Cassaundra's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Literary Criticism

Literary Criticism | Cassaundra's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Cassaundra Trudel's insight:

This literary criticism recognizes the play "A Midsummer Night's Dream". It analyzes the characters Bottom and Puck. It compares them and their roles thorughout the play. It describes the play as being "Shakespeare's most fragile of visionary dramas". To the author, Bottom is amiable, as Puck is more charming. The author also insists that the play is solely based on the characters, Puck and Bottom. Bottom is described as " function in the play; he is its core, and also he is the most original figure in A Midsummer Night's Dream". Puck is described as "being the spirit of mischief, is both a hobgoblin and "sweet Puck,"". It is also suggested that if Puck were in charge, instead of Oberon, then Bottom would have remained a donkey the rest of the play. As well as "the four young lovers would [have] [continued] their misadventures forever". This was a very informing article that gives you a different perspective of the play.

 

"Infobase Learning - Login." Infobase Learning - Login. N.p., n.d. Web. 02 Mar. 2013.

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Source

Source | Cassaundra's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Cassaundra Trudel's insight:

This is an extremely interesting article. It suggests that Shakespeare may have been a penn name for "An Elizabthan courtier and author, the Earl of Oxford". This is a very plausible theory because "De Vere's family crest was a lion shaking a spear, and around his court he was known as the 'spear shaker'". He could have used this name to protect his family from losing their power. The Earl of Oxford also was well educated. He recieved two master degrees and studied law for three years throughout the duration of his life.  Lastly, Shakespeare never left England, however, most of his stories take place in Italy. The Earl of Oxford "travelled throughout Europe and extensively in Italy and had knowledge of court life and politics". All of these facts and suggestions, lead many literary critics and historians to believe that Shakespeare was not real and it was just De Vere.

 

N.p., n.d. Web. 26 Feb. 2013. 52-54.

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Video

Cassaundra Trudel's insight:

This video is a ballet of "A Midsummer Night's Dream". It is a really neat way to view this play. The way the characters dance helps show what goes on and the emotions portrayed throughout.  The ballet is just under two hours long like the original movies are. I feel as though watching this will give people a good understanding of the play even though there are no words. It is an interesting way to view the play. It will give you a different perspective of the play and maybe give it more meaning to you. If you ever have any extra time, I really reccommend watching the whole ballet or even go to see one yourself. 

 

 

"A_MIDSUMMER_NIGHTS_DREAM. FELIX MENDELSSOHN BARTHOLDY Ballet Complete." YouTube. YouTube, 21 Jan. 2012. Web. 10 Feb. 2013.

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Marissa Marsella's comment, March 5, 2013 11:43 PM
This video was such an original idea! I love how the play was portrayed through actions rather than the somewhat confusing sequence of poetry.
Cassaundra Trudel's comment, March 7, 2013 12:48 PM
Thank you! I really enjoyed it, too. I think it was a neat idea because there were no words and Shakespeare is known for such creative, detailed language.
sarah levesque's comment, March 7, 2013 8:17 PM
I agree Marissa! Cassaundra, it was really creative how you wer able to take ballet and Shakespeare and find a video that you could easily follow with the plays plot!
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Image

Image | Cassaundra's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Cassaundra Trudel's insight:

This image was taken at a performance of "A Midsummer Night's Dream" in a Boca Raton high school. In the picture you can see the majority of the cast. This image shows the need for close to no props. The cast is dressed in costumes, other than that they barely have props. This portrays Shakespeare's extensive use of descriptive language. His plays are so descriptive that there was no use for items to be used in the play. Back in Elizabethan England, the actors did not have the budget for props, so this was the perfect style of writing for them.This portrays the timelessness and classical language of Shakespeare.

 

 

 

 

"Boca High to Open 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' Thursday." Boca High to Open 'A Midsummer Night's Dream' Thursday. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2013.

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Historical Article

Historical Article | Cassaundra's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
Cassaundra Trudel's insight:

This article is a real "eye opener". It tells you the life of William Shakespeare in chronological order. Based on this article, I believe that he wrote his plays based on what was going on in England during that time period. "Early in his career, Shakespeare wrote a group of four plays looking at the reign of Lancastrian King Henry VI and the transfer of power to the Yorkist monarchs culminating with the treacherous King Richard III and his defeat by Henry Tudor". These plays were Richard II, Henry IV, Part I and Part II. When Shakespeare's father died in 1601, he wrote" The tragedy of Hamlet at around that time". During his lifetime, Shakespeare encountered a series of wars and based on those wars he wrote a "Tetralogy providing the earlier history with vivid accounts of these Wars". Based upon all of  these examples of his plays, Shakespeare wrote most of his plays using many major events in his lifetime.

 

Gaines, Barry. "Biography Of William Shakespeare." Critical Insights: King Lear (2011): 18-24. Literary Reference Center. Web. 6 Feb. 2013.

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