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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from Virology News
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Let's make a virus! » MicrobiologyBytes

Let's make a virus! » MicrobiologyBytes | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
A fully decompressed synthetic bacteriophage øX174 genome assembled and archived in yeast: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23079106 #viaGoogle+ Google+: R...

 

GREAT stuff!  Now, Darrin and Aderito - publish your one, for several deities' sake!


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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from Plants and Microbes
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Nature Reviews Microbiology: Microbial life in the phyllosphere (2012)

Nature Reviews Microbiology: Microbial life in the phyllosphere (2012) | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it

Our knowledge of the microbiology of the phyllosphere, or the aerial parts of plants, has historically lagged behind our knowledge of the microbiology of the rhizosphere, or the below-ground habitat of plants, particularly with respect to fundamental questions such as which microorganisms are present and what they do there. In recent years, however, this has begun to change. Cultivation-independent studies have revealed that a few bacterial phyla predominate in the phyllosphere of different plants and that plant factors are involved in shaping these phyllosphere communities, which feature specific adaptations and exhibit multipartite relationships both with host plants and among community members. Insights into the underlying structural principles of indigenous microbial phyllosphere populations will help us to develop a deeper understanding of the phyllosphere microbiota and will have applications in the promotion of plant growth and plant protection.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Microbiology: A piece of the methane puzzle

Microbiology: A piece of the methane puzzle | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it

The identification of a sea-floor microorganism that single-handedly conducts anaerobic oxidation of methane changes our picture of how the flux of this greenhouse gas from the ocean to the atmosphere is regulated.

 

Link to Milucka's article :

Zero-valent sulphur is a key intermediate in marine methane oxidation

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature11656.html

 

 


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The Invisible Universe Of The Human Microbiome

The next time you look in a mirror, think about this: In many ways you're more microbe than human. There are 10 times more cells from microorganisms like bac...
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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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Life on cheese: Scientists explore the cheese rind microbiome

Life on cheese: Scientists explore the cheese rind microbiome | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
Bacteria and moulds are vital to the ripening and aroma of many cheeses.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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The parasite that manipulates a cricket's brain

The parasite that manipulates a cricket's brain | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
The hairworm is a long, thread-like parasite that sits bundled up inside the body of its host.

 

It grows so large that it takes up most of the room inside the host’s body, waiting for the right moment to come bursting out. But that is not the scariest thing about the parasite, because it can also survive a deep freeze (at -70°C) and go on to infect its favourite hosts,  some insects and crustaceans.

 

The adult hairworm (in the phylum Nematomorpha) is aquatic but in many species the worm develops inside land-loving insects. To ensure it does not dry up when it escapes from the innards of its host, it uses its first trick to manipulate the host. When the time has come for it to make an exit, the hairworm is able to tamper with the brain of its host (usually a cricket) and persuade it to seek out water, where the adult worm can escape and reproduce.

 

But the hairworm has a complex life cycle and the cricket is not the only host that it infects throughout its life. Before it gets into a cricket, this parasite starts out as an egg that hatches into a free-swimming larva, which then needs to infect an aquatic invertebrate, such as a snail or mosquito larva, to reach its next stage of development as a cyst. It then needs to be eaten by its final host - the cricket - where it matures into a long, thin worm, many times longer than the length of its host.

 

This process of getting into each of those hosts and waiting to encounter the next one may end up being dragged out over the course of an entire year. For hairworms that live in temperate regions of the world, the parasite is faced with a dilemma - there is a good chance that before it is able to end up in a cricket and develop into an adult worm, winter will arrive and everything will start freezing over.

 

But the hairworm Paragordius varius is not at all bothered by snow, ice and freezing conditions - it simply shrugs it all off and waits it out. In fact, arecent study showed that it can tolerate being frozen at -30°C or even -70°C for weeks. When it thaws out, it is still fully capable of infecting the next host.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Ed Yong: Suicidal wasps, zombie roaches and other parasite tales

We humans set a premium on our own free will and independence ... and yet there's a shadowy influence we might not be considering. As science writer Ed Yong ...
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Homebrew of fermentation: customize food for your microbiome

Intrigued by her grandmother's traditional pickles and sauerkraut, Jennifer Harris first started fermenting foods ten years ago. A couple years later her roo...
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NIH Human Microbiome Project: An Update - Eric Green

July 24-26, 2013 - Human Microbiome Science: Vision for the Future More: http://www.genome.gov/27554404.
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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from Virology and Bioinformatics from Virology.ca
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MicroMicrobe • Microbial image of the month This is a fabulous...

MicroMicrobe • Microbial image of the month This is a fabulous... | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
Microbial image of the month


This is a fabulous photograph of a bacteriophage (or phage), a virus that infects bacteria.

Via Naomi Osborne
Roy Cutler's insight:

What my students should bear in mind is how small this thing is and good the photograph given that size.

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Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics - Scientist

Soil Bacteria May “Eat” Antibiotics - Scientist | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
ScientistSoil Bacteria May “Eat” AntibioticsScientistLong-term exposure to antibiotics from agricultural run off may encourage the evolution of soil bacteria that break down and consume the antibacterial agents.
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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from MicrobiologyBytes
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Using viruses to beat superbugs #sgmdub

Using viruses to beat superbugs #sgmdub | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it

Viruses that can target and destroy bacteria have the potential to be an effective strategy for tackling hard-to-treat bacterial infections. The development of such novel therapies is being accelerated in response to growing antibiotic resistance, says Dr David Harper at the Society for General Microbiology's Spring Conference in Dublin.


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FOOD TECHNOLOGIST's curator insight, June 22, 2013 10:09 PM

Using viruses to beat superbugs

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Influenza animation

Animation of the mechanism of an influenza virus and how Crucell's antibodies target the HA1 proteins on the virus and prevent further spread of influenza.

 


Via Ed Rybicki, AJCann
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Nature Reviews Microbiology: Going back to the roots: the microbial ecology of the rhizosphere (2013)

Nature Reviews Microbiology: Going back to the roots: the microbial ecology of the rhizosphere (2013) | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it

The rhizosphere is the interface between plant roots and soil where interactions among a myriad of microorganisms and invertebrates affect biogeochemical cycling, plant growth and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress. The rhizosphere is intriguingly complex and dynamic, and understanding its ecology and evolution is key to enhancing plant productivity and ecosystem functioning. Novel insights into key factors and evolutionary processes shaping the rhizosphere microbiome will greatly benefit from integrating reductionist and systems-based approaches in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. Here, we discuss recent developments in rhizosphere research in relation to assessing the contribution of the micro- and macroflora to sustainable agriculture, nature conservation, the development of bio-energy crops and the mitigation of climate change.


Via Francis Martin, Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from Science News
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Microbiology: Bacterial communities as capitalist economies

Microbiology: Bacterial communities as capitalist economies | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it

Tracking the behaviour of bacteria as they group together on a surface reveals a 'rich-get-richer' mechanism in which polysaccharide deposition and cellular location amplify in a positive feedback loop.


Via Laran, Sakis Koukouvis
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16 Things That Affect Your Gut Bacteria | Mark's Daily Apple

16 Things That Affect Your Gut Bacteria | Mark's Daily Apple | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
A couple months ago, we explored many of the ways our gut bacteria affect us, focusing on the lesser known effects like anti-nutrient nullification, vitamin manufacture, and neurotransmitter production.
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10 Things You Need To Know About Your Microbiome

10 Things You Need To Know About Your Microbiome | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
If you had to name the most exciting recent medical discovery, what would you say? As a physician, I know my answer, hands down: the microbiome.
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The root microbiome influences scales from molecules to ecosystems: The unseen majority

Plants are teeming with microbial organisms including those that colonize internal tissues as well as those that adhere to external surfaces. In the rhizosphere, the plant-associated microbiome is intricately involved in plant health and serves as a reservoir of additional genes that plants can access when needed. Microbiome regulation of plant trait expression affects plant performance, which in turn influences various ecosystem functions, such as primary productivity and soil health. Understanding these plant- and microbe-driven interactions requires a study of the nature and effects of the plant microbiome. Conceptualizing the microbiome requires a synthesis of microbial ecology, physiology, and bioinformatics, integrated with insight into host biology and ecology. Microbiome structure and function analyses are recognized as essential components to understand the genetic and functional capacity of the host (previously assigned solely to the host) and include vital aspects of metabolism and physiology. Here, as a special section, we present a set of papers that address the complex interactions between plants and root microbiomes in the rhizosphere. This unseen majority spans scales; with its microorganisms numerically dominant in terrestrial ecosystems, the root microbiome is also involved in plant genetics through integral roles in plant trait expression that can effect community composition and ecosystem functions, such as soil health.


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Plant Breeding and Genomics News's curator insight, September 23, 2013 1:57 PM

Open access article from the American Journal of Botany's Root Microbiome special section .

Rescooped by Roy Cutler from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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How Parasites Take Over The Minds Of Animals And Turn Them Into Zombies

How Parasites Take Over The Minds Of Animals And Turn Them Into Zombies | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
Some species of viruses, fungi, protozoans, wasps, and tapeworms take over the brains and actions of the animals and insects they infect — making them do whatever their new master wants.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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'That's how horror movies begin': Scientists find 6,000 year old ...

'That's how horror movies begin': Scientists find 6,000 year old ... | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
Ancient parasite egg spotted in Syria dlvr.it/63CPvz— The Times of Israel (@TimesofIsrael) ... Scientists find 6,200-year-old parasite egg that now affects 200 million worldwide miamiherald.com/2014/06/19/418…— Alex Mena ...
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Enterome: the gut microbiome and its impact on our health

As humans, we live and draw resources from communities of people. Interestingly, our bodies also house their own complex communities of human cells and micro...
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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from CCV Microbiology
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MicroMicrobe • Microbial image of the month This is a fabulous...

MicroMicrobe • Microbial image of the month This is a fabulous... | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it
Microbial image of the month


This is a fabulous photograph of a bacteriophage (or phage), a virus that infects bacteria.

Via Naomi Osborne, Roy Cutler
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Roy Cutler's curator insight, February 6, 2013 10:36 AM

What my students should bear in mind is how small this thing is and good the photograph given that size.

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Biofilm: A New (Gross) Thing to Worry About

Slime can be great, but when it's the wrong kind of slime (you know, the kind that can kill you?), it gets added to the list of things Hank wishes he didn't ...
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Not Hank's best.  A tad alarmist but as always, entertaining and full of interesting tidbits. 

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New coronavirus can infect cells from multiple species - CIDRAP

CBC.caNew coronavirus can infect cells from multiple speciesCIDRAPChristian Drosten, MD, lead author of the study and director of the Institute of Virology at the University of Bonn Medical Centre in Germany, said in an ASM press release today, "This...
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Rescooped by Roy Cutler from Twisted Microbiology
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Where do new infectious diseases come from?

Where do new infectious diseases come from? | CCV Microbiology | Scoop.it

When new infectious diseases are discovered, one of the first questions is “where did this come from?” More often than not, the answer is one of our animal friends—a kind of disease called a zoonosis.

 

Article by @aetiology


Via Cesar Sanchez
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