Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene, staying with the trouble at Fukushima
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Fukushima: a strange kind of homecoming

Fukushima: a strange kind of homecoming | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
One year on from Japan’s Fukushima nuclear disaster, the Unuma family return to the exclusion zone and what was once their farm
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Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima
2016 es el año en el que convergen dos acontecimientos de escala global. Por una parte, la posible confirmación por la Comisión Internacional de Estatigrafía de que estamos en una nueva época geológica, el Antropoceno, marcado por la radical afección de la tierra por la actividad humana. Por otra, el quinto aniversario de la explosión de multiples reactores nucleares en Fukushima a 200 km del area urbana más populosa del planeta. Las definiciones de ambos acontecimientos están en disputa. La tesis del Antropoceno es problematizada por otras formulaciones críticas como las del Capitaloceno (Moore), con énfasis en las relaciones de capital y trabajo, o el Chthuluceno (Haraway), como una propuesta para escapar del excepcionalismo humano. Como ya sucediera anteriormente en Chernobyl, la catástrofe nuclear de Fukushima es un tipo de problema presentado por las autoridades como “bajo control” frente a un enorme dispenso por amplios sectores de población y especialistas que denuncian la existencia de unas políticas de invisibilidad (Kuchinskaya, Downer, Petryna, Yablokov, Ross, Alexievich). ¿Cómo se relacionan ambos acontecimientos? ¿Qué aporta Fukushima a las actuales discusiones sobre el Antropoceno? Situándonos en el tiempo de las catástrofes (Stengers) respondemos a la sugerencia de Haraway de permanecer con el problema y a su incitación a la investigación a partir de la ciencia ficción. Apoyándonos del trabajo de una larga serie de escritores, científicos, y artistas, llevamos a cabo una especulación fabulativa sobre el significado de Fukushima como una lucha situada a partir de las figuras de Antropos, del Capital y de Chthulu y sus respectivas máquinas de contar historias.
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Journey to the Safest Place on Earth

www.journeytothesafestplaceonearth.com The lethal, highly radioactive nuclear waste from decades of nuclear power use is to be disposed of in final repositories…
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Japan's nuclear crisis: Fukushima's legacy of fear

Japan's nuclear crisis: Fukushima's legacy of fear | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
Japan's worst-ever nuclear accident displaced more than 100,000 people. Many could now safely return home.
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Costs and Consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi Disaster | PSR

Costs and Consequences of the Fukushima Daiichi Disaster | PSR | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
The destruction of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant resulted in the massive radioactive contamination of the Japanese mainland.
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The Sublime Language of My Century

The Sublime Language of My Century | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
what if we took a more daring, modernist, de-familiarizing approach to writing theory? What if we asked of theory as a genre that it be as interesting, as strange, as poetically or narratively as rich as we ask our poetry or fiction to be? What if we treated it not as high theory, with pretentions to legislate or interpret other genres; but as low theory, as having no greater or lesser claim to speak of the world than any other. It might be more fun to read. It might tell us something about the world. It might, just might, enable us to act in the world otherwise.
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Just 90 companies caused two-thirds of man-made global warming emissions

Just 90 companies caused two-thirds of man-made global warming emissions | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
has been published in the journal Climatic Change
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Nuclear power plant accidents: listed and ranked since 1952

Nuclear power plant accidents: listed and ranked since 1952 | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
How many nuclear power plants have had accidents and incidents? Get the full list and find out how they're ranked
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Chernobyl survivor's ink-wash art pays tribute to Fukushima

A Belarusian man is making ink-wash paintings themed on the nuclear disasters in Chernobyl and Fukushima as a way to support their recovery efforts. "I hop
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The Not-Quite-Robots That Help Fix Fusion Reactors

At Culham Centre for Fusion Energy -- http://ccfe.ac.uk -- my camera's being held by a robot. Well, not really by a robot. It's being held by a man calle
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Five Propositions | Critiques for the Anthropocene - GeoCritique

Five Propositions | Critiques for the Anthropocene - GeoCritique | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
Five Propositions | Critiques for the Anthropocene   Anja Kanngieser, University of Wollongong Angela Last, University of Glasgow   What we are trying to address in this paper follows on, in a way, from other[...]
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Filmar os seres de luz: desafio ao cineasta do século XXI

As últimas notícias, opinião, fotos e vídeos de Lisboa, Porto, Portugal, Europa e do Mundo. A melhor fonte de informação de economia, política, cultura, ciência, tecnologia, life&style e viagens.
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The Anthropocene - with Jan Zalasiewicz and Christian Schwägerl

The human epoch, and how it shapes our planet. Jan Zalasiewiczand Christian Schwägerl discuss the innovations, fears and promise of a pivotal moment i
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The biological impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the pale grass blue butterfly

The biological impacts of the Fukushima nuclear accident on the pale grass blue butterfly | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
e
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Anthropocene vs Capitalocene: a Reflection on the Question, “What Have I Done?”

The International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) has yet to recognize, for scientific reasons, our current geological epoch as the Anthropocene, or “A
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The Anthropocene Truism

The Anthropocene Truism | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
If we are to avoid this trap, Purdy thinks we need to learn the core political lesson of his story—which at its heart is not about the politics of nature, but about democracy. This is a history in which democracy is constantly evaded, decision-making is removed from collective politics by appeals to “natural systems,” and anti-politics creeps back in. The earliest “natural” system to circumvent democracy was a hierarchical, exclusionary political order. That was gradually dismantled by Hobbes and his heirs, who saw politics as artificial, something made by people. The second was the naturalized system of the free market and free ownership, the idea of a spontaneous economic order, which was likewise gradually dismantled—albeit often only temporarily—in the 20th century. The last natural system to fall was nature itself. That is what defines, Purdy writes, the newest phase “in a country that has always been Anthropocene.” If we’re clear-eyed, Purdy hopes, we’ll come to see that what’s left is artificial politics—the politics we make together. Technology and economics can’t save us: Both repeat the old fantasy and faith that politics can be avoided.

But we want that politics to be democratic. It’s become a cliché that if we’re going to tackle climate change successfully, we’ll need democratic self-restraint: Rich states and their citizens will need to control themselves, cut carbon emissions, and consume less. Purdy makes the case that democratic self-restraint relies on democratic self-assertion; only a properly democratic movement can actively choose (and maintain) that self-restraint and shape nature in the right kind of way. Nature has always been something made and imagined by us. The real challenge of the Anthropocene is not to face up to that fact; Purdy’s book does that for us. Instead, it’s to create a politics that confronts both environmental problems and those of inequality, exclusion, and capitalism, by building the kind of mass democracy that appeals to nature have always been used to avoid.
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Fresh Tales of Chaos Emerge From Early in Nuclear Crisis

Fresh Tales of Chaos Emerge From Early in Nuclear Crisis | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
In the initial 24 hours after a massive earthquake and tsunami struck in March, the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant descended into crisis far more quickly than previously understood, a Wall Street Journal reconstruction shows.
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VLAGYIMIR SEVCSENKO NEHÉZ HETEK KRÓNIKÁJA

Vlagyimir Sevcsenko - Nehéz hetek krónikája A filmet letölthetitek innen, magyar felirattal: http://nehezhetek.uw.hu Facebook oldal
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Why a green future needs nuclear power - or not

Why a green future needs nuclear power - or not | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
Jonathon Porritt finds Mark Lynas's latest pro-nuclear tome 'gratifyingly short' and reasonably open-minded. But Lynas falls into the trap of seeing nuclear technologies as fast developing, while renewables are stuck - when the reverse is the case!
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At Chernobyl and Fukushima, radioactivity has seriously harmed wildlife

At Chernobyl and Fukushima, radioactivity has seriously harmed wildlife | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
How do we measure long-term impacts of nuclear accidents? Studies at Chernobyl and Fukushima show that radiation has harmed animals, birds and insects and reduced biodiversity at both sites.
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#Fukushima, vidas contaminadas

#Fukushima, vidas contaminadas | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it

El 11 de marzo de 2011, una brutal sacudida a 130 kilómetros de la costa mató a miles de personas y cambió la historia de Japón para siempre. El país volvía a encontrarse con uno de sus grandes demonios: la pesadilla nuclear. El accidente de la central de Fukushima provocó la evacuación de unas 100.000 personas y una situación de emergencia solo comparable a la de las bombas atómicas de la II Guerra Mundial. Cinco años después, miles de japoneses siguen viviendo en barracones bajo la amenaza de la radiación.

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Fukushima Mon Amour: the Hucksters of the Green Atom

Fukushima Mon Amour: the Hucksters of the Green Atom | Anthropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene,  staying with the trouble at Fukushima | Scoop.it
Is the crisis in Fukushima over or just beginning? You might be forgiven for scratching your head at that one. Nearly five years after the nuclear meltdown triggered by the Tohoku earthquake and subsequent tsunami, one of the planet’s worst radioactive catastrophes has almost completely faded from both the media and public consciousness. Amid that information void, the lethal history of those events has been swamped under pernicious myths being spread by nuclear hucksters.

In brief, the revised story of the Fukushima meltdown goes something like this: the Daiichi facility was struck by an unprecedented event, unlikely to be repeated; the failsafe systems worked; the meltdown was swiftly halted; the spread of radioactive contamination contained and remediated; no lives or illnesses resulted from the crisis. Full-speed ahead!
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