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Judge approves settlement with publishers over e-books

Judge approves settlement with publishers over e-books | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
A judge approved on Thursday a Justice Department settlement with three publishers accused of conspiring with Apple and other publishers to ...
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CAS 383: Culture and Technology
Class Resources for Penn State Berks CAS 383 Course.
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Google: Brace Yourselves for the Data Explosion

Google: Brace Yourselves for the Data Explosion | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Google CEO Eric Schmidt says a data tsunami is coming -- and we're totally unprepared to handle the deluge. He's right.
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corina piller's comment, September 17, 1:27 PM
Eddy, Nathan. "Online Privacy A Major Concern For Americans." Eweek (2014): 1. Academic Search Complete. Web. 17 Sept. 2014.
Sean's comment, September 18, 12:39 PM
During our last class, we briefly alighted upon the subject of Yik Yak, its offending properties, and the cause of these properties. While we did not come to a firm conclusion, the general direction of the conversation was not that Yik Yak, as a technology, was harmful, but rather what its existence allowed, which was access to easy, “anonymous” conversation with those in your local area. What such a device engenders, the class seemed to say, was for people to be jerks to each other on a far grander, and easier, scale than ever before. And that isn’t untrue.
My problem, though, with such a line of thinking is it ignores the social construction of anonymity on the internet. Why does the polarization of community driven electronic discourse seem culturally inevitable? To further my understanding of this line of thought, I read “Entanglements in Practice: Performing Anonymity Through Social Media,” by Scott and Orlikowski. Over the course of their paper, they advocate understanding anonymity through the lens of sociomateriality, which means with an awareness of the inter/intraconnectedness of meaning and matter. That is to say, we cannot have one without the other. This applies to the concept of anonymity in that anonymity cannot exist beyond the constraints of materiality, and so to understand the nature of anonymity, we must understand these constraints. These material bounds, however, are explicitly tied to the meaning of anonymity, as they could not exist as they are without the concept which they represent. This is all a complex, and rather disjointed, way of saying that we must observe how anonymity is performed, including what is said and unsaid, the means through which it is said, and the context for those means.
Though the piece is ultimately an exploration in using Barad’s concept of sociomateriality as a lens through which a greater understanding of social media can be gained, several points were made which relate to our class at large. The most salient of these points is a brief discussion on the process of deindividualization that occurs through practices of anonymity. “People tend to be less self aware, engage less in self evaluation and are less concerned about social comparison and evaluation… people generally are less inhibited [and]… may also experience a dissociation of their online pseudonyms from their offline selves which makes them feel less accountable for inappropriate online social behavior” (876).

Scott, Susan V. and Wanda J. Orlikowski. “Entanglements in Practice: Performing Anonymity Through Social Media.” MIS Quarterly 38.3 (2014): 873-893. Academic Search Complete. Web. 18 Sept. 2014.
gearson contreras's comment, September 18, 3:49 PM
thanks to social media, it is hard to keep things from others to know about you and your life. if we wan tto kno what bob did yesterday, we simply go on facebook and check his status. this is what this article talks about. of how easy and fast it is to know about a person we know or don't know. http://go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?action=interpret&id=GALE%7CA373254373&v=2.1&u=carl39591&it=r&p=LT&sw=w&authCount=1
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On overload

On overload | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
WE LIVE in an age of distraction. Teenagers tap text messages during dinner; students idly surf the Web instead of taking notes in class; office workers add to their Amazon wish lists. It's not just...
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Hali Aileen Barron's comment, September 17, 3:03 PM
In the article I read, Wi-Fi is the New Cigarette written by Rishona Campbell it states that over 61% of Americans have access to Wi-Fi in their homes. We this statement you can assume that the families using this Wi-Fi are for a newer advancement of technology such as cellphones, Ps4, Xbox, Smart TVs, laptops, tablets, etc. So, with over 61% of Americans having this access in their house unleashes a question: Who exactly has access through this Wi-Fi? Because of the advances in technology over the last couple decades we have found out not only have we became lazy because of such technologies, but we have also become ignorant. Any hacker can fully mirror an individual’s computer with access to their IP Address which is produced over the Wi-Fi. This is showing we have become ignorant of our privacy. We have abused this privilege that was given to us and now we cannot take it back.
Campbell, Rishona. Wi-Fi is the New Cigarette. Vol. 0 . N.p.: DashBurst, 2014. N. pag. Web. 25 Mar. 2014. <http://blog.dashburst.com/infographic/wi-fi-new-cigarette/>.
Payden Rybicki's comment, September 18, 10:50 AM
The article I read was about how schools are expanding their technology to the students. Although in California they just passed a law that restricts some of the technology used from kindergarten through high school. People are saying it is a landmark law that could change how people look at technology in schools. In the law they prohibited educational sites, apps and cloud services because they disclose personal information for the students which they don't want at all. This law will become very important to society in the future because technology only grows it never tracts backwards.
http://sk8es4mc2l.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&issn=03624331&title=New%20York%20Times&volume=163&issue=56625&date=20140915&atitle=With%20Tech%20Taking%20Over%20In%20Schools%2C%20Worries%20Rise.&spage=B1&pages=&sid=EBSCO:Academic%20Search%20Complete&aulast=SINGER,%20NATASHA

Singer, Natasha. "With Tech Taking Over in Schools, Worries Rise." The New York Times 15 Sept. 2014: 1. Print
Payden Rybicki's comment, September 18, 10:50 AM
The article I read was about how schools are expanding their technology to the students. Although in California they just passed a law that restricts some of the technology used from kindergarten through high school. People are saying it is a landmark law that could change how people look at technology in schools. In the law they prohibited educational sites, apps and cloud services because they disclose personal information for the students which they don't want at all. This law will become very important to society in the future because technology only grows it never tracts backwards.
http://sk8es4mc2l.search.serialssolutions.com/?genre=article&issn=03624331&title=New%20York%20Times&volume=163&issue=56625&date=20140915&atitle=With%20Tech%20Taking%20Over%20In%20Schools%2C%20Worries%20Rise.&spage=B1&pages=&sid=EBSCO:Academic%20Search%20Complete&aulast=SINGER,%20NATASHA

Singer, Natasha. "With Tech Taking Over in Schools, Worries Rise." The New York Times 15 Sept. 2014: 1. Print
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Scholars Turn Their Attention to Attention

Scholars Turn Their Attention to Attention | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
New insights into the nature of learning, memory, and intelligence may prove valuable in the classroom, David Glenn reports.
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Emily Kooistra's comment, September 9, 11:12 AM
The article I read spoke about how a pharmaceutical school in Buffalo is handling the constant multitasking of their students. The school's professors have noticed a drastic decrease in the amount of reading that students will do and how that can negatively impact their critical thinking skills. Most classrooms do not allow students to bring laptops in order to make sure they give the professor their undivided attention. They were also looking at ways to block cell signal in classrooms so students could use their phones either. In a way I think this is naive. Technology and multitasking are things that are not going to disappear and are going to be a very big part of their students' futures. Instead of completely blocking out these new devices, I think the school should be looking for innovative ways to incorporate those types of devices in their classroom and get students to exercise focus. Brazeau, Gayle A., and Daniel A. Brazeau. "The Challenge Of Educating In A Highly-Connected And Multitasking World." American Journal Of Pharmaceutical Education 75.7 (2011): 1-2. Academic Search Complete. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.

http://web.b.ebscohost.com.ezaccess.libraries.psu.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=d4692f05-3192-4fe6-a065-e00e74bc9672%40sessionmgr113&vid=10&hid=120
Elisa Guatieri's comment, September 9, 1:35 PM
The article I read was about a study that was published by a psychologist at the University of Utah, who found that it is more distracting for drivers to be talking on their cell phone than having a conversation with passengers. During the research, 41 drivers were paired with friends. In the first experiment the driver used a hands free cell phone to talk to the passenger who was not in the car. In the second experiment they both driver and passenger were in the car. In the third experiment, they were both in the car but did not have a conversation. The conclusion was that drivers having a conversation on a cell phone was 4 times more likely to miss pulling off at a rest area(as previously instructed in the experiment) as those talking to passengers in person. They were also more likely to drift in lanes and keep more distance between their car and the one in front of them.
Elisa Guatieri's comment, September 9, 1:35 PM
"Cell phone use more distracting to drivers than with chatting with passengers." Harvard Mental Health Letter Feb. 2009: 7+. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.
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Is Google Making Us Stupid?

Is Google Making Us Stupid? | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
What the Internet is doing to our brains
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Elisa Guatieri's comment, September 4, 6:11 PM
Rosen, Larry D., Mark L. Carrier, and Nancy A. Cheever. N.p., May 2013. EBSCOhost. Web. 4 Sept. 2014.
Sasha Henry's comment, September 9, 7:59 AM
The article read was “Is Google Making us Stupid,” by Nicholas Carr. He postulates that the advent of the internet, and the continued use of search engines capable of finding information we need in a matter of seconds, has changed the way humans process information. According to Carr, we are no longer able to patiently look for information, and instead expect information to be presented the way the internet does it, failure to which we grow impatient with the source. Our brains have become rewired to skim through information, rather than engage in deep reading. This is in line with Dudley’s assertion that the internet and the coming of third generation technologies, has changed how humans process information, and made the human mind much slower and lacking in essential analytical skills.
Carr, Nicholas. “Is Google Making Us Stupid.” The Atlantic, 1 July 2008. <http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2008/07/is-google-making-us-stupid/306868/>;
Emily Rumpf's comment, September 9, 9:36 AM
This article emphasizes the connection between a adolescent's shyness and their problematic internet use. As one of the disadvantages of the internet, mentioned in class, adolescents can be victims of cyberbullying or solicitations. This study shows that if a child tends to be more shy there is a direct correlation and increase in their problematic internet use, than one who is more social with their peers. This directly relates to some of the issues addressed in the Frontline video. Huan, Vivien S., et al. "The Impact Of Shyness On Problematic Internet Use: The Role Of Loneliness." Journal Of Psychology 148.6 (2014): 699-715. Academic Search Complete. Web. 9 Sept. 2014.
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The Insidiousness of Facebook Messenger's Mobile App Terms of Service

The Insidiousness of Facebook Messenger's Mobile App Terms of Service | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
How much access to your (and your friends') personal data are you prepared to share for access to free mobile apps? I suspect the amount is significantly less than that which you actually agreed to share when blindly accepting the Terms of Service.
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The impact of technology cartoon

The impact of technology cartoon | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
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The Ideal Length for All Online Content

The Ideal Length for All Online Content | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Learn the ideal length of Facebook posts, tweets, blog posts, Google+ headlines, title tags, paragraphs, and so much more.
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Best Tech Stories from Around the Web (March 31-April 4) | MIT Technology Review

Best Tech Stories from Around the Web (March 31-April 4) | MIT Technology Review | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
A roundup of the most interesting stories from other sites, collected by the staff at MIT Technology Review.
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How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information?

How Are Students’ Roles Changing in the New Economy of Information? | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Beyond increasing the amount of information that students can access, the new abundant economy of information has far greater implications. It represents both a shift in the way that future classrooms will operate as well as in the student behaviors that we will value and expect.
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Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift for $2 Billion | MIT Technology Review

Why Facebook Bought Oculus Rift for $2 Billion | MIT Technology Review | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Facebook acquired Oculus Rift because it believes virtual reality could be the next big thing after mobile.
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Wi-Fi Is the New Cigarette #infographic

Wi-Fi Is the New Cigarette #infographic | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Cigarette smoking has decreased over 20% among American adults since the 1960s. This doesn’t mean, however, that we’ve turned our back on our addictive tendencies. Instead we’ve found other vices to consume us.

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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8 Ways Tech Has Completely Rewired Our Brains

8 Ways Tech Has Completely Rewired Our Brains | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Thanks to technology, our brains are being rewired -- for better or worse.
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Hali Aileen Barron's comment, August 31, 11:19 AM

Going through a paradigm shift into the technology era definitely has multiple changes and reactions to such technology when it comes to the human brain. Such as constantly using technology from the time we wake up to when we go to bed. In this article, “8 ways Tech has completely rewired our brains” by Rebecca Hiscott shows how even when we sleep we dream differently. Showing how individuals that grew up with black and white televisions which more so dream in black and white to the younger generation who dream in color due to our progress in technology. This distinct example shows how the paradigm shift for our generation is just beginning.

Hiscott, Rebecca. 8 ways Tech has comepletely rewired our brains. New York City: Mashable, 2014. N. pag. American Psychological Assocation. Web. 31 Aug. 2014. <http://mashable.com/2014/03/14/tech-brains-neuroplasticity/>.
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KPCB Internet Trends - May 29th, 2013

Among the highlights: Emerging markets continue to lead in the 8% year-over-year growth in global Internet users, with China adding the most (264 million users
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Psychiatrist's view: Yik Yak is most dangerous app I've ever seen

Psychiatrist's view: Yik Yak is most dangerous app I've ever seen | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Here’s something important our society seems to be afraid to say out loud: Despite its name, “social media” is an inherently antisocial medium.
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Jeanine Snow's curator insight, September 13, 8:30 AM

This app has taken over in a matter of days and is causing a culture change!

Sasha Henry's comment, September 18, 11:51 AM
Given that social media users have the ability to control their individual privacy to some extent, is it wrong for third parties such as corporations or government to utilize this information for profiling?
Social Networking Privacy: How to be Safe, Secure and Social. Privacy Rights Clearinghouse.
Retrieved from https://www.privacyrights.org/social-networking-privacy-how-be-safe-secure-and-social
Megan Christel's comment, September 18, 1:47 PM
In the article I read, it explains that on Facebook, people are typically only more likely to adjust their privacy settings if they've had issues, otherwise, most people do not even bother to look into the privacy settings. Even for those that may have restrictions on their profile pages, they may not take into account the number of friends they have, which can be just as "dangerous" or detrimental to one's privacy. Overall, people underestimate social media sites like Facebook, and all of the effects they may have on our individual privacy. Debatin, Bernhard, Jennette P. Lovejoy, Ann-Kathrin Horn, and Brittany N. Hughes. "Facebook and Online Privacy: Attitudes, Behaviors, and Unintended Consequences." Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 15.1 (2009): 83-108. Web. 18 Sept. 2014.
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The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology

The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester


Abstract

This paper reports on an observation of 70 university students’ use of their personal social network site (SNS), Facebook, over a 22-week university study period. The study sought to determine the extent that university students use their personal SNSs to support learning by exploring frequencies of academic-related content and topics being discussed. The findings reported in the paper reveal that students used their personal SNSs to discuss academic-related topics, particularly to share experiences about doing work or procrastinating, course content and grades. Mapping academic-related activity frequencies over the 22 weeks illustrated that around certain points in the academic calendar, particularly times when students’ assignments or exams were nearing, academic activity increased, suggesting that SNSs may play an important role in a students’ academic experience.

The findings suggest that many students today may be leaving traces of their academic journey online and that academics should be aware that these interactions may also exist in their own students’ online social spaces. This study offers opportunities for future research, particularly research which seeks to determine differences between individuals’ academic activity, the extent that intensive SNSs use supports or distracts students from learning, as well as the extent to which universities should or can harness SNSs to improve the student experience.

Keywords: informal learning; social networking; Facebook; university students; social network sites


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Claire Brooks's curator insight, September 7, 3:33 AM

remember to connect to Naomi Barnes

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 8, 8:25 AM

The academic journey of university students on Facebook: an analysis of informal academic-related activity over a semester | Vivian | Research in Learning Technology

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What the Internet is Doing to Our Brains - YouTube

Most of us are on the Internet on a daily basis and whether we like it or not, the Internet is affecting us. It changes how we think, how we work, and it eve...
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The Amazing Ways The Google Car Will Change the World | Visual.ly

The Amazing Ways The Google Car Will Change the World | Visual.ly | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
We've all heard about Google's plans to launch a self-driving car, but perhaps few of us have really gotten to grips with the full implications. Self-
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Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet

Looking Ahead: The Future of the Internet | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
What will the internet look like in the near future, 20 years, 100 years? We explore the possibilities in this illustration.

Via Lauren Moss
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Jim Doyle's curator insight, August 17, 6:37 AM

The Future of the Internet

Idris Grant's curator insight, August 25, 3:31 PM

With all the talk of "The Internet of Things," and the rapid advances we're seeing with all-things web, smart devices and hyper-connected world, we found this Infographic goes a long way to tell the story.

Edgar Mata's curator insight, September 1, 10:10 PM

¿Cómo será la internet dentro de 20 años?

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Studying the Digital Self

Studying the Digital Self | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Five analytical concepts can guide scholarship on virtual lives.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 25, 12:08 AM

This looks very interesting for anyone involved in research and academic work.

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» The Collapse of Complex Business Models Clay Shirky

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An Inside Look At News Curation Apps from the RJI Futures Lab


Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's curator insight, March 30, 1:37 PM



This short but quite interesting video update looks at emerging news curation apps designed to gather and select the most relevant news for their users. 

Circa's David Cohn, Inside's Jason Calacanis and Newsy's Jim Spencer provide key insight into what their news discovery services are offering and how they use curation to achieve this result.  


The video covers also the value of curation over original journalism and issues of copyright and fair use.


Interesting. Informative. 7/10


Original video: http://youtu.be/Gf3SYrt2Jgw 



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socialcompany's curator insight, May 23, 9:04 AM

stories behind circa, inside, newsy, good short videos.

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The Technologists' Siren Song

The Technologists' Siren Song | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Hucksters for innovation play down its political, economic, and environmental costs.
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Communication Theory as a Field

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Meet the 'Most Connected Man' in the World

Meet the 'Most Connected Man' in the World | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
45-year-old Chris Dancy is known as "the most connected guy in the world."
John Shank's insight:

Is this a glimpse into the future of a "connected human"?

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Net neutrality is dead. Bow to Comcast and Verizon, your overlords

Net neutrality is dead. Bow to Comcast and Verizon, your overlords | CAS 383: Culture and Technology | Scoop.it
Advocates of a free and open Internet could see this coming, but today's ruling from a Washington appeals court striking down the FCC's rules protecting the open net was worse than the most dire forecasts.
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