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27 easy ways to sleep better tonight

27 easy ways to sleep better tonight | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it
Put the alarm clock away, dim the lights and save the bedroom for certain activities only – here’s some ways to snooze easier this evening.

 

THE AVERAGE PERSON spends more than one third of his/her life asleep. But don’t be fooled — just because the body is sleeping doesn’t mean it’s slacking off.


During sleep, the body repairs itself so that when the alarm clock goes off, our bodies are renewed and refreshed. Tossing and turning all night can affect judgment, productivity, and the ability to retain information the next day. Over time, it can contribute to obesity, diabetes, and — of course — a chronic bad attitude. (Did someone wake up on the wrong side of the bed this morning?) So check out our list on how to sleep better tonight — and thank us in the morning.


Via The Learning Factor
Eunice Chu's insight:

A good article on sleep with easy steps to improve my sleep.

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Exercise as good as massage for sore muscles

Exercise as good as massage for sore muscles | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it

The aches and pains people suffer after working out more than usual can be relieved just as well by exercise as by massage, according to a new study.

"It's a common belief that massage is better, but it isn't better. Massage and exercise had the same benefits," said Lars Andersen, the lead author of the study and a professor at the National Research Center for the Working Environment in Copenhagen.

 

 


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10 New Things We've Learned About Stress

10 New Things We've Learned About Stress | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it

No one is immune to stress -- and science shows that how we react to it matters, too. A bevy of research has come out in the past year alone, illustrating how our dealings with stress -- whether it's how long we ruminate over a problem, or how exactly we react to a stressful event -- can affect our health. And not only that, new studies are also coming out showing the effect stress has on our physical health.

To properly grab stress by the horns, we must first understand it. Click through the slideshow for some new findings that have been uncovered over the past year. And be sure to check out our previous pieces on natural ways to deal with stress, and all the ways stress is harming our health.


Via The Learning Factor
Eunice Chu's insight:

Very helpful to me personally

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Randy Bauer's curator insight, April 4, 2013 12:49 PM

Continuing to treat the effects of stress(cardiovascular disease, diabetes, depression, low productivity, poor relationships, post trauma, etc.), instead of teaching the positive aspects of Well-Being will only add to the distress of our economy and social framework. How about teaching optimism and positive health strategies that promote gratitude, happiness and individual strengths. There are exercises and exercise, that can be introduced to all ages. Basic meditation, or breathing techniques that promote positive emotions, and physiological changes that promote health and it's positive outcomes.

The Learning Factor's comment, April 7, 2013 5:43 PM
Yes, agreed. Prevention is the aim. We are happy to share any information you have on the latest research/techniques for prevention with our readers.
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Stress Less, if you can

Stress Less, if you can | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it

Via University of San Francisco
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Interesting

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Can We Get By On 4 hours' Sleep?

Can We Get By On 4 hours' Sleep? | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it

Margaret Thatcher is famously said to have slept for only four hours a night. How easy is it to do a high-powered job on this amount of sleep?

Part of Margaret Thatcher's fearsome reputation came from how little she slept. She could get by on four hours a night, it has often been said.

Indefatigability became part of her mystique. She would keep her officials up working on a speech until two or three in the morning and then be up by five in time to listen to Farming Today.

"She slept four hours a night on weekdays," says Sir Bernard Ingham, her Downing Street press secretary. "I wasn't with her at weekends. I guess she got a bit more then."


Via The Learning Factor
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Something not to do!
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Anna Asp's curator insight, April 11, 2013 6:34 AM

As a procrastinating student, who often does everything in the very last minute, learning about sleep is important. This article talks about Margaret Thatcher, and how she seemingly got by on just 4 hours of sleep during weekdays. Churchill survived on 4 hours a night during the war, but he did take afternoon naps (much like myself.) In the world of business, sleep-less nights seem to be a token of success. To admit needing sleep is a sign of weakness. A professor at Loughborough University claims that there is no correct amount of sleep, as long as you feel refreshed in the morning. 

The Learning Factor's comment, April 11, 2013 5:53 PM
So glad that you have recognised the importance of a good sleep. It is not only the duration of hours that is important - it is also the quality of sleep. Nowadays there are some apps that can begin the process of investigation into your sleep quality however if you are looking for a technology that is medically/research-based take a look at Body Media. A great piece of equipment that analyses exercise, sleep etc. Good luck with your study!
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Making Your Transition To A Healthy Diet: Get Motivated!

Making Your Transition To A Healthy Diet: Get Motivated! | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it
Whilst an approximate 88% fail to keep their fitness New Year's Resolutions, many fail to understand the mental requirement in making any transition. Whilst eating healthier, training more frequent...
Eunice Chu's insight:

Helpful to keep up motivation to live a healthier life. The mentality behind it has to be strong and inspiring!

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Silviwinthrop's curator insight, March 22, 2013 1:55 PM

I think it is important to take small steps toward making changes. Celebrate each success and continue to set goals for yourself. 

 

3 places that motivation can come from are:

1. Being healthy for your family

2. Being able to do more of your goals because you have more energy

3. Surround yourself with positive people to get the support you need

 

As a Fitness Specialist, I get to help people get motivated and use it to accomplish the things that are important to them.

 

I love getting people healthy inside and out.

 

Love yourself, 

Silvi Winthrop

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4 Ways to Stop Stress Fast | The Dr. Oz Show

4 Ways to Stop Stress Fast | The Dr. Oz Show | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it
Is stress affecting your body? The answer to this question is a big “YES! The number-one complaint that I am hearing these days is: “I am under so much stress and it is causing me to overeat.
Eunice Chu's insight:

Stress affects all aspects of health - fitness, sleep, diet. Being able to control and manage my stress will help with my healthy living plan in more than one ways

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Cameron's comment, May 30, 2013 2:14 PM
My Thoughts
Cameron's curator insight, May 30, 2013 2:15 PM

My thoughts

I think this article does a great job at explaining how stress effectts the body in a negative way. It does a great job explaining what stress really is and where it comes from and how to get rid of it.

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Reaping Benefits of Exercise Minus the Sweat

Reaping Benefits of Exercise Minus the Sweat | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it

 

A team led by researchers at Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institutehas isolated a natural hormone from muscle cells that triggers some of the key health benefits of exercise. They say the protein, which serves as a chemical messenger, is a highly promising candidate for development as a novel treatment for diabetes, obesity, and perhaps other disorders, including cancer.

 

Bruce Spiegelman, a cell biologist at Dana-Farber, is senior author of the report, posted as an advance online publication by the journal Nature. The first author is Pontus Bostrom, a postdoctoral fellow in the Spiegelman lab.

“It’s exciting to find a natural substance connected to exercise that has such clear therapeutic potential,” said Bostrom.


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Antidote for student stress

Antidote for student stress | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it

Promoting Animal Wellness Through Service


[via vanessaaaaaajoy]


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Interesting take on stress

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Why Pro Athletes Sleep 12 Hours A Day

Why Pro Athletes Sleep 12 Hours A Day | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it

If you thought your lazy, sullen teenager slept a lot, they've got nothing on your typical pro athlete, who routinely gets between 10-12 hours a night. Compare that to the average of 6.44 hours, and you've got to wonder why guys like Steve Nash or Roger Federer aren't endorsing a high-performance line of blankies instead of shoes.


But it's not simply because they're lazy, rich, and bored (though that probably contributes as well). Rather, it's that to perform at your physical peak, you basically have to sleep constantly -- after workouts, before games, before felonies, after felonies, and before hitting the clubs.


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Julien Cuyeu's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:35 PM

Well at some point in my collegiate  career of cross country and track I will go pro and experience getting 9 to 10 hours of sleep.  

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Hard-Wired to Hate Exercise?

Hard-Wired to Hate Exercise? | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it
Discipline and motivation aside, researchers are looking at the physiological reasons behind why some people enjoy exerting themselves and others don't.

When it comes to exercise, many people seem to fall into two distinct camps: those who love a vigorous, sweat-soaked workout and those who view it as a form of torment

With hopes of getting more people up and moving, scientists are looking at the body's biological and chemical processes for clues to understanding what's behind differing attitudes toward exercise. That could mean there are factors beyond motivation and discipline to explain why some people enjoy exercising and others don't.


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
Eunice Chu's insight:

Interesting perspective. May be able to help me get over my laziness:)

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27 easy ways to sleep better tonight

27 easy ways to sleep better tonight | CE Healthy Living Research | Scoop.it
Put the alarm clock away, dim the lights and save the bedroom for certain activities only – here’s some ways to snooze easier this evening.

 

THE AVERAGE PERSON spends more than one third of his/her life asleep. But don’t be fooled — just because the body is sleeping doesn’t mean it’s slacking off.


During sleep, the body repairs itself so that when the alarm clock goes off, our bodies are renewed and refreshed. Tossing and turning all night can affect judgment, productivity, and the ability to retain information the next day. Over time, it can contribute to obesity, diabetes, and — of course — a chronic bad attitude. (Did someone wake up on the wrong side of the bed this morning?) So check out our list on how to sleep better tonight — and thank us in the morning.


Via The Learning Factor
Eunice Chu's insight:

A good article on sleep with easy steps to improve my sleep.

more...
No comment yet.