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Preparing for Cyber War, Without a Map - Technology Review

Preparing for Cyber War, Without a Map - Technology Review | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
The U.S. government has pledged to retaliate quickly if power grids or other critical elements of infrastructure are hacked—but the technology needed to do so is lacking.
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CAS 383: Culture and Technology
Class Resources for Penn State Berks CAS 383 Course.
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Facebook wants you to run a quick privacy checkup on your profile

Facebook wants you to run a quick privacy checkup on your profile | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Facebook on Thursday announced that it will expand its "Privacy Checkup" feature.
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corina piller's comment, Today, 7:19 PM
The article I chose, "Site Asks Social Networkers to Rethink Revelations" discusses the costs of posting your whereabouts online. This article expands further on the question this week of what are the costs and benefits of posting your whereabouts online? This article clearly states there are more costs. Arising from people using; Facebook check ins, Foursquare, Twitter, Loopt, and Gowalla to post their whereabouts inspired someone to create a website called Please Rob Me. This site "assembles its list by taking info that Twitter makes freely available along with data that flows from dozens of other sites." The article says we do not give a second thought to posting our whereabouts anymore and using the location-based services because "the power of wanting to share where you are and what you are experiencing trumps most people's wariness." The creator of please rob me said "technology has become so easy to use that people are sharing too much online without even realizing it" and his Web page shows a "scruffy-looking, loot-lugging burglar. Below that, it indicates that the site is listing all those empty homes out there." Foursquares co-founder is quoted in the article stating he has not heard complaints from people about this and that Foursqaure does not have bad consequences. Along with the FBI stating he was not aware of any break-ins linked to people advertising their locations online. The main point is letting people know where you are and where you are not leaves you vulnerable with all the oversharing that you are doing willingly or without your knowledge (through friends tagging or your phone location being on) METZ, RACHEL. "Site Asks Social Networkers To Rethink Revelations." Community College Week (2010): 21. Academic Search Complete. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.
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Data Dealer: Online Privacy Game

The gleefully sarcastic online game about collecting and selling personal data. Also available on Facebook!

Via Higher Ed InfoSec Council
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Watch now: The Open Mind | The Web Means the End of Forgetting, Part II | PBS Video

Richard Heffner speaks with Jeffrey Rosen on the implications of web technology.
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Google CEO Suggests You Change Your Name to Escape His Permanent Recor Google CEO Eric Schmidt

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Nyalima Esther Gaojia's comment, September 30, 12:58 PM
Litt, Eden, and Eszter Hargittai. Smile, snap, and share? A nuanced approach to privacy and online photo-sharing. . N.p.: n.p., 2013. Print.
Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, September 30, 1:03 PM
Citation : Congress Daily. Parents worry about TMI online. N.p.: Congress Daily, 10/8/2010. 1. Web. 30 Sept. 2014. <http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=238273dc-c958-4522-b66e-a8e78df034b0%40sessionmgr110&hid=118&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=a9h&AN=54489368>;
Erik Lewis's comment, September 30, 1:13 PM
Looking for issues of privacy on academic search complete brought up an interesting and recent article about how the European Union recently passed a law that states that individuals have the right to have harmful data about themselves removed from internet searches. This article is specifically about how Google is dealing with the law while struggling to maintain relevance. I can understand the argument, because while people do have a right to have harmful data removed, without limiting the definition of harmful data, there's nothing to stop the removal of all data by all parties, severely limiting the usefulness of search engines like Google. The article covers Google's current policy for removal of search results, as well a recent court case where a Spanish man requested that a 15 year old announcement be removed from Google because it was damaging to his reputation. The man won his initial court case, but upon appeal, Google was found to be justified in including the record. This applies to our class discussion because we have been talking about how the internet never forgets, a fact that is corroborated by experts like Larry Lessig, who says that data has become more expensive to delete than to keep, but if Google's standards for removal are lessened, this could introduce an element of "forgetfulness" into the internet, which could be helpful to the internet generation.

Weiss, Todd R. "Google Working Out Specifics Of EU's 'Right To Forget' Law." Eweek (2014): 5. Academic Search Complete. Web. 30 Sept. 2014.
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Psychiatrist's view: Yik Yak is most dangerous app I've ever seen

Psychiatrist's view: Yik Yak is most dangerous app I've ever seen | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Here’s something important our society seems to be afraid to say out loud: Despite its name, “social media” is an inherently antisocial medium.
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Sasha Henry's comment, September 18, 11:51 AM
Given that social media users have the ability to control their individual privacy to some extent, is it wrong for third parties such as corporations or government to utilize this information for profiling?
Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure and Social. Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
Retrieved from https://www.privacyrights.org/social-networking-privacy-how-be-safe-secure-and-social
Megan Christel's comment, September 18, 1:47 PM
In the article I read, it explains that on Facebook, people are typically only more likely to adjust their privacy settings if they've had issues, otherwise, most people do not even bother to look into the privacy settings. Even for those that may have restrictions on their profile pages, they may not take into account the number of friends they have, which can be just as "dangerous" or detrimental to one's privacy. Overall, people underestimate social media sites like Facebook, and all of the effects they may have on our individual privacy. Debatin, Bernhard, Jennette P. Lovejoy, Ann-Kathrin Horn, and Brittany N. Hughes. "Facebook and Online Privacy: Attitudes, Behaviors, and Unintended Consequences." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 15.1 (2009): 83-108. Web. 18 Sept. 2014.
Kayla Hayick's comment, September 22, 4:25 PM
I dont think people really know how much privacy they dont have online. I do believe that yik yak is a dangerous website and the privacy they offer is only hurting people, not helping them. The article explains why there is fault in privacy on the internet. I also don't think people necessarily care about privacy on the internet unless something personal happens to them. http://web.a.ebscohost.com.ezaccess.libraries.psu.edu/ehost/detail/detail?vid=13&sid=c8587302-0308-42f0-937f-2de29dcdad49%40sessionmgr4003&hid=4107&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=a9h&AN=91719882
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The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology

The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester


Abstract

This paper reports on an observation of 70 university students’ use of their personal social network site (SNS), Facebook, over a 22-week university study period. The study sought to determine the extent that university students use their personal SNSs to support learning by exploring frequencies of academic-related content and topics being discussed. The findings reported in the paper reveal that students used their personal SNSs to discuss academic-related topics, particularly to share experiences about doing work or procrastinating, course content and grades. Mapping academic-related activity frequencies over the 22 weeks illustrated that around certain points in the academic calendar, particularly times when students’ assignments or exams were nearing, academic activity increased, suggesting that SNSs may play an important role in a students’ academic experience.

The findings suggest that many students today may be leaving traces of their academic journey online and that academics should be aware that these interactions may also exist in their own students’ online social spaces. This study offers opportunities for future research, particularly research which seeks to determine differences between individuals’ academic activity, the extent that intensive SNSs use supports or distracts students from learning, as well as the extent to which universities should or can harness SNSs to improve the student experience.

Keywords: informal learning; social networking; Facebook; university students; social network sites


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Claire Brooks's curator insight, September 7, 3:33 AM

remember to connect to Naomi Barnes

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 8, 8:25 AM

The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology

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What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains - YouTube

Most of us are on the Internet on a daily basis and whether we like it or not, the Internet is affecting us. It changes how we think, how we work, and it eve...
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The Amazing Ways The Google Car Will Change the World | Visual.ly

The Amazing Ways The Google Car Will Change the World | Visual.ly | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
We've all heard about Google's plans to launch a self-driving car, but perhaps few of us have really gotten to grips with the full implications. Self-
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Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet

Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
What will the internet look like in the near future, 20 years, 100 years? We explore the possibilities in this illustration.

Via Lauren Moss
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Jim Doyle's curator insight, August 17, 6:37 AM

The Future of the Internet

Idris Grant's curator insight, August 25, 3:31 PM

With all the talk of "The Internet of Things," and the rapid advances we're seeing with all-things web, smart devices and hyper-connected world, we found this Infographic goes a long way to tell the story.

Edgar Mata's curator insight, September 1, 10:10 PM

¿Cómo será la internet dentro de 20 años?

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Studying the Digital Self

Studying the Digital Self | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Five analytical concepts can guide scholarship on virtual lives.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 25, 12:08 AM

This looks very interesting for anyone involved in research and academic work.

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» The Collapse of Complex Business Models Clay Shirky

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An Inside Look At News Curation Apps from the RJI Futures Lab


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Robin Good's curator insight, March 30, 1:37 PM



This short but quite interesting video update looks at emerging news curation apps designed to gather and select the most relevant news for their users. 

Circa's David Cohn, Inside's Jason Calacanis and Newsy's Jim Spencer provide key insight into what their news discovery services are offering and how they use curation to achieve this result.  


The video covers also the value of curation over original journalism and issues of copyright and fair use.


Interesting. Informative. 7/10


Original video: http://youtu.be/Gf3SYrt2Jgw 



Bob Boynton's comment, March 31, 12:51 AM
I cannot use my scoop.it because I am following you and I do not have adobe flash installed, and I do not want adobe flash installed. But the video will not let me access my scoop.it.
socialcompany's curator insight, May 23, 9:04 AM

stories behind circa, inside, newsy, good short videos.

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The Technologists' Siren Song

The Technologists' Siren Song | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Hucksters for innovation play down its political, economic, and environmental costs.
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A Game that Plays with Private Information - The New Yorker

A Game that Plays with Private Information - The New Yorker | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
As the public debated the merits of the National Security Agency’s mass surveillance programs and its close ties with the technology companies that hold so much of the world’s personal data, an Austrian developer named Wolfie Christl arrived in New York City to receive an award for a video game he created, in which the player’s objective is to collect and sell as much private information as possible. The free online game is called Data Dealer. Using hackers, detectives, and Internet business schemes, you amass a cache of fictional private information, and then sell that data to corporations (like Star Mart), health-insurance companies, and the faintly disguised Central Security Agency. Christl and his small team originally released the game to German-speaking countries in April, 2012, and recently expanded it internationally with an English version. “At the moment, there is all this Prism and N.S.A. scandal, and for sure, information about people is often given by private companies to governmental agencies,” Christl told me. “In our game, you are selling the information to the government. In real life, you just give it away for free.” He erupted with a hearty laugh.
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Megan Christel's comment, September 30, 6:58 PM
In the article, "Facebook Privacy Settings: Who Cares?" (2010), the authors, Danah Boyd and Eszter Hargittai in a sense play "devil's advocate" to everything that we have discussed in class. We place so much emphasis on privacy online, but in all reality, who cares? The lack of privacy, for the vast majority of us, does not prevent us from using social media or online shopping. The authors found that despite all of the complaints and criticism against Facebook, their ability to attract users is still increasing. As a student of this course, it is definitely useful to become more aware of some of the ramifications of the lack of privacy online, but I know that for most of us, it won't stop us from using the Internet. Regardless of whether you care about the privacy settings on your social media sites, I still think it's important to know the costs and the benefits of the Internet. Boyd, Danah, and Eszter Hargittai. "Facebook Privacy Settings: Who Cares?" First Monday 15.8 (2010). Web. 30 Sept. 2014.
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How to Clean Up Your Online Reputation

How to Clean Up Your Online Reputation | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Taking control of how you appear in search results and on social networking sites may seem daunting, but it doesn't have to be difficult.
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Watch now: The Open Mind | The Web Means the End of Forgetting, Part I | PBS Video

Journalist Jeffrey Rosen discusses the implications of internet technologies.
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Google: Brace Yourselves for the Data Explosion

Google: Brace Yourselves for the Data Explosion | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Google CEO Eric Schmidt says a data tsunami is coming -- and we're totally unprepared to handle the deluge. He's right.
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Emily Kooistra's comment, September 23, 1:22 PM
The article that I read spoke about how technology impacts our younger generations' education and compares it from this century and earlier ones. What struck me was that although the author makes very valid points, they are still not aware of exactly how this will impact our youngsters' education and how effective technology is in the classroom . Mostly because of how rapidly technology is evolving.

McPheeters, Dallas. "Cyborg Learning Theory: Technology In Education And The Blurring Of Boundaries." World Future Review (World Future Society) 1.6 (2009): 34-39. Academic Search Complete. Web. 23 Sept. 2014.
Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, September 23, 1:22 PM
Aslong as you own a social network, or some system of that source you have some little piece of information regarding yourself out there. The question is are we ready or do we even know whats out there about us. You might be thinking, "oh I dont own social network page, so I'm good". Well sorry to burst your bubble, blogging could be considered one, or even some jobs have a profile of their employees out online. In my view there is probably nothing like privacy anymore, a lot of our personal information and life is out there on the internet for the world to see. Be it through facebooks, supposed privacy settings or even through their new facebook messenger app, which actually takes hold of a lot of information on your phone without your knowledge. http://web.a.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=ab5ccc77-9e74-4951-b6f4-33fc2abe4ad3%40sessionmgr4003&hid=4114&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=a9h&AN=96920246
Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, September 23, 1:25 PM
work cited. Jacquelyn, Burkell. Facebook. Vol. 17. N.p.: Taylor and francis, 2014. Print.
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On overload

On overload | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
WE LIVE in an age of distraction. Teenagers tap text messages during dinner; students idly surf the Web instead of taking notes in class; office workers add to their Amazon wish lists. It's not just...
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Hali Aileen Barron's comment, September 17, 3:03 PM
In the article I read, Wi-Fi is the New Cigarette written by Rishona Campbell it states that over 61% of Americans have access to Wi-Fi in their homes. We this statement you can assume that the families using this Wi-Fi are for a newer advancement of technology such as cellphones, Ps4, Xbox, Smart TVs, laptops, tablets, etc. So, with over 61% of Americans having this access in their house unleashes a question: Who exactly has access through this Wi-Fi? Because of the advances in technology over the last couple decades we have found out not only have we became lazy because of such technologies, but we have also become ignorant. Any hacker can fully mirror an individual’s computer with access to their IP Address which is produced over the Wi-Fi. This is showing we have become ignorant of our privacy. We have abused this privilege that was given to us and now we cannot take it back.
Campbell, Rishona. Wi-Fi is the New Cigarette. Vol. 0 . N.p.: DashBurst, 2014. N. pag. Web. 25 Mar. 2014. <http://blog.dashburst.com/infographic/wi-fi-new-cigarette/>.
Payden Rybicki's comment, September 18, 10:50 AM
The article I read was about how schools are expanding their technology to the students. Although in California they just passed a law that restricts some of the technology used from kindergarten through high school. People are saying it is a landmark law that could change how people look at technology in schools. In the law they prohibited educational sites, apps and cloud services because they disclose personal information for the students which they don't want at all. This law will become very important to society in the future because technology only grows it never tracts backwards.
http://sk8es4mc2l.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&issn=03624331&title=New%20York%20Times&volume=163&issue=56625&date=20140915&atitle=With%20Tech%20Taking%20Over%20In%20Schools%2C%20Worries%20Rise.&spage=B1&pages=&sid=EBSCO:Academic%20Search%20Complete&aulast=SINGER,%20NATASHA

Singer, Natasha. "With Tech Taking Over in Schools, Worries Rise." The New York Times 15 Sept. 2014: 1. Print
Payden Rybicki's comment, September 18, 10:50 AM
The article I read was about how schools are expanding their technology to the students. Although in California they just passed a law that restricts some of the technology used from kindergarten through high school. People are saying it is a landmark law that could change how people look at technology in schools. In the law they prohibited educational sites, apps and cloud services because they disclose personal information for the students which they don't want at all. This law will become very important to society in the future because technology only grows it never tracts backwards.
http://sk8es4mc2l.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&issn=03624331&title=New%20York%20Times&volume=163&issue=56625&date=20140915&atitle=With%20Tech%20Taking%20Over%20In%20Schools%2C%20Worries%20Rise.&spage=B1&pages=&sid=EBSCO:Academic%20Search%20Complete&aulast=SINGER,%20NATASHA

Singer, Natasha. "With Tech Taking Over in Schools, Worries Rise." The New York Times 15 Sept. 2014: 1. Print
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Scholars Turn Their Attention to Attention

Scholars Turn Their Attention to Attention | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
New insights into the nature of learning, memory, and intelligence may prove valuable in the classroom, David Glenn reports.
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Emily Kooistra's comment, September 9, 11:12 AM
The article I read spoke about how a pharmaceutical school in Buffalo is handling the constant multitasking of their students. The school's professors have noticed a drastic decrease in the amount of reading that students will do and how that can negatively impact their critical thinking skills. Most classrooms do not allow students to bring laptops in order to make sure they give the professor their undivided attention. They were also looking at ways to block cell signal in classrooms so students could use their phones either. In a way I think this is naive. Technology and multitasking are things that are not going to disappear and are going to be a very big part of their students' futures. Instead of completely blocking out these new devices, I think the school should be looking for innovative ways to incorporate those types of devices in their classroom and get students to exercise focus. Brazeau, Gayle A., and Daniel A. Brazeau. "The Challenge Of Educating In A Highly-Connected And Multitasking World." American Journal Of Pharmaceutical Education 75.7 (2011): 1-2. Academic Search Complete. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.

http://web.b.ebscohost.com.ezaccess.libraries.psu.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=d4692f05-3192-4fe6-a065-e00e74bc9672%40sessionmgr113&vid=10&hid=120
Elisa Guatieri's comment, September 9, 1:35 PM
The article I read was about a study that was published by a psychologist at the University of Utah, who found that it is more distracting for drivers to be talking on their cell phone than having a conversation with passengers. During the research, 41 drivers were paired with friends. In the first experiment the driver used a hands free cell phone to talk to the passenger who was not in the car. In the second experiment they both driver and passenger were in the car. In the third experiment, they were both in the car but did not have a conversation. The conclusion was that drivers having a conversation on a cell phone was 4 times more likely to miss pulling off at a rest area(as previously instructed in the experiment) as those talking to passengers in person. They were also more likely to drift in lanes and keep more distance between their car and the one in front of them.
Elisa Guatieri's comment, September 9, 1:35 PM
"Cell phone use more distracting to drivers than with chatting with passengers." Harvard Mental Health Letter Feb. 2009: 7+. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.
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Is Google Making Us Stupid?

Is Google Making Us Stupid? | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
What the Internet is doing to our brains
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Elisa Guatieri's comment, September 4, 6:11 PM
Rosen, Larry D., Mark L. Carrier, and Nancy A. Cheever. N.p., May 2013. EBSCOhost. Web. 4 Sept. 2014.
Sasha Henry's comment, September 9, 7:59 AM
The article read was “Is Google Making us Stupid,” by Nicholas Carr. He postulates that the advent of the internet, and the continued use of search engines capable of finding information we need in a matter of seconds, has changed the way humans process information. According to Carr, we are no longer able to patiently look for information, and instead expect information to be presented the way the internet does it, failure to which we grow impatient with the source. Our brains have become rewired to skim through information, rather than engage in deep reading. This is in line with Dudley’s assertion that the internet and the coming of third generation technologies, has changed how humans process information, and made the human mind much slower and lacking in essential analytical skills.
Carr, Nicholas. “Is Google Making Us Stupid.” The Atlantic, 1 July 2008. <http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/>;
Emily Rumpf's comment, September 9, 9:36 AM
This article emphasizes the connection between a adolescent's shyness and their problematic internet use. As one of the disadvantages of the internet, mentioned in class, adolescents can be victims of cyberbullying or solicitations. This study shows that if a child tends to be more shy there is a direct correlation and increase in their problematic internet use, than one who is more social with their peers. This directly relates to some of the issues addressed in the Frontline video. Huan, Vivien S., et al. "The Impact Of Shyness On Problematic Internet Use: The Role Of Loneliness." Journal Of Psychology 148.6 (2014): 699-715. Academic Search Complete. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.
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The Insidiousness of Facebook Messenger's Mobile App Terms of Service

The Insidiousness of Facebook Messenger's Mobile App Terms of Service | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
How much access to your (and your friends') personal data are you prepared to share for access to free mobile apps? I suspect the amount is significantly less than that which you actually agreed to share when blindly accepting the Terms of Service.
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The impact of technology cartoon

The impact of technology cartoon | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
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The Ideal Length for All Online Content

The Ideal Length for All Online Content | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Learn the ideal length of Facebook posts, tweets, blog posts, Google+ headlines, title tags, paragraphs, and so much more.
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Best Tech Stories from Around the Web (March 31-April 4) | MIT Technology Review

Best Tech Stories from Around the Web (March 31-April 4) | MIT Technology Review | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.
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How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information?

How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information? | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Beyond increasing the amount of information that students can access, the new abundant economy of information has far greater implications. It represents both a shift in the way that future classrooms will operate as well as in the student behaviors that we will value and expect.
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