CCES1: Exploring places in the immediate environment - Looking at Bondi Beach
36 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Shelley Coats
Scoop.it!

Bondi - then and now

Bondi - then and now | CCES1: Exploring places in the immediate environment - Looking at Bondi Beach | Scoop.it
Shelley Coats's insight:

The Sydney Morning Herald created an interactive set of photographs that contrast past and present images of Bondi Beach. Teacher’s can adapt these photographs for the classroom using information and communications technologies (ICT) such as computers and tablets so that children can engage with the photographs. ICT is believed to enhance learning as it can increase the motivation of certain children and provide new and exciting ways to engage students learning and support their understanding (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.181).

 

After exploring the site Teacher’s can initiate a collaborative classroom discussion about how the Bondi Beach Environment has changed. Teacher’s should consider the abilities and the interests of Early stage One students to ensure that their questions are effective. (Gilbert & Hoepper, 2011, p.58). Teachers may wish to ask what is different about Bondi Beach? (Consider clothing, modes of transport and vehicles). Teachers could assess students against the HSIE curriculum regarding the ability to identify changes to places in their immediate environment (NSW Board of Studies, 1998, p.49). This task can also relate to the Literacy outcome ENe-11D as the student “responds to … familiar aspects of the world and their own Experiences”, (NSW Board of Studies 2012, p. 50).

 

Further questions such as, “Are the changes good changes or bad changes?” Can develop the early stages of critical thinking. As Lucas found the ability to think critically is something that is developed over time through teacher guidance and support (Lucas, P, 2012, p.2). Therefore initiating basic critical thinking is a valuable strategy for effective pedagogy.

 

Resources:

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Lucas, P (2012) Critical reflection. What do we really mean?

Auckland University of Technology.

 

NSW Board of Studies (2012) English K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: English K-6 Syllabus (p.31). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

NSW Board of Studies (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus (pp.42-43). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shelley Coats
Scoop.it!

Aboriginal History in Bondi Beach

Shelley Coats's insight:

Bondi Beach is abundant in Aboriginal Heritage which student’s can explore as part of their studies in CCES1 NSW Board of Studies (1998). Incorporating Aboriginal Perspectives aligns the The Melbourne Declaration, where “young Australian’s will understand and acknowledge the value  of  Indigenous  cultures (Gilbert, & Hoepper 2011 p.387).

 

In 1996 the SMH published an article stating that the city of Sydney is build above a large array of Aboriginal Artifacts. This statement was illustrated by an photograph of an Aboriginal engraving that was discovered under a garage floor in the Eastern Suburbs. (Meadows,1998).

 

 

Bondi Golf Course has a large group of Aboriginal carvings that is in the local area of Bondi Beach. One of the carvings situated depicts what could be described as the first record of a shark attack at Bondi Beach (Meadows, 1998).

 

Teachers can initiate an excursion for the class to view these Aboriginal Carvings to enhance the studies of Local Aboriginal perspectives. The map attached shows the location of the site at Bondi Beach.

As detailed in Steven’s model  (2005) Teachers must individually take responsibility to ensure that they are complying with the protocols of the Aboriginal in regards to community consultation and selection criteria (Gilbert, & Hoepper, 2011, p.388). There are many resources available to assist teachers in developing skills in selecting and analysing appropriate resources. 

 

- Teacher’s should also try to achieve an authentic aboriginal perspective by arrange the participation of people from the local Aboriginal community.

 

- The attached document Aboriginal History of the Waverley Area can assist teacher’s content knowledge.  The document details important information about the heritage of the local Aboriginal group referred to as Eora (Meadows,1998). This includes the exploration of the separate and distinctive language groups that existed in the area and the various clan groups that occupied the area that is now the Waverley Council area.

 

 

References:

Meadows,E. (1999). Aboriginal History of the Waverley Area. Waverley: Reference Department, Waverley Library.

 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment (4th ed.). South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Board of Studies. (2008). Working with Aboriginal Communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols. Retrieved 24th March 2014 from http://abed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginalcommunities. pdf

 

NSW Board of Studies (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus (pp.42-43). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shelley Coats
Scoop.it!

Harmony Week- Waverley Council

Harmony Week- Waverley Council | CCES1: Exploring places in the immediate environment - Looking at Bondi Beach | Scoop.it
Shelley Coats's insight:

The local council for Bondi Beach is Waverley Council. Every year the council arrange many events to celebrate multiculturalism in the local area.

 

Early Stage 1 Teachers in the local community could plan an excursion to The Mill Hill Centre Courtyard during Harmony Week. This event includes performances, information stalls, music and song and those attending the festival were encouraged to dress in the traditional clothing of their culture.

Teachers will find an excursion such as this a great way to introduce global perspectives to ES1 students. The NSW Migration heritage centre describes Australia as being a country “where tolerance and equality are both accepted and expected by its citizens as part of a normal and decent way of life”. Attending an event such as the Harmony Week Celebrations enables children to experience such tolerance as the diversity in the local area is celebrated in a common place. This understanding meets the outcomes of CCES1 as children develop an understanding of their own heritage and the heritage of others through festivals occurring in the local area (NSW Board of Studies , 1998, pp. 42-43). In addition such a celebration promotes “a positive sense of identity… together with a positive regard for the rights and identities of others” (Commonwealth of Australia. 2008, p.9) which aligns with the five learning emphases of Global Education.

 

In addition, Teacher’s could adapt an excursion such as this to suit literary outcomes such as ENe-1A where students are required to understand “that different languages may be spoken by family, classmates and community” (NSW Board of Studies , 2012, p.31).

 

Teachers should check their local Council’s to find out what global events are occurring in their communities.

 

References:

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian Schools (p. 9). Carlton South: Education Services Australia.

 

NSW Board of Studies (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus (pp.42-43). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

NSW Board of Studies (2012) English K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: English K-6 Syllabus (p.31). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

NSW Migration heritage centre (2010) Environment and migration Impacts. Retrieved 9th April 2014 from http://www.migrationheritage.nsw.gov.au/cms/wp-content/uploads/teachers-resources/factsheets/MHC-EnvironmentImpacts.pdf

 

Waverley Council (2013) Harmony week 2013. Retrieved 9th April 2014 from http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0014/47210/Deliciously_Diverse_website.pdf

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shelley Coats
Scoop.it!

Classroom Display Tree Activity- My Place By Nadia Wheatley.

Classroom Display Tree Activity- My Place By Nadia Wheatley. | CCES1: Exploring places in the immediate environment - Looking at Bondi Beach | Scoop.it
Classroom Display - Tree - My Place in the classroom - Our Place
Shelley Coats's insight:

My Place (Wheatley, 2008) is a valuable resource for student’s exploring CCES1. The book begins in 1988 and goes back in decades to recount the stories of children who lived at in the same place at different times of Australian History.  The text both demonstrates the heritage of others and gives student’s insight into one’s own heritage (NSW Board of Studies, 1998).

The narration style is in first perspective and the language is simplistic “My name ’s Laura and this is my place” (Wheatley,2008, p.3). This makes the language accessible for school children.

For early Stage One it may be best for teachers to read section’s of My place to the class. Employing Dialogic Pedagogies such as open guiding questioning and reflection will enable teachers to extend this activity into collaborative meaning making for the class (Edwards-Groves, Anstey & Bull, 2014)

 

The Classroom Display – Tree (ABC, 2014) is a great suggested activity that teachers can do after reading sections of the book to the class. This activity is a resource that can be located on the My place For Teachers Forum. In this activity, students get to compose a simple text about their life to create a classroom display tree.

This activity would also meet curriculum requirements for Early stage one English: Responds to and composes simple texts about familiar aspects of the world and their own experiences ENe-11D (NSW Board of Studies, 2011).

 

Teachers will find this book is a rich resource for HSIE. In addition to exploring the concept of then and now (NSW Board of Studies, 1998) students can also explore dimensions such as the histories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Australian immigrants. As a teaching resource this book aligns with many In the priorities of the Australian Curriculum namely to, “ provide students with the tools and language to engage with and better understand their world at a range of levels”(ACARA. 2013).

 

The extensive array of teacher resources that have extended from Whitley’s My place demonstrates how the book fits naturally as a teaching tool for literacy across various curriculum levels. The book can be adapted to suit various levels of schooling.

 

 

References:

 

ACARA. (2013). Cross-curriculum priorities. Retrieved April 1, 2014 from http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum/cross_curriculum_priorities.html

 

ABC (2014). Retrieved 4th April from http://forum.myplace.edu.au/topic43-classroom-display--tree.aspx#post88

 

NSW Board of Studies (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus (pp.42-43). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

NSW Board of Studies (2012) English K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: English K-6 Syllabus (p.31). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

Edwards-Groves, C., Anstey, M & Bull, G. (2014)Classroom talk (pp.79-98. Newtown: PETAA

 

Wheatley,M., Rawlins, D.(2008) My Place. Newtown: Walker Books. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Shelley Coats
Scoop.it!

Bondi Pavilion history - Waverley Council

Bondi Pavilion history - Waverley Council | CCES1: Exploring places in the immediate environment - Looking at Bondi Beach | Scoop.it
Shelley Coats's insight:

Waverley Council provides the public with a concise document about the History of the Bondi Pavillion. This document declares “the Pavilion continues to hold a special place in the local landscape and is one of the most recognised features on Bondi Beach” (Waverly Council, 2014). Teachers can attain this document to teach children about the iconic Bondi Pavillion and how it has changed since its initial opening in 1911.

 

An activity that could compliment HSIE studies Early Stage 1 titled, ‘Places in the Past’ which is the publication of Thinking Globally, (Browett & Ashman, 2008, p.74). In this activity, teachers are asked to display images of the local community and allow children to distinguishing between what is old and what is new. Following this activity the class can discuss questions such as:

How has the building changed?How has the building stayed the same?Why have these changes taken place?

It is recognised that “young children can struggle with concepts of time” ((Browett & Ashman, 2010). Activities such as , ‘Places in the Past’, are a useful learning strategy for enabling children to explore the concept of time by linking it to existing knowledge about a building they are familiar with.  

This pedagogical practice identified in Places in the Past’ is also supported by the constructivist theory of teaching, which recognises that children interpret new information in terms of what they already understand (Bobis, Mulligan & Lowrie, 2013 p.8). By using a familiar place (such as the Bondi pavilion) the student can reflect upon their existing knowledge to build an understanding of the past, present and future.

Teachers from varied communities could adapt this strategy using buildings that hold significance in their local community. I would suggest checking with the Local Studies department of your local council for some historic photographs.   

 

References:

Bobis, J., Mulligan, J., & Lowrie, T. (2013). Mathematics for Children: Challenging children to think mathematically (4th ed.). Sydney: Pearson Education.

 

Browett, J., Ashman, G. (2010) Thinking Globally: Global perspectives in the Early years classroom (p.67,74) Carlton South: Education Services Australia

NSW Board of Studies (2012) English K-10 Syllabus Volume 1: English K-6

Syllabus (p.31). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

NSW Board of Studies (1998). Human Society and Its Environment K-6 Syllabus (pp.42-43). Sydney: B.O.S.

 

Waverley council, (2014). Bondi Pavilion history. Retrieved 9th April 2014 from http://www.waverley.nsw.gov.au/recreation/places_of_interest/bondi_pavilion/bondi_pavilion_history

 

 

 

more...
No comment yet.