Careers Today
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Careers Today
Information on tips and skills to be better prepared in searching and finding the ideal fit in the today's workforce environment.
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Have Our Attitudes About Sexual Harassment Really Changed?

Have Our Attitudes About Sexual Harassment Really Changed? | Careers Today | Scoop.it
So how much has really changed in the past 35 years? Well, 98% of companies today have anti-sexual harassment policies, and 70% provide some type of training in how to recognize and deal with it. In the 1981 HBR survey, just 29% of companies reported having any formal prohibition against harassment, and only 8% reported having ”manuals, films, and so forth” by way of training. That is progress of a sort, although I’m not sure what sort: A 2016 study found that although (or perhaps because) corporate sexual harassment policies have become more standardized and formulaic, employees often interpret them negatively, and feel that they create a culture of fear instead of a culture of mutual respect.

Moreover, recent statistics show that despite all of the policies and programs, one in three women have experienced harassment, and only 5%–15% of those women complain to their companies. And bystanders often remain silent, whether they are male or female. Even now, when women do lodge formal complaints, firms still have a tendency to retaliate against them, rather than punishing their harassers, unless more women come forward or the cacophony of complaints becomes too much to ignore.

At Fox it took a raft of horror stories before the company moved to address its problem, and even then it seems the company may have been motivated not so much by a desire to be fair to its female employees as by the fierce glare of public shame. Perhaps, then, what’s really changed is not our attitudes about harassment, but rather the brightness and staying power of that spotlight.

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Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance

Device-Free Time Is as Important as Work-Life Balance | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Today, when so much work and leisure time involve staring at screens, I see a different struggle arising: a struggle to find a healthy balance between technology and the physical world, or, for short, “tech/body balance.” A  2016 survey from Deloitte found that Americans collectively check their phones 8 billion times per day. The average for individual Americans was 46 checks per day, including during leisure time—watching TV, spending time with friends, eating dinner.

So attached are we to our devices that it’s not unusual to have your phone with you at all times. We carry our phones around everywhere as if they are epi-pens and we all have fatal allergies. Consider: two weeks ago, as I was beginning a consulting project at a midtown Manhattan corporate office, I found myself making a U-turn on the way to the restroom. I needed to go back to my office to pick up my cellphone, which I had inadvertently left behind. It was an unconscious decision to go back and get it, but my assumption was clear: I needed to take the phone with me to the bathroom. Was I going to make a clandestine call from a bathroom stall? No. Was I dealing with an urgent business matter? Fortunately not. So why did I need my phone with me while I took care of a basic physical need? I didn’t really know. But apparently 90% of use our phones in the bathroom.
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The Trade-Off Every AI Company Will Face

The Trade-Off Every AI Company Will Face | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Machines learn faster with more data, and more data is generated when machines are deployed in the wild. However, bad things can happen in the wild and harm the company brand. Putting products in the wild earlier accelerates learning but risks harming the brand (and perhaps the customer!); putting products in the wild later slows learning but allows for more time to improve the product in-house and protect the brand (and, again, perhaps the customer).

For some products, like Google Inbox, the answer to the trade-off seems clear because the cost of poor performance is low and the benefits from learning from customer usage are high. It makes sense to deploy this type of product in the wild early. For other products, like cars, the answer is less clear. As more companies seek to take advantage of machine learning, this is a trade-off more and more will have to make.
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Incentives Don’t Help People Change, but Peer Pressure Does

Incentives Don’t Help People Change, but Peer Pressure Does | Careers Today | Scoop.it
These findings echo one of the main concerns associated with monetary rewards that sometimes fail to accomplish their goals. Academics refer to this phenomenon as the crowding-out effect of explicit incentives on intrinsic motivation. In other words, associating an economic value with a certain activity changes the nature of the exchange. If health care workers sanitize their hands because it is in the best interest of the patient (and themselves), introducing monetary rewards may change their motivation to a contractual exchange of hand sanitizing for money.
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The Power of Conferences in a Social-Media Age

The Power of Conferences in a Social-Media Age | Careers Today | Scoop.it
In the social-media age, the idea of going to a conference, or gathering for several days of face-to-face meetings, seems almost quaint.

But the truth is the opposite: Social media has made conference-going more valuable than ever. The value of those in-person encounters comes not in spite of, but increasingly because of, the way we use technology and social media—from the colleague we discover on social media (before setting up a date to meet at a coming conference) to the presentation that takes one’s professional reputation to new heights (because it’s amplified on Twitter).

Say you met a great prospect over coffee at a conference. Who is the prospect going to remember in a month: the person he spent 30 minutes with or the person he spent 30 minutes with and with whom he subsequently exchanged half a dozen tweets? Knowing how to make smart use of social media in connection with conferences is the secret to being the person who gets remembered.
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Seven Steps to Reduce Bias in Hiring

Seven Steps to Reduce Bias in Hiring | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Why is it that many of the world’s most advanced companies struggle to create diversified workforces, despite spending hundreds of millions of dollars on diversity training and recruitment?

Implicit bias may be partly to blame, or the idea that even people with the best of intentions toward diversity can harbor attitudes and beliefs that affect their thoughts, feelings and actions outside of their awareness.

These biases stem from our preference for people who are similar to us, provide a feeling of safety, or feel familiar. Indeed, research has shown that men and women alike start to treat minorities differently within milliseconds of seeing them. Our brains automatically carve the world into in-group and out-group members and apply stereotypes within the blink of an eye.

This creates a conundrum for organizations: They want to improve diversity through hiring and promotions, yet doing so requires people to overcome a mental process over which they have little control and that training can’t fix.
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Business-Drone Rules to Take Effect

Business-Drone Rules to Take Effect | Careers Today | Scoop.it
The first detailed U.S. rules for flights of small commercial drones go into effect Monday, including nationwide licensing requirements for pilots and a ban on nighttime operations.
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Get to the Point: 5 Ways You Can Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less

Get to the Point: 5 Ways You Can Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less | Careers Today | Scoop.it
According to author Joe McCormack, we're all drowning. Awash in a sea of information and flooded by constant interruptions, the average consumer doesn't have the time or patience to try and wade through complex or confusing messages. And that's a big problem if you're a small business owner.
How can you cut through the overwhelming noise to make an impact with your customers?

Fortunately, there's a life raft called brevity and McCormack has perfected it. In his book, Brief: Make a Bigger Impact by Saying Less, McCormack argues that we can all become more effective communicators with the proper training.
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What the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement Could Hold for Arizona Manufacturers, Retailers and Distributors: Part 1 – MPEXA

What the Trans Pacific Partnership Agreement Could Hold for Arizona Manufacturers, Retailers and Distributors: Part 1 – MPEXA | Careers Today | Scoop.it
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Almost All Managers Have at Least One Career-Limiting Habit

Almost All Managers Have at Least One Career-Limiting Habit | Careers Today | Scoop.it
The cure: Learning to say “no” is key to becoming more reliable. But this is hard. Here are three tips to make it easier:

Break eye contact. Those of us who are too eager to please get that way by always looking out and never looking in. When in the presence of someone who is pressuring you to make a commitment, slow down the process. Break off eye contact. Take a breath.
Pause the action. If you’re not in the right mental place to weigh the commitment, have a script you can use to delay responding. For example, “I’d really like to help. Let me look at what I’m already signed up to do and get back to you by the end of the day. Will that work?”
Count before you speak. Next, think of all the existing commitments you’ve made.The easiest way to say no is to think of all the other requests you’ve said yes to. Think of saying no not as letting people down but as deliveri
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Job Outlook Brightens for New College Graduates

Job Outlook Brightens for New College Graduates | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Good news for the class of 2016: Companies are planning to step up their hiring of new grads. Employers expect to hire 5.2% more freshly minted grads this year than in 2015.
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Are You Too Stressed to Be Productive? Or Not Stressed Enough?

Are You Too Stressed to Be Productive? Or Not Stressed Enough? | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Find more opportunities to be authentic. Evidence suggests that people often experience feelings of inauthenticity at work. That is, they conform to the opinions of colleagues rather than voicing their own, and they go with others’ flow rather than setting their own agenda. This, my research suggests, has important implications for your stress level and performance. When people behave in inauthentic ways, they experience higher levels of anxiety than when they are simply themselves. So, try to find ways to express who you are at work, such as offering to share your unique talents or decorating your office to reflect who you are.
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Why Is It So Hard for Us to Admit Our Mistakes?

Why Is It So Hard for Us to Admit Our Mistakes? | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Many people are afraid of appearing incompetent in front of our colleagues and bosses. But what we sometimes don’t realize is that it is worse to be viewed as a coward incapable of owning up to mistakes or accepting criticism. Rather than saying, “The plate dropped,” it is good practice to say, “I dropped the plate” — especially if that is exactly what happened. The best executives and investors “drop plates” all the time; without doing so, they would lack experience and a healthy understanding of risk.


Developing a culture where people feel comfortable admitting mistakes needs to start at the top, because employees watch their leaders for clues on acceptable behavior and etiquette. One of the most valuable things that a manager can teach her staff is the ability (no matter how embarrassing) to show fallibility, admit wrongdoing, listen to tough feedback, and persevere through the corrective action toward the next challenge.
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What to Do About Mediocrity on Your Team

What to Do About Mediocrity on Your Team | Careers Today | Scoop.it
1. Show the consequences of mediocrity. Your first job as a leader is to ensure everyone is clear about what they are doing and why they are doing it. Mediocrity is typically evidence of disconnection between someone’s work and the consequences of their mediocrity.
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How to Evaluate, Accept, Reject, or Negotiate a Job Offer

How to Evaluate, Accept, Reject, or Negotiate a Job Offer | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Shift your mindset
First, you must recognize that receiving an offer represents a “new and different phase” of the job search process, says Lees. “The purpose of the interview is to get the offer,” he says. The next stage is about weighing that offer and then negotiating with your new employer. “Pause, you are starting a new chapter.” Bear in mind that even though the job is yours if you want it, you must “continue to be enthusiastic” in your dealings with your prospective manager, says Lees. “By sounding critical or suspicious or by questioning something about the offer, you are sending a negative signal,” he says. “It sounds as if you’re uncertain that you want job.” That may indeed be the case, but it’s not the message you want to send to your would-be manager. “Employers need to feel that you are committed.”

Be methodical
Next, you need to think about what matters to you in both your professional and private life and then “assess the offer” against these metrics, says Weiss. “People tend to focus on the dollars, but it is useful to ask, “What is of value to me?” After all, money is only one component of career satisfaction. “Very often it comes down to, ‘I would rather make X amount of money and be excited to go to work in the morning, than make X plus 10% and hate my job,’” he says. Below are the most important components to take into account as you assess the offer.
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Why the Lowly Dandelion Is a Better Metaphor for Leaders than the Mighty Banyan

Why the Lowly Dandelion Is a Better Metaphor for Leaders than the Mighty Banyan | Careers Today | Scoop.it
In stark contrast to the banyan is a small weed that lives an unremarkable, fleeting life — the dandelion.

From conventional reasoning, you’d be hard pressed to find a management guru who would recommend that we lead like dandelions. But, just as improbable as it sounds, could the small, frail dandelion — a sworn pest of the suburban yard, in fact, offer a better metaphor for modern day leadership?

Further inspection reveals some interesting characteristics that correlate.  Dandelions fall under a class known as beneficial weeds, which help the plants around them. Dandelions do this by sending taproots deep into the ground. These taproots pull nutrients up to the surface, improving the quality of the soil and feeding shallow-rooted plants nearby. Dandelions also attract insects that enable pollination, like bees, which help other flowering plants. Plants that might not otherwise have a chance to germinate or survive get a shot at life because of the nutrients and insects that dandelions send their way. Yes, dandelions are prolific and fight for territory, but they don’t grow large and they fade quickly after blooming, giving other species a chance to thrive. They may not be the showiest plants, but they leave the environment a better place.
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How Movies Can Help Robots and People Get Along

That’s the finding of a recent study that had 56 undergraduate students rate their feelings toward humanlike service robots. Half of the group watched the science-fiction movie “Robot and Frank,” which involved a robot, and the other half watched “Safety Not Guaranteed,” a sci-fi romantic comedy that didn’t involve robots, before they made their decision.

The result: Those who viewed the movie with the robot were more likely to say that they would buy humanoid robots that assist the elderly. The researchers chose helper robots because they are becoming a common way to assist seniors and people with disabilities, but the same results could easily apply to the workplace, says Martina Mara, head of the robopsychology research division at Ars Electronica Futurelab, a multidisciplinary research center in Linz, Austria, and one of four researchers of the study.
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The 3 Simple Rules of Managing Top Talent

The 3 Simple Rules of Managing Top Talent | Careers Today | Scoop.it
The general view in business is that top-end talent is highly sensitive to and motivated by compensation and that big monetary rewards are key to their management. There is a grain of truth to this — but only a grain. In my 36-year career, I haven’t met a single person truly at the top end of the talent distribution who is highly motivated by compensation. Not one.

Sure, I’ve met lots of successful people who are highly motivated by compensation: CEOs who pump up the perceived value of their company to sell it, hedge fund managers who destroy companies for short-term gain, investment bankers who get their clients to acquire companies they shouldn’t to earn big fees, consultants who sell their clients work that they don’t need, and me-first athletes who poison their teams.

But none are the kind of top-end talent who make their organization great for a sustained period.
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Colleges, Faced With Funding Cuts, Target Tenure Trims

Colleges, Faced With Funding Cuts, Target Tenure Trims | Careers Today | Scoop.it
For decades, tenured professors held some of the most prestigious and secure jobs in the U.S. Now, their status is under attack at public and private colleges alike.

In states facing budget pressures such as Missouri, North Dakota and Iowa, Republican lawmakers have introduced bills for the current legislative sessions to eliminate tenure, cut back its protections or create added hoops that tenured faculty at public colleges must jump through to keep their jobs. University administrators, struggling to shave their costs, are trying to limit the ranks of tenured professors or make it easier to fire them.

The institution of tenure—which provides job security and perks like regular sabbaticals—began in the U.S. early in the 20th century as a bulwark against interference from administrators, corporate interests and politicians who might not like professors’ opinions or agree with their research.
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HoloLens: Microsoft Opens Doors to Holographic Computing

HoloLens: Microsoft Opens Doors to Holographic Computing | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Microsoft is widening the net for businesses wanting to use holographic computing to transform how they operate, by selling them Hololens Development Editions for $3,000. Mark Kelly reports. Image:
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U.S. Job Growth Rebound Calms Fears of Economic Swoon

U.S. Job Growth Rebound Calms Fears of Economic Swoon | Careers Today | Scoop.it
A powerful rebound in hiring last month eased fears about an economic downturn as the U.S. expansion enters its eighth year, putting the nation on solid footing to absorb global shocks and market turbulence.
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3 Reasons Why Talent Management Isn’t Working Anymore

3 Reasons Why Talent Management Isn’t Working Anymore | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Some of the most storied “talent factories” in the world — companies like Exxon, General Electric, Goldman Sachs — say that they focus on the best people, but what they really mean is that they focus on people who thrive in their context, and in their social system.  All of these companies have a distinct “type” that they look for –which brings its own risks.  Becoming a talent factory isn’t about hiring or promoting the best people, it is about understanding the DNA of your social system, and building from that baseline.
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Outsmart Your Next Angry Outburst

Outsmart Your Next Angry Outburst | Careers Today | Scoop.it
Being a skillful communicator takes thoughtfulness. So much of our communication has become transactional — a word here, a sentence there — that we forget communication, at its essence, is relational.

It sounds simple, but in reality there is nothing simple about communicating, especially when emotions are involved. I — and you, I am sure — see this kind of clumsy communication all the time. At one point or other we’ve all been Howard and we’ve all been Robert. Situations like this should encourage us to step back and commit to a clear, straightforward, easy-to-follow framework for communicating powerfully in any situation.
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How to Get into a Rhythm at Work If You Can’t Stick to a Schedule

How to Get into a Rhythm at Work If You Can’t Stick to a Schedule | Careers Today | Scoop.it
— a standard routine, maybe it’s time to stop thinking about managing your time as developing a set of strict rules to follow, and start thinking about increasing productivity as a process of finding and cultivating your unique creative rhythm — your life cadence, your beat. A way of being where there’s a central theme and recognizable melody, but also room for improvisation and blending in harmonies.
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How to Not Fight with Your Spouse When You Get Home from Work

How to Not Fight with Your Spouse When You Get Home from Work | Careers Today | Scoop.it
“Every relationship is a cross-cultural experience,” according to John Gottman, an eminent psychologist at the University of Washington whose research has focused on marriage and committed relationships. In Principia Amoris: The New Science of Love, Gottman writes, even “if we come from the same country, the same part of the country, the same race, and the same religion, we come from… families that have defined meaning in very different ways. When we build a relationship together, we must decide on our own meanings.”
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