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Andrew Blum: What is the Internet, really? | Video on TED.com

TED Talks When a squirrel chewed through a cable and knocked him offline, journalist Andrew Blum started wondering what the Internet was really made of.
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CAS 383: Culture and Technology
Class Resources for Penn State Berks CAS 383 Course.
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CAS 383 PSA FINAL PROJECT SCRIPTS

Post your PSA Script HERE

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Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, December 18, 11:12 PM
images for animoto https://www.google.com/search?q=cyber+footprints+on+facebook&biw=1164&bih=571&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=5Y-TVMuIDrjLsASllILYAw&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=7Q_GcAEyBDgvdM%253A%3BbO4FXBmVftsP_M%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fjoannalouiseranson.files.wordpress.com%252F2012%252F04%252Fdigital-footprint.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fjoannalouiseranson.wordpress.com%252F2012%252F04%252F09%252Fdigital-footprint-internet-trolls-and-cyber-bullying%252F%3B498%3B360

https://www.google.com/search?q=facebook+has+access+to+your+information&biw=1164&bih=535&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=m5eTVPG6DKjHsQTy4IHADg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=KOvuRV5Rz9ZWKM%253A%3BF_pPWucYJpOYKM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fcdn1.tnwcdn.com%252Ffiles%252F2011%252F01%252Fcurrent_address_mobile_phone1.png%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fthenextweb.com%252Ffacebook%252F2011%252F01%252F16%252Ffacebook-apps-can-now-obtain-your-phone-number-and-home-address%252F%3B550%3B306

https://www.google.com/search?q=facebook+has+access+to+your+information&biw=1164&bih=535&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=m5eTVPG6DKjHsQTy4IHADg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg#facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=oayhM3BrbPwdCM%253A%3BmaCNEOgTzoYzJM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fcdn.makeuseof.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252F2012%252F04%252FFacebook-Enter-New-Email-Address.png%253F3cb89b%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.makeuseof.com%252Ftag%252Frecover-facebook-account-longer-log%252F%3B563%3B230

https://www.google.com/search?q=facebook+has+access+to+your+information&biw=1164&bih=535&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=m5eTVPG6DKjHsQTy4IHADg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg#tbm=isch&q=facebook+messenger+hacks+your+phone&facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=Uz-4Mam2kUfS_M%253A%3BhkdTp18N8al6RM%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fyazmar.com%252Fwp-content%252Fuploads%252Foioii.jpg%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.yazmar.com%252F2014%252F07%252F31%252Ffacebook-messenger-hacks-into-your-phone%252F%3B640%3B360

https://www.google.com/search?q=facebook+has+access+to+your+information&biw=1164&bih=535&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=m5eTVPG6DKjHsQTy4IHADg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg#tbm=isch&q=dont+post+personal+information+on+facebook&facrc=_&imgdii=_&imgrc=FufiYn2vTebFzM%253A%3BPBpWnMIubGzFxM%3Bhttps%253A%252F%252Ffishofgold.files.wordpress.com%252F2014%252F06%252Ffacebook-not-your-diary.jpg%253Fw%253D800%3Bhttp%253A%252F%252Ffishofgold.net%252F2014%252F06%252F27%252Fdont-like-social-media%252F%3B420%3B294
Rachel P's comment, December 18, 11:18 PM
In the article titled “Privacy Settings and Safety Tips for Using Flickr” the author discusses ways to use the settings to ensure that you get the privacy that you want. In this next article “Privacy is Dead on Flickr” the author points out that photos that are posted are automatically public. He brings up that there is no point in posting photos if not for others to see it. In the final article “Flickr Launches Image Marketplace Initiative” the author describes a new but dangerous addition to the Flickr sharing space: a marketplace that buys your images and sells them. With this, you lose not only your ownership but also your privacy since the terms and conditions state that you must give your name, age, gender, and address along with each photo. This sounds odd, but this is a part of the here and now future that we live in. Privacy is dead.

Cashmore, Pete. "Privacy Is Dead for Flickr." CNN. Cable News Network, 28 Oct. 2009. Web. 10 Dec. 2014. <http://www.cnn.com/2009/OPINION/10/28/cashmore.online.privacy/index.html?iref=24hours>.
"Privacy Settings and Safety Tips for Using Flickr." Report a Cyberstalker Support for Victims of a Cyberstalker. N.p., 24 Sept. 2012. Web. 10 Dec. 2014. <http://www.fightcyberstalking.org/privacy-settings-flickr/>.
Rehm, Lars. "Flickr Launches Image Marketplace Initiative." Connect. Connect, 29 July 2014. Web. 10 Dec. 2014. <http://connect.dpreview.com/post/2892483123/flickr-launches-image-marketplace-initiative>.
https://www.flickr.com/guidelines.gne
Animoto references:
http://www.fightcyberstalking.org/privacy-settings-flickr/
http://connect.dpreview.com/post/2892483123/flickr-launches-image-marketplace-initiative
http://www.trecebits.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/flickr-insp1-619x346.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/make_a_wish_xoxo/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/elizabethgadd/15907511716/
Emily Kooistra's comment, December 18, 11:41 PM
Flickr provides their users with tips to protect their intellectual property but, it leaves many holes for theft to come through. Additionally, according to Yahoo’s privacy information, they share/sell your account information to other third party companies. In the end, your photos are still susceptible to those with access to the website and Flickr is not responsible for protecting those photos and your Flickr/Yahoo account information WILL be shared if you make an account.

Animoto/Script
Associated Press. “Virgin Mobile Sued over Flickr Image Used in Ad.” World Business on NBC News. N.p., 20 Sept. 2007. Web. 19 Dec. 2014.
Klaassen, Abbey. “User-Created Ads Create Rights Conundrum: EBSCOhost.” Advertising Age 80.38 (2009): 3–32. Print.
Villasenor, John. “Copyright Infringement And Photo Sharing: A New Lawsuit Tests The Limits Of Fair Use.” N.p., 22 June 2013. Web. 19 Dec. 2014.

Images:
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fpixgood.com%2Fflickr-logo-black-png.html&ei=_KaTVLSUFJHGsQSu4YH4CQ&bvm=bv.82001339,d.cWc&psig=AFQjCNE3-GS3bAbaaVhxkf9OqpYnZSjmjA&ust=1419049101882684
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Ftechau.com.au%2Fwindows-8-will-implement-family-safety-for-worrying-parents%2F&ei=M6eTVN8R8ZmxBMebgrgG&bvm=bv.82001339,d.cWc&psig=AFQjCNHjicG5R_0j6DIhDpDx_FPPDVlp0w&ust=1419049136711868
https://www.google.com/search?sa=G&tbm=isch&tbs=simg:CAQSaRpnCxCo1NgEGgYIAwgJCAoMCxCwjKcIGjwKOggCEhSKDIUM_1BTsCLgWlhXwC7wWgAiTFRogdku_1mfA0VRYTKZ1JKY-S9gEybksPryPkrds9XFabBcAMCxCOrv4IGgoKCAgBEgRFnjL1DA&ei=qqeTVM_DF6TesASqmIK4BA&ved=0CBsQwg4oAA
https://www.google.com/search?sa=G&q=digital+citizenship&tbm=isch&tbs=simg:CAQSZRpjCxCo1NgEGgIIBAwLELCMpwgaPAo6CAISFLYKtArjE70KyBPBE-0SliDDH5kgGiD0A0c3Av5M9vLhvOCFp1YEQlhQyP9a9-svEgVrIaideAwLEI6u_1ggaCgoICAESBOsDGAUM&ei=yaeTVK7IEqz7sATTkYDICA&ved=0CBsQwg4oAA
https://lh4.ggpht.com/CKkXnpU5nNxHnS53h43VoDciuTLApiQ2XLW_Zd_dBEX2WCvpLrb-dKqGK6FGduA_Jkvj=s136
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Ftownsville2070.com%2Fcreative-commons%2F&ei=A6iTVODVJceKsQSx7oGQBQ&bvm=bv.82001339,d.cWc&psig=AFQjCNEcggP7aJLnGeHT_lErNpxjQCILzQ&ust=1419049344042824
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.mcneelyfs.com%2Ffine-print&ei=H6qTVOuTL-61sASR7oDIDg&bvm=bv.82001339,d.cWc&psig=AFQjCNH-f-HNd10PKsQWu-XVHp1Hkx5abA&ust=1419049878520390
https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CAcQjRw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.police.belleville.on.ca%2Fbeawarec204.php&ei=d6qTVOvYBsLmsASUiIHgDw&bvm=bv.82001339,d.cWc&psig=AFQjCNGbROgTDmIlGiILHj8dTzgwd0ByjQ&ust=1419049970290343
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Where’s Google going next?

Where’s Google going next? | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Onstage at TED2014, Charlie Rose interviews Google CEO Larry Page about his far-off vision for the company. It includes aerial bikeways and internet balloons … and then it gets even more interesting, as Page talks through the company’s recent acquisition of Deep Mind, an AI that is learning some surprising things.
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Report: Internet of Things To Hit 25 Billion Units, $264 Billion by 2020 -- THE Journal

Report: Internet of Things To Hit 25 Billion Units, $264 Billion by 2020 -- THE Journal | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
The number of things connected to the Internet and in use will grow 30 percent from this year to next, for a total of 4.9 billion, according to a new report from market research firm Gartner, and will hit 25 billion by 2020.
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ROBOT WINS ROCK, PAPER SCISSORS EVERY-TIME - BBC NEWS - YouTube

A robot developed by Japanese scientists is so fast it can win the rock-paper-scissors game against a human every single time. The Janken robot recognises ha...
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corina piller's comment, November 11, 10:47 PM
copyright has been apart of our history since the nineteenth-century that intertwined the idea of an evolving Western civilization. Law is something that constitutes culture and it cannot be divorced from law. Cultural scholars are focusing on copyright as a field of research expanding into the discipline of law. The article stated copyright is the hallmark of civilization and reflected the role of print culture. The birth of copyright was influenced by romanticism and enlightenment philosophy in the late eighteenth and nineteeth centuries. Contemporary debates about copyright and piracy rely on inherited values and structures of power. Fredriksson, Martin. "Copyright Culture And Pirate Politics." Cultural Studies 28.5/6 (2014): 1022-1047. Academic Search Complete. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
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Harvard Researchers Used Secret Cameras to Study Attendance. Was That Unethical?

Harvard Researchers Used Secret Cameras to Study Attendance. Was That Unethical? | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
The high-tech effort struck some people as creepy, others as a violation of faculty autonomy. But the data collected was a far cry from what online programs already gather.
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Make Your Own Video Mashups for YouTube

Make Your Own Video Mashups for YouTube | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Put the 'you' in YouTube with this hands-on guide to shooting, editing, and uploading your own movies and mashups.
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Rachel P's comment, November 11, 11:28 AM
From our past and toward our future, copyright has always been a vague mystery. According to the article that I found, that mashups are just a representation of our lack of concern for copyright laws. Especially with youtube, it is such a social thing that we only do to get attention that we often forget that we are breaking rules. The article concludes with how there is little hope for the future, which I guess is understandable but super depressing. He, Wu, and Shenghua Zha. "Insights Into The Adoption Of Social Media Mashups." Internet Research 24.2 (2014): 160-180. Academic Search Complete. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
Emily Rumpf's comment, November 11, 11:28 AM
The article that I read talks about the issues with the copyright law that mashups, and music sampling create. It talks about what is considered "fair use" and how much of a clip is too much. This article also talks about the history of mashups, and the repeated clash of this art form with the copyright law. New technology is emerging to make mashups even easier to produce, allowing creators to take many clips out of context and give them a different meaning. I believe that the copyright law and "fair use" act need to be more clear cut if we are ever to solve this constant conflict between mashups and copyright infringement. de Jesus, Joseph Georg Michael D. "Of Girl Talk And Dangerous Mice: Exploring The Clash Between Music Sampling, Mashups, And Copyright Law In The Digital Age." Ateneo Law Journal 57.4 (2013): 1175-1201. Academic Search Complete. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
Erik Lewis's comment, November 11, 12:05 PM
I found an article on the changing nature of copyright law. It outlined how ABC and a computer program have been cited for copyright infringement, as an example. The article makes it seem like the law's ideas of copyright may be shifting in the correct direction, and as someone who is very concerned with copyright law, that feels like a step in the right direction.

Samuelson, Pamela. "Updates On The Intellectual Property Front." Communications Of The ACM 57.11 (2014): 28-30. Academic Search Complete. Web. 11 Nov. 2014.
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Animoto Video Slideshow Competition

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Hali Aileen Barron's comment, October 28, 2:28 PM
Sean
Dallan Yoh's comment, October 28, 2:28 PM
Hali Barron
Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, October 28, 2:28 PM
I vote for sean
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Positive Externality, Increasing Returns, and the Rise in Cybercrimes

Positive Externality, Increasing Returns, and the Rise in Cybercrimes | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
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John Shank's comment, October 21, 2:38 PM
1. Digital Shredder CCleaner
John Shank's comment, October 21, 2:42 PM
2. Keep only a few credit cards and check yearly your credit record.
John Shank's comment, October 21, 2:48 PM
3. Monitor your phone and apps
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2014 Data Breach Investigations Report

2014 Data Breach Investigations Report | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Hear from Security Expert Wade Baker, as he simplifies last year’s security incidents and explains the nine attack patterns.
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Google Buys Nest Just As Internet Of Things Suffers First Global Cyber Attack

Google Buys Nest Just As Internet Of Things Suffers First Global Cyber Attack | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Nest's product design makes the smart home easy to use and Google can make their connectivity easy and secure. This could be a winning combination.
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Cyber Crime Spam

Cyber Crime Spam | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
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Megan Christel's comment, October 7, 5:47 PM
In the article I read, the authors weigh the costs and the benefits of the Internet for children. While the Internet can be a great tool for education and learning purposes, it can also have huge negative effects on their emotional and mental safety. Today, using computers and the Internet are practically fundamental in children's classrooms; even children as young as six or seven. Furthermore, by youth getting acquainted with the Internet at such an early age, they are more inclined to put their personal information out there, and in turn, this can lead to unwanted or inappropriate interactions online. It is extremely important that we begin to educated children on the potentially harmful aspects of using the Internet. Mitchell, Kimberly J., Janis Wolak, and David Finkelhor. "Are blogs putting youth at risk for online sexual solicitation or harassment?" Child Abuse & Neglect 32 (2008): 277-94. Web. 7 Oct. 2014.
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A Game that Plays with Private Information - The New Yorker

A Game that Plays with Private Information - The New Yorker | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
As the public debated the merits of the National Security Agency’s mass surveillance programs and its close ties with the technology companies that hold so much of the world’s personal data, an Austrian developer named Wolfie Christl arrived in New York City to receive an award for a video game he created, in which the player’s objective is to collect and sell as much private information as possible. The free online game is called Data Dealer. Using hackers, detectives, and Internet business schemes, you amass a cache of fictional private information, and then sell that data to corporations (like Star Mart), health-insurance companies, and the faintly disguised Central Security Agency. Christl and his small team originally released the game to German-speaking countries in April, 2012, and recently expanded it internationally with an English version. “At the moment, there is all this Prism and N.S.A. scandal, and for sure, information about people is often given by private companies to governmental agencies,” Christl told me. “In our game, you are selling the information to the government. In real life, you just give it away for free.” He erupted with a hearty laugh.
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Megan Christel's comment, September 30, 6:58 PM
In the article, "Facebook Privacy Settings: Who Cares?" (2010), the authors, Danah Boyd and Eszter Hargittai in a sense play "devil's advocate" to everything that we have discussed in class. We place so much emphasis on privacy online, but in all reality, who cares? The lack of privacy, for the vast majority of us, does not prevent us from using social media or online shopping. The authors found that despite all of the complaints and criticism against Facebook, their ability to attract users is still increasing. As a student of this course, it is definitely useful to become more aware of some of the ramifications of the lack of privacy online, but I know that for most of us, it won't stop us from using the Internet. Regardless of whether you care about the privacy settings on your social media sites, I still think it's important to know the costs and the benefits of the Internet. Boyd, Danah, and Eszter Hargittai. "Facebook Privacy Settings: Who Cares?" First Monday 15.8 (2010). Web. 30 Sept. 2014.
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College Lecture Series - Neil Postman - "The Surrender of Culture to Technology" - YouTube

A lecture delivered by Neil Postman on Mar. 11, 1997 in the Arts Center. Based on the author's book of the same title. Neil Postman notes the dependence of A...
John Shank's insight:

"...my five ideas about technological change. First, that we always pay a price for technology; the greater the technology, the greater the price. Second, that there are always winners and losers, and that the winners always try to persuade the losers that they are really winners. Third, that there is embedded in every great technology an epistemological, political or social prejudice. Sometimes that bias is greatly to our advantage. Sometimes it is not. The printing press annihilated the oral tradition; telegraphy annihilated space; television has humiliated the word; the computer, perhaps, will degrade community life. And so on. Fourth, technological change is not additive; it is ecological, which means, it changes everything and is, therefore, too important to be left entirely in the hands of Bill Gates. And fifth, technology tends to become mythic; that is, perceived as part of the natural order of things, and therefore tends to control more of our lives than is good for us."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 9, 12:45 PM

I don't scoop many videos, but Postman is someone I think is worth listening to and reading.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Google’s secret NSA alliance: The terrifying deals between Silicon Valley and the security state

Google’s secret NSA alliance: The terrifying deals between Silicon Valley and the security state | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Inside the high-level, complicated deals -- and the rise of a virtually unchecked surveillance power
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Sheet Music Piracy: You Can Get Everything For Free On The Internet

Sheet Music Piracy: You Can Get Everything For Free On The Internet | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Songwriters don't want their sheet music shared online. But are the laws against it out of date?
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Emily Kooistra's comment, November 18, 1:37 PM
The article I read related to intellectual property and the classroom. Many teachers create their own curriculum for classes, and the question arose, 'Who owns that curriculum?' Should teachers be creating custom courses, materials, etc... that can be sold to other teachers and districts. I think that adds a whole new element to teaching. This could potentially lead to all kids of certain grades and levels to be taking the same standardized course. But if everyone is learning the same thing the same way, is that actually good?

Johnson, Doug. "Who Owns That Course?." Educational Leadership 72.2 (2014): 83-84. Academic Search Complete. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.
Emily Kooistra's comment, November 18, 1:37 PM
The article I read related to intellectual property and the classroom. Many teachers create their own curriculum for classes, and the question arose, 'Who owns that curriculum?' Should teachers be creating custom courses, materials, etc... that can be sold to other teachers and districts. I think that adds a whole new element to teaching. This could potentially lead to all kids of certain grades and levels to be taking the same standardized course. But if everyone is learning the same thing the same way, is that actually good?

Johnson, Doug. "Who Owns That Course?." Educational Leadership 72.2 (2014): 83-84. Academic Search Complete. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.
Rachel P's comment, November 18, 1:39 PM
In this insightful article that I found on the internet, I learned about copyright. That's right, copyright. Now what exactly did I learn? More about how we never use it. This article talked about how we justify ourselves for never really caring about it and what not. Especially brought on by the new age of digital natives, there seems to never be a solution. However we can hope for the future to one day resolve these issues. Edwards, Lee, et al. "Discourse, Justification And Critique: Towards A Legitimate Digital Copyright Regime?." International Journal Of Cultural Policy 21.1 (2015): 60-77. Academic Search Complete. Web. 18 Nov. 2014.
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Big Data Will Change Our World - YouTube

Buzzwords aside, Big Data is likely to have a major impact on our world - amounting in a significant technological shift over the next data. Don't believe us...
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14 Insanely Simple Ways to Boost Smartphone Security

14 Insanely Simple Ways to Boost Smartphone Security | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Where is your smartphone right this second? I'm willing to bet that it's probably within arm's reach. At the very least, I'm guessing it's in the room with you. Smartphone use has skyrocketed over
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Google wins Viacom copyright lawsuit (Wired UK)

Google wins Viacom copyright lawsuit (Wired UK) | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Google-owned YouTube won a major victory Wednesday when a federal judge ruled the video-sharing site was protected under U.S. copyright law.
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Elisa Guatieri's comment, November 4, 1:14 PM
The article I chose discusses how a number of tracks have been flagged and removed from SoundCloud. SounCloud is know as the Youtube of audio. It was once known as a place for emerging producers to upload and share music for free. Famous Dj Kaskade had left the platform after 32 of his files were flagged as potential copyright violators and taken down. Kaskade later posted a letter on the website behhing lawmakers and other websites that share files to "free the music." In the meantime, DJs are having a hard time finding a home for covers, mashups, and remixes.
BUERGER, MEGAN. "Soundcloud Gets Heat From Illegal Licenses." Billboard 126.24 (2014): 13. Academic Search Complete. Web. 4 Nov. 2014.
Nyalima Esther Gaojia's comment, November 4, 1:22 PM
The atrucle that I chose to write about is called " Record
Title: The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle." by Michael O Eshleman talks about the reason why copyright exist and that is the benefit Anglo-American traditions and not the author. Copyright exist for a very long time the authors life pulse 75 years. The article also goes on to explain what goes on with the copyright law when it goes wrong. Eshleman, Michael O. The Copyright Wars: Three Centuries of Trans-Atlantic Battle. N.p.: n.p., n.d. Print.
Rachel P's comment, November 4, 1:33 PM
My article that I read was about internet addiction as a cause to why we do not properly copyright. I found it interesting that the author talked about how we never really think about our actions because it is something so second nature to us now. The internet seems bad but like why do we keep using it? Navarro, Jordana N., et al. "Addicted To Pillaging In Cyberspace: Investigating The Role Of Internet Addiction In Digital Piracy." Computers In Human Behavior 37.(2014): 101-106. Academic Search Complete. Web. 4 Nov. 2014.
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Penn State Berks: Berks campus alerted to anonymous threat on social media

Penn State Berks: Berks campus alerted to anonymous threat on social media | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
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Preventing a 'Cyber-Pearl Harbor' | PBS NewsHour

Preventing a 'Cyber-Pearl Harbor' | PBS NewsHour | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Government-funded DETERlab was built to bring established scientific principles to the field of cybersecurity in hopes of preventing successful cyber attacks on targets such as power grids, banks and train systems. Correspondent Tom Bearden reports on the project's hopes for a nation "wholly vulnerable" to such threats. Continue reading →
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Norse - IPViking Live

But the scope and scale of hacking attacks between the two countries, and in fact between attackers and targets around the world, can be hard to imagine—until you check out this oddly mesmerizing real-time map that shows cyber-attacks ricocheting across the globe. The map was created by Norse, a US-based company that monitors malware and spyware.

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State faces millions of cyber attacks per day, department head says | KSL.com

State faces millions of cyber attacks per day, department head says | KSL.com | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
The state's secure government networks face an alarming number of cyber attacks. They happen daily, are continuing to grow in number, and have spiked in recent years.
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Norton CyberCrime Reports: The Human Impact of Cyber Crime | Digital Threat

Norton CyberCrime Reports: The Human Impact of Cyber Crime | Digital Threat | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
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Emily Kooistra's comment, October 14, 1:13 PM
The article I read discussed cybersecurity in the classroom. There was a large scale survey completed by k-12 teachers, administrators, and technology cooridnators. The research showed that most teachers and adminstrators feel it is important that cybersecurity be taught, most are completely untrained. However there is a discrepancy between the views of all three groups. A majority of Teachers feel that this is best taught by parents, while technology coordinators feel that this should most likely be taught in the classroom. I think this is because technology coordinators feel as though a professional with training and experience should pass down that information.

Mary Beth, Marklein, and TODAY USA. "Study: Teachers lack online training." USA Today n.d.: Academic Search Complete. Web. 14 Oct. 2014.
Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, October 14, 1:19 PM
"investigating online harassment and offline violence among young people in Thailand: methodological approaches, lessons learned." This article talks about how crimes are committed through the internet in thailand. Age group targeted is between the ages of 15-24 years. These are highschoolers and college kids that are being attacked through,cyber bullying, identity theft and also having their accounts hacked. This was achieved through constant use of the internet and also through classmates and strangers. These is is done through collecting data and personal issues from minors online. http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=41b9bf5a-8ef7-4dfb-9c96-54cb0cf6bc1d%40sessionmgr113&hid=106&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=a9h&AN=98201931
Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, October 14, 1:19 PM
"investigating online harassment and offline violence among young people in Thailand: methodological approaches, lessons learned." This article talks about how crimes are committed through the internet in thailand. Age group targeted is between the ages of 15-24 years. These are highschoolers and college kids that are being attacked through,cyber bullying, identity theft and also having their accounts hacked. This was achieved through constant use of the internet and also through classmates and strangers. These is is done through collecting data and personal issues from minors online. http://web.b.ebscohost.com/ehost/detail/detail?vid=3&sid=41b9bf5a-8ef7-4dfb-9c96-54cb0cf6bc1d%40sessionmgr113&hid=106&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZSZzY29wZT1zaXRl#db=a9h&AN=98201931
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Facebook wants you to run a quick privacy checkup on your profile

Facebook wants you to run a quick privacy checkup on your profile | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Facebook on Thursday announced that it will expand its "Privacy Checkup" feature.
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Kate-Ashlyn Akou-Adjei's comment, October 7, 12:10 PM
"First Comes Love, Then Comes Google: An Investigation of Uncertainty Reduction Strategies and Self-Disclosure in Online Dating." This was an article i read about privacy on online dating websites. It was brought to my knowledge that, adequate background checks are not run on these individuals that sign up on these dating websites. Just having a password to your profile or putting up those supposed privacy settings does not really protect you. There amount of data these websites request is unimaginable, your address, phone number, location ... name it! not to forget the ones that have you paying monthly actually take credit cards information. How sure are we that these systems are not broken into daily by hackers and identity thieves. I mean this might sound outrageous and ridiculous, but maybe in the future before sign up on a website or social network, a tour of their database and systems will definitely be required just to know what exactly we are getting ourselves into. Jennifer, Gibbs, Ellinson Nicole, and Lai Chih-hui. Michigan: communication research, Feb2011, V. Print.
Dallan Yoh's comment, October 7, 1:34 PM
The article I chose discusses the costs of posting information about yourself online. The main examples it gives are about how the data on your profile from one website, such as Twitter or Facebook (which are free sites), can be released to other websites at no cost. So the information you think is exclusive to your profile is actually being given to countless other websites. So the question becomes: who is seeing your information? That question has no answer though and it makes you wonder how much privacy you still hold on the internet, if you even have any. METZ, RACHEL. "Site Asks Social Networkers To Rethink Revelations." Community College Week (2010): 21. Academic Search Complete. Web. 1 Oct. 2014.
Elisa Guatieri's comment, October 8, 10:56 PM
The article that I read, "Think Twice Before Posting Online," talks about how most people on social networks are not aware of the importance of the user agreements and terms of services while they post on social networks. People are uploading text, photos, and videos without understanding that anything they post is then becomes part of public domain forever. Anything you say on twitter, for example, can be viewed all around the world the second you "tweet" it. There are users that are concerned with copyright laws but they need to think twice about what they are posting on social network sites.Centanni, Jillian A. Think Twice Before Posting Online. Newark, Jew Jersey: n.p., n.d. Print.