingual kids: study | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"Children who grow up learning two languages are better at multi-tasking but slower at building vocabulary than their monolingual peers, two Canadian psychologists have found."

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The Benefits of Bilingualism

The Benefits of Bilingualism | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"SPEAKING two languages rather than just one has obvious practical benefits in an increasingly globalized world. But in recent years, scientists have begun to show that the advantages of bilingualism are even more fundamental than being able to converse with a wider range of people. Being bilingual, it turns out, makes you smarter. It can have a profound effect on your brain, improving cognitive skills not related to language and even shielding against dementia in old age. This view of bilingualism is remarkably different from the understanding of bilingualism through much of the 20th century. Researchers, educators and policy makers long considered a second language to be an interference, cognitively speaking, that hindered a child’s academic and intellectual development.

They were not wrong about the interference: there is ample evidence that in a bilingual’s brain both language systems are active even when he is using only one language, thus creating situations in which one system obstructs the other. But this interference, researchers are finding out, isn’t so much a handicap as a blessing in disguise. It forces the brain to resolve internal conflict, giving the mind a workout that strengthens its cognitive muscles."

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/18/opinion/sunday/the-benefits-of-bilingualism.html?_r=1&src=ISMR_AP_LO_MST_FB

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Your Child Will Never Compete In The Global Market Unless You Do This

Your Child Will Never Compete In The Global Market Unless You Do This | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"The global marketplace is expanding at a phenomenal rate. Yet, the American education system is moving at the pace of molasses to meet the ever-changing needs.


Presently, the United States sits at the top rank of the world’s economy, but it isn’t a comfortable position. By 2020, everything may change – emerging markets are set to become a pivotal part of global economics, and China is on track to tackle the US and take the top spot from our fumbling hands.


What does all of this mean?

It means that if our education system doesn’t change with the times, our children will no longer have the ability to compete with the strength we once had in the global market.

1. Competition will be stronger

2. The dollar will be weaker

3. Unemployment will be higher

But what can we do about it?"

Read more: http://moneyning.com/kids-and-money/your-child-will-never-compete-in-the-global-market-unless-you-do-this/
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Envisioning the future of technology

Envisioning the future of technology | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

We may not fully grasp what will happen but it's good to have an idea of what the experts are speculating on about emerging technologies.

 

65% of today's grade school kids will end up at jobs that haven't been invented yet.- US Dept of Labor. Futurework-Trends and Challenges for the in the 21st Century

 

"Over time, education becomes a continuous, interconnected effort, allowing students to cope with a perpetually changing world."- TFE Research and Michell Zappa

 

Read more: http://envisioningtech.com/education/

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21 Things That Will Be Obsolete by 2020

21 Things That Will Be Obsolete by 2020 | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

Mirror, mirror on the wall...which of these predictions will surely come true?

"Inspired by Sandy Speicher’s vision of the designed school day of the future, reader Shelly Blake-Plock shared his own predictions of that ideal day. How close are we to this? The post was written in December 2009, and Blake-Plock says he’s seeing some of these already beginning to come to fruition.


1. DESKS
The 21st century does not fit neatly into rows. Neither should your students. Allow the network-based concepts of flow, collaboration, and dynamism help you rearrange your room for authentic 21st century learning..."


For 20 other things...read more http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2011/03/21-things-that-will-be-obsolete-by-2020/

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The Heart of Innovation: Skillset vs. Mindset

The Heart of Innovation: Skillset vs. Mindset | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"Bottom line, if you want to jump start innovation -- in your self, in your team, or your company, begin paying more attention to mindset. Be willing to make the effort required to help yourself and others enter into the frame of mind most conducive to innovating.

Because in the end, it's less about where you're going, than where you're coming from."

Read more: http://www.ideachampions.com/weblogs/archives/2012/06/post_96.shtml

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Future Learning: How do we make learning relevant to students?

"Students are the future, but what's the future for students? To arm them with the relevant, timeless skills for our rapidly changing world, we need to revolutionize what it means to learn. Education innovators like Dr. Sugata Mitra, visiting professor at MIT; Sal Khan, founder of Khan Academy; and Dr. Catherine Lucey, Vice Dean of Education at UCSF, are redefining how we engage young minds for a creatively and technologically-advanced future. Which of these eduvators holds the key for unlocking the learning potential inside every student?"

Read more: http://www.good.is/post/good-video-how-do-we-make-learning-relevant-to-students/ ;

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Teaching to the Test is not Education

Teaching to the Test is not Education | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"Teaching to the test has turned out to be profitable for the private business sector. Who knew? In a New York Times article, A Very Pricey Pineapple, Gail Collins (April 2012) pointed out that school testing provides huge corporate profits, led by Pearson Assessment Group who has…a five-year testing contract with Texas that’s costing the state taxpayers nearly half a billion dollars. However, we’ve long known that testing does little to reveal student learning. At the same time, the over-emphasis on testing has caused considerable collateral damage in many schools and to many students."

Read more: http://parentinvolvementmatters.org/articles/teaching-to-the-test-is-not-education-103.html

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21st Century Learning Tipping Point – When? | Innovation Management

21st Century Learning Tipping Point – When? | Innovation Management | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

The legacy of the industrial education model is strong. There is little dispute that the model must change at a system level, but progress towards and evolution of the needed changes are still glacially slow.

"The tipping point is near.

Why is this important?


The shape of 21st century learning is starting to emerge today, thanks to the efforts of innovators across the world, who are beginning to build its key elements of structure, process and systems.


The biggest challenge today is in changing the minds of those now in power in our schools, universities, colleges and in government. Agreeing that change is necessary is one thing, but being willing to provide the investment, commitment and time necessary to make major widespread changes to the industrial education model that all these decision makers grew up with is not straightforward.


Thinking about educational change from a global perspective is needed to allow us to let go of our now outdated beliefs about education models that are creaking under the weight of change. Only then will the isolated efforts of educators across the world gain enough support and acceptance to reach the tipping point needed to send the education world into the new learning space."

Read more: http://www.innovationmanagement.se/2012/05/02/21st-century-learning-tipping-point-when/

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Why are homeschooled kids so annoying? | Catholic Exchange | Page 2

Why are homeschooled kids so annoying? | Catholic Exchange | Page 2 | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

When we started considering homeschooling, folks weren't worried that my children might not learn enough. No, the biggest concern was always: SOCIALIZATION!

"If, on the other hand, they’re able to cultivate their interests, learn to be comfortable in their own quirky skin, encouraged to achieve as much as their little over-achieving hearts desire, they’ll enter adulthood with the confidence to continue on that path. They won’t automatically wonder if people will disagree or make fun of them when they make assertions or cling to ideals. And if those people do disagree or make fun of them they won’t care. Because they’re not kids anymore. They’re all grown up!

Of course, not every homeschooled kid is like that. Not even every one of the kids who lives in this house is like that. But no one asks the “normal” kids and adults if they were homeschooled. It doesn’t cross their minds. Because they’re so, you know, normal.


But the homeschooled kids who are like that, who are “annoying” are so different, so confident, so willing to allow themselves to be something that the majority of society has labeled as weird, that people can’t help but paint all homeschooled families with the weirdo brush. Because shouldn’t kids like that want to keep their mouths shut and keep their opinions to themselves?

And that’s why homeschooled kids are so annoying. Because no one tells them that the way God made them isn’t cool enough."

http://catholicexchange.com/why-are-homeschooled-kids-so-annoying/

Find out why we love being a Blendie at Kids Ahoy! http://www.facebook.com/centerforblendedlearning

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How Schools Can Teach Innovation

How Schools Can Teach Innovation | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"In most high-school and college classes, failure is penalized. But without trial and error, there is no innovation. Amanda Alonzo, a 32-year-old teacher at Lynbrook High School in San Jose, Calif., who has mentored two Intel Science Prize finalists and 10 semifinalists in the last two years—more than any other public school science teacher in the U.S.—told me, "One of the most important things I have to teach my students is that when you fail, you are learning." Students gain lasting self-confidence not by being protected from failure but by learning that they can survive it.

The university system today demands and rewards specialization. Professors earn tenure based on research in narrow academic fields, and students are required to declare a major in a subject area. Though expertise is important, Google's director of talent, Judy Gilbert, told me that the most important thing educators can do to prepare students for work in companies like hers is to teach them that problems can never be understood or solved in the context of a single academic discipline. At Stanford's d.school and MIT's Media Lab, all courses are interdisciplinary and based on the exploration of a problem or new opportunity. At Olin College, half the students create interdisciplinary majors like "Design for Sustainable Development" or "Mathematical Biology."

Learning in most conventional education settings is a passive experience: The students listen. But at the most innovative schools, classes are "hands-on," and students are creators, not mere consumers. They acquire skills and knowledge while solving a problem, creating a product or generating a new understanding. At High Tech High, ninth graders must develop a new business concept—imagining a new product or service, writing a business and marketing plan, and developing a budget. The teams present their plans to a panel of business leaders who assess their work. At Olin College, seniors take part in a yearlong project in which students work in teams on a real engineering problem supplied by one of the college's corporate partners."

Read more: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304444604577337790086673050.html

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The future of education: Memorize or analyse? | ZDNet

The future of education: Memorize or analyse? | ZDNet | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

Where do technology and teaching methods fit in a digital world?

"The education system of the future needs to:

1. Cater to a different kind of learning emphasis. When information is so readily available, shouldn’t we shift to educating the next generation about how to interpret this information flow, instead of simply remembering it?


2. Prepare students for a technology-reliant economy. We do students a disservice by not keeping school curriculums up-to-date with the skills that are in demand within the labor force. Don’t just show them how to use Word — expand this learning in relation to the skills and knowledge that are already valuable to employers. An understanding of networks, programming, Internet research and project collaboration — there must be more emphasis placed on these skill sets.


3. Adapt to a different mode of thinking. Shorter concentration spans or not, Generation Y are known as multitasking job-hoppers, demanding flexibility in their daily lives. As such, if you plan to keep your Gen-Y employee, give them a few challenges and targets to keep them happy." 

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Educational Leadership:For Each to Excel:Preparing Students to Learn Without Us

Educational Leadership:For Each to Excel:Preparing Students to Learn Without Us | Center for Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner."

"Melanie McBride, a Toronto-based educator and researcher with Ryerson University's Experiential Design and Gaming Environments lab, echoes that sentiment.

Personal and autonomous learning is self-directed and self-selected according to the learner's own needs, preferences, and learning arrangements … Truly autonomous and personal learning means making our own choices about what we wish to play or learn with, whom we wish to learn with or from, where we want to do this learning, when we prefer to learn or play, and how we want to learn. (personal communication, October 3, 2011).


In other words, the truly personal, self-directed learning that we can now pursue in online networks and communities differs substantially from the "personalized" opportunities that some schools are opening up to students. Although it might be an important first step in putting students on a path to a more self-directed, passionate, relevant learning life, it may not bring about the true transformation that many see as the potential of this moment.
 

It's a potential summed up nicely in the white paper The Right to Learn (Anytime Anywhere Learning Foundation, 2011). The authors write,


We need to shift our thinking from a goal that focuses on the delivery of something—a primary education—to a goal that is about empowering our young people to leverage their innate and natural curiosity to learn whatever and whenever they need to. The goal is about eliminating obstacles to the exercise of this right—whether the obstacle is the structure and scheduling of the school day, the narrow divisions of subject, the arbitrary separation of learners by age, or others—rather than supplying or rearranging resources. (p. 6)" 

Read more: http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/feb12/vol69/num05/Preparing-Students-to-Learn-Without-Us.aspx ;

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