catalysis, metal organic framework and lithium battery
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Korean scientists develop lithium-ion battery that charges 120 times faster than normal

Korean scientists develop lithium-ion battery that charges 120 times faster than normal | catalysis, metal organic framework and lithium battery | Scoop.it

A group of Korean scientists, working at the Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), have developed a fast-charge lithium-ion battery that can be recharged 30 to 120 times faster than conventional li-ion batteries. The team believes it can build a battery pack for electric vehicles that can be fully charged in less than a minute.

 

The Korean method takes the cathode material — standard lithium manganese oxide (LMO) in this case — and soaks it in a solution containing graphite. Then, by carbonizing the graphite-soaked LMO, the graphite turns into a dense network of conductive traces that run throughout the cathode. This new cathode is then packaged normally, with an electrolyte and graphite anode, to create the fast-charging li-ion battery. Other factors, such as the battery’s energy density and cycle life seem to remain unchanged.

 

These networks of carbonized graphite effectively act like blood vessels, allowing every part of the battery to recharge at the same time — thus speeding up recharge by 30 to 120 times.

 

Now, for all intents and purposes, this is a standard lithium-ion battery that could be used in smartphones and laptops — but the network of conductive traces does increase the overall size of the battery, so it’s probably better suited for use in electric vehicles (EVs). Obviously, an EV that can be recharged in under a minute is pretty crazy — though it still only brings them in-line with their gas-guzzling cousins. Being able to charge quickly is convenient, but it doesn’t get around the fact that li-ion battery packs are incredibly expensive — and the Korean carbonized LMO battery certainly won’t be cheap.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Memory effect detected in Li-ion batteries, claims research team - New Electronics

Memory effect detected in Li-ion batteries, claims research team - New Electronics | catalysis, metal organic framework and lithium battery | Scoop.it
Memory effect detected in Li-ion batteries, claims research team
New Electronics
One of the problems with NiCd and NiMH batteries was the memory effect, a chemical process which progressively reduced the battery's ability to store and deliver energy.
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New lithium-ion battery design that's 2000 times more powerful, recharges 1000 ... - ExtremeTech

New lithium-ion battery design that's 2000 times more powerful, recharges 1000 ... - ExtremeTech | catalysis, metal organic framework and lithium battery | Scoop.it
ExtremeTech
New lithium-ion battery design that's 2000 times more powerful, recharges 1000 ...
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Scientists increase lithium-sulfur battery lifetime by a factor of 10

Scientists increase lithium-sulfur battery lifetime by a factor of 10 | catalysis, metal organic framework and lithium battery | Scoop.it

The world of rechargeable batteries is full of trade-offs. While lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are currently the most commercially successful, their low energy density doesn't allow for a long driving range. They are also very expensive, often accounting for half the price of electric vehicles. One alternative is lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries, which are attractive for their high gravimetric energy density that allows them to store more energy than Li-ion batteries. And although they still use some lithium, the sulfur component allows them to be much cheaper than Li-ion batteries. But one of the biggest drawbacks of Li-S batteries is their short cycle life, which causes them to lose much of their capacity every time they are recharged.

Now a team of researchers led by Yi Cui, a professor of materials science and engineering at Stanford University, has developed a Li-S battery that can retain more than 80% of its 1180 mAh/g capacity over 300 cycles, with the potential for similar capacity retention over thousands of cycles. In contrast, most Li-S batteries lose much of their capacity after a few tens of cycles. To achieve this improvement, the researchers first identified a new mechanism that causes capacity decay in Li-S batteries after cycling. In order for a Li-S battery to successfully recharge, the lithium sulfide in the cathode must be bound to the cathode surface—in this case, the inner surface of the hollow carbon nanofiber that encapsulates it. This binding creates a good electrical contact to allow for charge flow. But the researchers found that, during the discharge process, the lithium sulfide detaches from the carbon, resulting in a loss of electrical contact that prevents the battery from fully recharging.

 

After identifying the problem, the researchers set about fixing it by adding polymers to the carbon nanofiber surface in order to modify the carbon-sulfur interface. The polymers are amphiphilic, meaning they are both hydrophilic (water-loving) and lipophilic (fat-loving), similar to soap. This property gives the polymers anchoring points that allow the lithium sulfides to bind strongly with the carbon surface in order to maintain strong electrical contacts. As experiments showed, sulfur cathodes containing the amphiphilic polymers had very stable performance, with less than 3% capacity decay over the first 100 cycles, and less than 20% decay for more than 300 cycles. Although the improvement is a big step forward, the capacity retention still doesn't compare to Li-ion batteries, some of which have lifespans approaching 10,000 cycles. In order to avoid having to replace the battery every few years, electric vehicles require these longer lifespans. But Cui says that Li-S batteries have the potential to close this gap in the foreseeable future. "Using the amphiphilic polymer idea here in this paper, together with nanoscale materials design and synthesis, it is possible to improve the cycle life up to 10,000 cycles," Cui told Phys.org. "My group is working on this. Our recent results on nanomaterials design already improved to 1000 cycles." In the future, Cui think Li-S batteries will give Li-ion batteries some serious competition. "The Li-S batteries become pretty promising for electric vehicles," he said. "The life cycle needs to improve further. The lithium metal anodes' safety problem needs to be solved. It is possible to get around Li metal anodes with Si anodes."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dan Aldridge's curator insight, March 5, 2013 9:56 AM

Very encouraging news about improved lithium-sulfur batteries. Maybe Boeing should investigate for the Dreamliner!

Mercor's curator insight, March 5, 2013 10:31 AM

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Silicon-nanotube anodes enhance Li-ion batteries - Eetasia.com (subscription)

Silicon-nanotube anodes enhance Li-ion batteries - Eetasia.com (subscription) | catalysis, metal organic framework and lithium battery | Scoop.it
Eetasia.com (subscription) Silicon-nanotube anodes enhance Li-ion batteries Eetasia.com (subscription) Battery start-up Amprius described how its lithium ion technology, which taps the topology of silicon nanowire anodes rather than carbon-based...
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Sulfur Based Batteries/Plastic - Environmental News Network

Sulfur Based Batteries/Plastic - Environmental News Network | catalysis, metal organic framework and lithium battery | Scoop.it
The Green Optimistic (blog)
Sulfur Based Batteries/Plastic
Environmental News Network
The lithium—sulfur battery is a rechargeable battery, notable for its high energy density.
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