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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.

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Where Does the South Begin? - Atlantic Mobile

Where Does the South Begin? - Atlantic Mobile | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it

This article asks about the vernacular region of the "South." Namely, it asks if Washington, D.C. was or is a southern city. As I am in Washington for the next week, I think this is an excellent question, even if the article is over a year old.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 6, 2012 10:31 AM
Love it! I'd rescoop from here but I want the "non-mobile URL." Just wanted you to know that I got it from here and appreciate your work.
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The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays

The Border That Stole 500 Birthdays | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it
The story behind the the International Date Line.

 

Not too long ago (Jan. 2012), the arbitrary International Date Line (roughly opposite the Prime Meridian) was moved to better accommodate the regional networks and economic geography of the area straddling the line.  American Samoa, although politically aligned with the United States, was functionally more integrated on the Asian side of the Pacific Rim when it came to their trade partners and their tourism base.  Dynamic economic networks, political allegiances and cultural commonalities create a beautifully complex situation near this 'border.'    


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 4:42 PM

It made sense for American Samoa to ask for the move even though it is US territory.  It is more closely linked with the economies of the China, Japan, Australia, New Zeland and South Korea.  For them to all be on the same day just makes sense.  You can coordinate things better if everyone is on the same day, financial markets and be in line when the trading day starts and ends.  Seems to me to make sense that they are on the same day as their main economic partners.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:42 AM

This line clearly needs to be redrawn.  It just does not make sense that it could be monday in one area and tuesday 50 miles directly south of it.  While the new dateline does not necessarily have to be perfectly straight, it should at least not go directly horizontal as it does now.  Whoever lies on the line must deal with whatever place they have been placed in, and not complain.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:05 AM

My class examined this and we agree that it makes sense that American Samoa would want to be those they do business with like Asia, Australia and New Zealand.  ALthough American Samoa is a US territory, it definately does more business with the countries who are nearby and therefore they should be pushed to the other side of the dateline.

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GIS for home buyers

GIS for home buyers | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it
Whoa, check out Trulia Local - A visual way to explore crime, schools, home prices, and local data.

 

The map above was generated to display the areas within a 30 minute commute of Rhode Island College in Providence.  This site generates commuting maps and other layers that are especially pertinent for home buyers---schools, crime stats, property values and local amenities.  This is GIS data brought to the real estate shopping community, but consider this a project in the making.  One of the best exercises to get to know a place holistically is to shop for housing and make some locational analysis decisions.


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Immigrants Don't Take Jobs, They Create Them: Why We Need More Immigration - Business - GOOD

Immigrants Don't Take Jobs, They Create Them: Why We Need More Immigration - Business - GOOD | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it

The United States allows a minuscule number of immigrants into the country legally. For the sake of the economy, we need to let more in.


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A map of sloth

A map of sloth | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it

Counting the world's couch potatoesA NEW paper published in the Lancet on July 18th, timed to coincide with the Olympics, compares countries’ rates of physical activity.


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Gentrification in Providence

Gentrification in Providence | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it

KV: Development of a high end apartment complex in a low income area would force pre-gentrification people out of the neighborhood. The taxes would get raised to amounts that make it difficult for these people to afford. However, the people in charge of this project are ignoring the consequences and focusing on the 5 million dollars tax break. 

 

SD: This sign went up in to 2006 protest the mills-to-condo developments in Providence, Rhode Island.  The photographer's work can be found at: http://www.flickr.com/photos/abbeychristine/sets/72157625977867607/


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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:41 AM
Gentrification has both positive and negative affects on the city. I believe that it is beneficial for a city to take older buildings and utilize them or flip them into malls or financially beneficial businesses for their economy. But on the other hand you are taking people who were living in these areas with low rent and after you flip these buildings the rent is going to rise substancially. Therefore these former residents cannot afford to stay in the apartments and have to relocate their homes. Its hard to pick a side.
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World's Biggest Power Blackout in Human History Hits India

The second day of India's power grid failures were worse than the first. Nearly 1900 miles of India went dark, an area that is home to nearly half of India's...

 

How is this issue geographic?  What themes are present in this issue and how are they interrelated? 


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Concentric Zones of Building Age in Chicago

Concentric Zones of Building Age in Chicago | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it
    Hughie, hold my halo. I’m sick of being a saint: Got to teach youngsters To hit ‘em where they ain’t. -Ogden Nash   Many of the original and innovative contributions to the field o...

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Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape

Border Economies: the Maquiladora Export Landscape | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it

Maquiladoras are a well-known example of developed countries outsourcing factory work that is cited as a factor leading to de-industrialization in the Northeastern USA.  While many geography classes discuss this macro spatial reorganization, this link challenges us to look at the micro spatial systems of maquiladoras that make them economically efficient.  Some good graphs, maps and images.  


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Derek Ethier's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 PM
Developed countries outsourcing jobs has become largely beneficial for developing countries. In the case of Mexico, the residents are given new opportunities in manufacturing jobs that they may have never had before. The industrialization of the border area can only lead to increasing development and hopefully a better standard of living for citizens. Unfortunately, it has the exact opposite effect on the U.S., which is giving away jobs.
Joshua Choiniere's comment, September 26, 2012 11:14 AM
This article is displaying the postive and negative side effects that these Maquiladoras have upon the development of stronger economic economies for such countries as Mexico. These buisnesss that invest in the border of Mexico allow these towns/cities to grow and become industrilized. This provides low skill work for the people of Mexico but the logistics of the companies are still being done in the country that has invested in these places. This is good because it lets countries like the United States keep educated/high paying jobs in the States. The negative aspect is that the only jobs the Mexicans recieve are the low paying uneducated type. However still it has postives for both countries and its something we must get used to because its the way of the future.
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China's One-Child Policy

China's One-Child Policy | Carrie's APHG | Scoop.it

"In 1979, the National Population and Family Planning Commission in China enacted an ambitious program that called for strict population control. Families in various urban districts are urged to have only one child—preferably a son—in order to solve the problems related to overpopulation. What has happened since then and what are its implications for the future of China?"  This is an excellent infographic for understanding population dynamics in the world's most populous country. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 11:11 AM
I agree with Don, couldn't have said it better.
Yuanyuan Kelly's curator insight, March 4, 2013 9:27 AM

A really cool infograph regarding China's one child policy!

Brett Sinica's curator insight, November 29, 2013 2:26 PM

This was a cool graphic to explain the basics of the birth policies in China.  As a country, it is respectable for them to try and control their global footprint and growth within the country, yet some of the measures that are taken to achieve or sustain them are slightly questionable.  One of the graphics displayed having one child compared to more than one, which were have the chance of being followed by fines, confiscations of belongings, and even job loss.  In a sense, by having more (a child) they actually get less (money, goods, respect).  The goal of reducing the birth rates had actually worked since it was put in place, though it didn't come without some sort of an expense of the citizens.