CCS and Instruction
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Rescooped by Ashley Vickery from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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The instructional implications for all teachers, not just those who specialize in English Language Arts, are enormous! | Language Magazine

The instructional implications for all teachers, not just those who specialize in English Language Arts, are enormous! | Language Magazine | CCS and Instruction | Scoop.it

By Margo Gotleib

Language Magazine


The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are transforming the way that reading is taught and assessed.


The complexity of texts associated with the CCSS exceeds the level of the reading material typically used in our schools.


New proficiency standards are more rigorous and link directly to more sophisticated texts, some of which are intended for post-secondary readers.


To reach the goal of college and career readiness for literacy involves improving rigor in actual content and materials.


The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) are transforming the way that reading is taught and assessed. The complexity of texts associated with the CCSS exceeds the level of the reading material typically used in our schools. New proficiency standards are more rigorous and link directly to more sophisticated texts, some of which are intended for post-secondary readers. To reach the goal of college and career readiness for literacy involves improving rigor in actual content and materials. The instructional implications for all teachers, not just those who specialize in English Language Arts, are enormous.


Via Mel Riddile
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Rescooped by Ashley Vickery from CCSS News Curated by Core2Class
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Students stressed by new emphasis on self-reliance

Students stressed by new emphasis on self-reliance | CCS and Instruction | Scoop.it

The new state standards, implemented this year, demand more student self-reliance. Teachers say they are encountering more surly or sullen behavior from students who feel stressed without the supplementary information they were accustomed to getting from teachers. The challenge, Muro said, is that students have become accustomed to "front-loading," meaning teachers tell them what they will be reading before they read.

 

"If we were reading about Betsy Ross, we would talk about her contribution first. Now they have to find the information on their own."

That can lead to shouts of "I don't get it," as students read material at the edge of their "frustration level." "They're not used to independence," Shannon Vicchiariello said.

 

My two cents: Not only will CCSS challenge teachers in their curriculum planning, instructional strategies and assessments, the CCSS pose challenges for teachers with regard to classroom management and building student investment.  In the end, it will be worth it! 


Via Deb Gardner
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Rescooped by Ashley Vickery from Common Core Online
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Required reading, or just misread? - An excellent piece on #commoncore and texts #ccss #ccchat #engchat

Required reading, or just misread? - An excellent piece on #commoncore and texts #ccss #ccchat #engchat | CCS and Instruction | Scoop.it
Heritage.orgjoanna weiss Required reading, or just misread?Boston GlobeYou may have heard the rumblings of panic recently over the new K-12 curriculum standards known as the Common Core.

Via Darren Burris
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Rescooped by Ashley Vickery from Common Core Online
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What Common Core ELA Instruction Might Look Like by Mike Schmoker and Carol Jago

What Common Core ELA Instruction Might Look Like by Mike Schmoker and Carol Jago | CCS and Instruction | Scoop.it

Schmoker's and Jago's take on what CCSS for ELA might look like: http://t.co/yFvdgNd9IE


Via Darren Burris
Ashley Vickery's insight:

This is a great take on CCSS and Instruction in the ELA classroom. At first glance the CCSS can seem incredibly overwhelming to a first time teacher. How can I possibly teach everything I want my students to gain while also adhereing to ALL of these standards? It's difficult, frustrating, and frightening. In this article, Schmoker and Jago say it's OK to miss some of the standards.

 

What is MOST important is that students are spending enough time on material (but not too much time) that they are able to make important connections. We need to ask our students carefully planned and executed questions that make them think. Students should be involved in rich debate, intensive writing exercises and explore other forms of texts (poems, non-fiction, speeches) that allow them to think about a novel on multiple layers.

 

Last semester, I student taught in a private school so conversations of CCSS disappeared from faculty meetings. Though the curriculum I participated in was extremely engaging and interactive, I had to think long and hard about how each lesson may apply or translate to a CCSS curriculum.

 

The beauty of NOT having the standards was that teachers are allowed to be a bit more creative. Students are not as confined to material and the stress of a common core "to do" list is eliminated. What Schmoker and Jago have explored is the perfect balance of these worlds. As teachers we can do it all, we just have to assess what is most important and engages our students the most.

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