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Fears grow for rise in food prices - CNN.com

Fears grow for rise in food prices - CNN.com | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
The increase in grain prices is already being felt around the world.
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CCs Geography News
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Curated by Joanne Wegener
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What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country

What the Social Progress Index can reveal about your country | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
The term Gross Domestic Product is often talked about as if it were “handed down from god on tablets of stone.” But this concept was invented by an economist in the 1930s. We need a more effective measurement tool to match 21st century needs, says Michael Green: the Social Progress Index. With charm and wit, he shows how this tool measures societies across the three dimensions that actually matter. And reveals the dramatic reordering of nations that occurs when you use it.

Via Geography Teachers Association of SA
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Geography Teachers Association of SA's curator insight, November 14, 7:02 AM

This fascinating and inspiring presentation is an excellent resource for Population Studies (Year 12) and Human Well-being (Year 10). The presenter presents interesting data on the relationship between GDP & Social Progress, and encourages governments to aspire to something more than just economic growth.

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The biggest estate on earth: how Aborigines made Australia

The biggest estate on earth: how Aborigines made Australia | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Aboriginal people worked hard to make plants and animals abundant, convenient and predictable. By distributing plants and associating them in mosaics, then using these to lure and locate animals, Aborigines…
Joanne Wegener's insight:

This extract from Bill Gammage's book reminds us of the role of Aboriginal people in shaping and transforming the Australian landscape. When we explore land cover transformations in Australia, we cannot ignore the fact that Aboriginal people were working with and "farming" the land long before Europeans arrived.

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Flying Miners

Flying Miners | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Exceptional and heartfelt stories of the men and women at the frontline of Australia's mining boom - the FIFOs - Fly In Fly Out miners.
Joanne Wegener's insight:

The Flying Miners series has been a fascinating insight into the lives of FIFO miners. With commentary from journalists, and a Economic & Social Geographer,  the stories of the FIFOs raises many interesting reflections from a geographical perspective.  Eg. Where are all of these miners traveling from (internal 'migration' patterns)how equally is wealth from the mining industry being distributed?  

 

The he following article is also an interesting read: http://www.news.com.au/finance/work/flying-miners-aussies-tell-us-what-its-really-like-inside-the-mining-boom/story-fnkgbb6w-1227090146216

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Catalyst: Tokyo Flood Prevention - ABC TV Science

Catalyst: Tokyo Flood Prevention - ABC TV Science | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Fifty metres under the teeming megacity of Tokyo lies a subterranean world - 6 4km of tunnels water tanks and massive pillars constructed to withstand 200 tons of water per second It’s an engineer
Joanne Wegener's insight:

This fascinating story examines the amazing infrastructure in place to prevent and mitigate major flooding in Tokyo. This is a great case study for anyone researching disaster management, and it also provides an insight into how a megacity manages its urban infrastructure.

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Rising sea levels to cost Australia billions, study says

Rising sea levels to cost Australia billions, study says | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Rising sea levels could threaten infrastructure worth more than Aus$226 billion (US$205 billion) in Australia if climate change is left unchecked, a study warned on Wednesday.

Via SustainOurEarth
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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, September 18, 10:14 PM

Costs of Climate change are often centred on the poor or those in rural areas. Here is evidence that it has the potential to affect the wealthy and the urban.

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Coca Cola, Heinz And Other Major Food Companies Warn Climate Change Threatens Business

Coca Cola, Heinz And Other Major Food Companies Warn Climate Change Threatens Business | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it

But as ThinkProgress noted at the time, the real story was not a guacamole shortage, but the emerging reality of doing business in a warming world. While politicians continue to bicker over whether or not climate change exists, companies now have no choice in the matter — they must acknowledge the science and the risk and disclose the reality of that risk to their investors’ pocketbooks. Whether that risk actually manifests itself is another matter, but the fact that companies are increasingly putting climate change on their threat lists speaks volumes to the severity of the problem.

 

Here are seven other big food companies that disclose to investors that climate change poses a threat to their products and bottom lines.


Via SustainOurEarth
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Garry Rogers's curator insight, September 15, 9:14 PM

Too bad these companies can't bankroll enough congressmen to oppose the fossil fuel industry.

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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Oldest and Youngest Populations

Oldest and Youngest Populations | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it

"There are 1.2 billion people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the world today — and that means that many countries have populations younger than ever before.  Some believe that this 'youth bulge' helps fuel social unrest — particularly when combined with high levels of youth unemployment.  Youth unemployment is a 'global time bomb,' as long as today’s millennials remain 'hampered by weak economies, discrimination, and inequality of opportunity.'  The world’s 15 youngest countries are all in Africa.  Of the continent’s 200 million young people, about 75 million are unemployed.

On the flip side, an aging population presents a different set of problems: Japan and Germany are tied for the world’s oldest countries, with median ages of 46.1. Germany’s declining birth rate might mean that its population will decrease by 19 percent, shrinking to 66 million by 2060. An aging population has a huge economic impact: in Germany, it has meant a labor shortage, leaving jobs unfilled."


Via Seth Dixon
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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:16 PM

APHG-U2

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:17 PM

Unit 2

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 11:05 AM

The extremely young median age seen across Africa hints at the problems found throughout the continent. This demographic factor suggests that there are other political, economic, and cultural problems that are influencing these young ages. It shows that most people do not live long lives, and even the older countries on the continent are younger than most other places. The only other place with low ages are the Middle East and Central Asia, and even their populations are several years older than the African continent.

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Why Dubai is Growing So Fast—And May Eventually Slow Down – Onward

Why Dubai is Growing So Fast—And May Eventually Slow Down – Onward | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
The Middle East's culture capital has made a big bet that in the future, most of the world will want to visit.
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Battle for Mosul Dam: a new age of water wars beckons

Battle for Mosul Dam: a new age of water wars beckons | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Exactly a year ago, the world was wrestling with the possibility of another US-led military assault on an Arab state, following the horrific gas attacks in Damascus, Syria. When US military action did…
Joanne Wegener's insight:

Water as a Resource - #conflict #dams

2013 was the Year of International Water Cooperation. It is unfortunate that despite global efforts to achieve water cooperation, others still choose to use "water as a weapon".

 

"In designating 2013 as the UN International Year of Water Cooperation, the UNGA recognizes that cooperation is essential to strike a balance between the different needs and priorities and share this precious resource equitably, using water as an instrument of peace. "

http://www.unwater.org/water-cooperation-2013/water-cooperation/en/


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Countries of the World

Countries of the World | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Can you name the countries of the world?
Joanne Wegener's insight:

A fun resource to use with students to test their knowledge of countries around the world.

Shared with me by one of my students.

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Watch a cocoa farmer try chocolate for the first time

Watch a cocoa farmer try chocolate for the first time | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
N'Da Alphonse grows cocoa in Ivory Coast. He harvests the pods, removes the pulp-covered beans, and dries them before selling them to brokers.
Joanne Wegener's insight:

This is a really interesting story. Assuming it is true, it raises interesting questions about the context of our knowledge & understanding, about the interconnections which occur between people around the globe, and about our individual perspectives in understanding global situations.

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The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided

The Berlin Wall fell 25 years ago, but Germany is still divided | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Stunning satellite images and maps show how east and west differ from each other even today.
Joanne Wegener's insight:

This article provides an interesting geographical perspective on the social divides that still exist between the east and west of Germany. Even though the physical barriers are gone, and technically it is a unified country, the social and economic divisions are still quite obvious from the data presented in this article.

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Built to burn: Inside a raging inferno

Built to burn: Inside a raging inferno | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
IT HAS been described as a ticking time bomb waiting to explode, and this year, like every other will be no different.
Joanne Wegener's insight:

Bushfires in Australia - a combination of perfect environmental conditions and human interaction with the natural environment. 

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Direct Action climate plan passes the Senate with help from Palmer United Party

Direct Action climate plan passes the Senate with help from Palmer United Party | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
The Abbott government finally succeeds in replacing the carbon tax with a policy of its own, after fierce opposition from Labor and the Greens.
Joanne Wegener's insight:

Climate Change policy continues to be a major issue for political parties in any country. Unfortunately, while politicians continue to debate and argue which is the "best" policy, is enough actually being done to reduce our carbon footprint?

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SA commits to 50pc renewable energy target

SA commits to 50pc renewable energy target | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
The SA Government says it wants half of the state's power to be generated by renewable sources by 2025.
Joanne Wegener's insight:

This is an interesting proposition.

At present (according to the CIA factbook), Australia gains 78% of its energy from fossil fuels.

This is an impressive commitment, and hopefully a commitment that will come to fruition for Australia.

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Pollution risks of megacity 'street canyons' examined in unique new research

Pollution risks of megacity 'street canyons' examined in unique new research | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
People living in Hong Kong's towering skyscrapers may be away from the hustle and bustle of its notorious traffic-snarled streets but the effects of traffic emissions should not be ignored, says a ground-breaking research project led by King's College London.

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Anatomy of a Smart City

Anatomy of a Smart City | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it

The 19th century was a century of empires, 20th century was a century of nation states and the 21st century will be a century of cities...

 

This outstanding infographic (courtesy of postscapes.com) begins with some information about our current state of urbanization.

 

Did you know that 1.3 million people are moving to cities each week?! It then explains the need for smart cities and delves into what is required to establish these intelligent connected environments, how the smart city may take various forms in the developing worlds and what specific technologies are necessary to achieve such grand goals in practice.


Via Lauren Moss, dilaycock
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Eli Levine's curator insight, December 18, 10:45 AM

There is an evolution taking place where politics, policy, technology, the environment, and the economy all intersect. This movement towards technical, empirically driven local policy making could be our saving grace.This could be the future of government.

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, December 19, 2:10 AM

A stunning infographic which predicts how urban living will change in this century.  Our age is truly becoming "a century of smart cities."  Exciting times lie ahead.  Aloha, Russ.

Paul Aneja - eTrends's curator insight, December 22, 6:51 PM

What do you think makes a smarter city?

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Why this Ebola outbreak became the worst we've ever seen

"The 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than sum total of all the previous outbreaks since the virus was first identified in 1976. This video explains how it got so bad."  


Via Seth Dixon
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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, October 6, 3:08 PM

It is very sad watching knowing how it took to so long to get Ebola out to the public and make it known of the very spreadable virus. It’s obvious how since the US can be at risk of getting the virus in our country they now want to make it very known and for people to be cautious of the idea that Ebola can eventually be in the US and spread. We should have been cautious of the virus many years ago, but the rate of the virus spreading, sky rocketed just this year. It’s obvious why it took so many years for the Ebola virus to be known, since it was just known for it to have been in a particular Sierra Leon and Liberia. Since it has spread from there to the border of Guinea and now potentially going to different parts of the world there is no question why there is a health scare in many countries.

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, October 28, 10:20 PM

In just a few months the Ebola virus has cumulated out of control. More people became affected and died in the last five months than all of the combined deaths that have occurred since Ebola was first discovered in 1976. Ebola began to spread from rural areas to a border region in West Africa when ill people traveled to the city to work or go to the market, making international spread likely. Mounting a campaign to increase awareness of the risks and to contain the virus was nearly impossible due to the low illiteracy rates. Consequently, health workers were taking ill people away from family and their homes to contaminate centers. This caused much fear and mistrust and was not successful. More people became infected and the snowball effect ensued. When people did show up at ill-equipped hospitals, there were not enough beds or free space and most were turned away. Some health workers walked off the job fearing being infected because of the poor conditions. No gloves, masks or gowns were provided and workers feared for their own health. The ill patients went back into the community and Ebola continued to spread. The response of the global community was not fast enough, and help did not arrive in time before the spread of Ebola became an epidemic. It is clear that in a world that is so closely connected, we must have a global heath system that works.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 5:32 PM

Ebola is getting worst every day. one of the things that has caused the spread of this virus is the fact that many working people cross the border to other regions to work or to go to market. Back in days, you used to see this Ebola issue in very rural areas, but now is getting worst. In these areas were the Ebola is getting worst, they do not count with a good health system. Sometimes there are day when they do not have gloves, gowns and mask, and because of that, there have been health care workers who have just walked away from their jobs because they do not want to put in risk their life. This  is a very sad situation, which I hope it get better.

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Why globalisation may not reduce inequality in poor countries

Why globalisation may not reduce inequality in poor countries | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
GLOBALISATION has made the planet more equal. As communication gets cheaper and transport gets faster, developing countries have closed the gap with their rich-world...
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Economic Growth Threatens World Languages

Economic Growth Threatens World Languages | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Many world languages may become extinct due to economic growth, a new study suggests. Already today, several of the world's nearly 7,000 languages face a serious risk of extinct...
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Lake Argyle suggested for development of Australia's north

Lake Argyle suggested for development of Australia's north | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Lake Argyle on the border of WA and the NT is suggested as the ideal spot for a Northern Australia capital.
Joanne Wegener's insight:

An interesting proposition for Northern Australia. It raises many questions relating to sustainability.

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World Vision Australia

World Vision Australia | CCs Geography News | Scoop.it
Joanne Wegener's insight:

A great teaching resource for the topic of urbanisation. 

World Vision creates & produces many valuable materials for teachers & students to explore issues of poverty, social justice & global connections

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