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The To Do List 2013 Movie Free HD Download | Watch English Movies Online Free

The To Do List 2013 Movie Free HD Download | Watch English Movies Online Free | Carin | Scoop.it

Watch The To Do List (2013) Full Movie Online Free
Release Date : 26 July 2013 (USA)
Genres : Comedy | Romance
Director : Maggie Carey
Writer : Maggie Carey (screenplay)
Cast : Aubrey Plaza, Johnny Simmons, Bill Hader, Alia Shawkat, Sarah Steele.

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Remember then. 30 minutes. Intermediate to Advanced Levels. Adults.

Remember then. 30 minutes. Intermediate to Advanced Levels. Adults. | Carin | Scoop.it

Mental Imagery in the EFL classroom is always a good idea. During this activity students will be provided with a chance of working with past tenses and improve speaking skills.

 

Procedure:

 

Part 1

 

1 - Show this photo on a computer or show a school photo from the past.

2 - If using this photo, tell students this was taken in a school in Kansas in 1925. Ask them to talk about how it is different from the school they knew as a child, and what they imagine these children's lives were like. In pairs, students share ideas.

3 - Monitor students and then give them some feedback. 

 

PArt 2

 

4 - Tell students to make a list of 4 categories of things they can remember about their childhood. For example, "my favorite toy or game, what they liked to have as a snack at school, a very good friend, my favorite school subject...

5 - In pairs, using their own lists students ask their partners to tell what they remember about each category in the list: " Tell me about your favorite toy."

6  - After both students have remembered about the things on both lists, they discuss the experience briefly.

 

 

Adapted from "Imagine That!"  - Mental Imagery in the EFL classroom - Jane Arnold, Hebert Puchta , Mario Rinvolucri.

 

 


Via Luiz Agrizi
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Guessing game: Detective game | Onestopenglish

Guessing game: Detective game | Onestopenglish | Carin | Scoop.it

Guessing games work wonders if your plan is to make your learners speak! Not only do they help in students' learning process in a fun way, but also trigger critical thinking and develop creative skills. The Detective game is quite challenging especially because it tackles narrative sentences so I would recommend it to upper-intermediate levels. Here, students become detectives and question the teacher about a mystery story. Hope you enjoy it!


Via Luiz Agrizi
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CICINATO CARMO's comment, April 17, 2012 3:47 PM
Guessing games are a fast and straightfoward way of reviewing/practicing language items. There’s one, which I particularly like because it involves the body senses, named “What’ in the bag?”. Honestly, I don’t know if that’s how it's really called but I remember learning it from @Tessa Woodward and I can say that it worked wonders. This activity can be used when teaching modals for speculation/deduction, verbs of senses, (order of the) adjectives and many other exponents. Let me describe its procedures:

1.Select the target (language) item and an object which relates to it somehow.
2.Put the object in a paper/plastic bag. Remember that the bag cannot be transparent.
3.Tell students there is an object in the bag and that they have to guess what it is. (Depending on the aim of the activity, students can (only) ask yes-no questions, wh-questions or make positive/negative statements). Model the kind of language you want students to produce.
4.Students make guesses about the object.
5.After 3 or 4 guesses, choose a student and let him/her touch the bag. Repeat procedure with another student and ask them to comment on their impressions.
6.Have two or three more rounds of guesses.
7.Choose another student and ask him/her to smell it. Do not let the students see what is inside the bag. Repeat procedure with another student and ask them to comment on their impressions.
8.Invite students to say what they know about the object so far.
9.Select two more students and let them look inside the bag. Ask them to generally describe/comment on the object.
10.Ask students to say what the object is and let the ones who’ve seen it confirm/say what it is.

“What’s in the bag?” can be used with all age levels and adapted to different levels of linguistic knowledge. I’ve tried it sometimes and I'm sure that my students had good fun and profited from it a lot.
Luiz Agrizi's comment, April 17, 2012 3:55 PM
Thanks for you collaboration, Cicinato ! ;) I'll make it a new post !
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4-letter words. Warmer. 5 - 10 minutes. Intermediate to advanced levels.

4-letter words. Warmer. 5 - 10 minutes. Intermediate to advanced levels. | Carin | Scoop.it

Procedure:

 

1 - Write a 4-letter word on the board. E.g "LOVE"

2 - Tell students it's the first word of a list.

3 - Tell them they will think of new 4-letter words to continue the list; 

4 - They can only replace 1 letter to form a new word; they can't add or delete any letter.

 

Example: LOVE - LIVE - DIVE - DICE ... 

 

Students play together as a class. You can establish a minimum number of words for a prize; 15 words for instance, so that it's challenging for them. 

 

It's a great opportunity to test your students' range of words and foster a lot of speaking.

 

Have fun!


Via Luiz Agrizi
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