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Career-Life Development
Exploring the links between career development, technology and lifelong learning
Curated by Paul Rawlinson
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QuadBlogging Connects Student Writers with Global Audiences

QuadBlogging Connects Student Writers with Global Audiences | Career-Life Development | Scoop.it
A blog without an audience is like...a library without books, a car without an engine, Beyonce without a ring.

 

The idea is deceptively simple. Four teachers agree to have their students comment on each other's blogs in an organized fashion. Each week, one of the four gets a turn as the spotlight class. The other three classes visit and leave comments. Over the course of a month, every student's work gets read and commented upon. Along the way, students learn about respectful online communication. They may decide to revise their thinking if a commenter shares a perspective they haven't considered.

 

Read more, very interesting:

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/quad-blogging-technology-classroom-suzie-boss

 


Via Gust MEES
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Rescooped by Paul Rawlinson from Curate your Learning
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Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus

Curation vs. Blogging: The Difference Is In The Focus | Career-Life Development | Scoop.it

Robin Good: If curation is all about finding and sharing great content, what's the difference with what so many bloggers have been doing until now?

The difference, according to Deanna Dahlsad at Kitsch-Slapped, is in the focus. While bloggers often cover just about anything that intercepts their online wanderings, curators are characterized by a strong focus on a specific topic.  

 

Here is a key passage from her article: "Many bloggers spend their time selecting what they consider the best of what other people have created on the web and post it at their own sites, just like a magazine or newspaper.

 

Or they provide a mix of this along with writing or otherwise creating their own content. Not to split hairs, but curation involves less creation and more searching and sifting; curation’s more a matter of focused filtering than it is writing.

 

Because content curation is expected to be based on such focused filtering, it begins far more based on topic selection.

 

This is much different from blogging, where bloggers are often advised to “just begin” and let their voice and interests accumulate over time to eventually reveal a primary theme.

 

...

 

Some collectors just collect what they like as they stumble into it. …Sometimes, collectors just keep piling up stuff, no matter what it is. Even if this isn’t hoarding, it’s not-so-much of a purposeful pursuit.

 

But professional curators, those who manage collections for museums or other organizations, and serious collectors, they maintain a specific focus.

 

And rather than stumbling into items, they continually seek for specific items.

 

The definition dictates the curation — and everything from funding to their continued employment is based on how well their collection meets the collection’s definition.

 

While blogging success may be thought of in many different ways, the success of content curation lies in how well you define, search/research, and stick to your subject."

 

Rightful. 8/10

 

Full article: http://www.kitsch-slapped.com/2012/06/facts-questions-on-blogging-curating-collecting/ ;


Via Robin Good, Barbara Bray
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Robin Good's comment, June 19, 2012 4:21 PM
Thank you Deanna for writing it!
AnneMarie Cunningham's curator insight, March 14, 2013 2:13 PM

another explanation of curation

Everett Hudson's comment, March 22, 2013 10:50 AM
you have great ideas. more please!
Rescooped by Paul Rawlinson from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
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Content Curation: How To Cite, Credit and Attribute Other People's Content on the Web

Content Curation: How To Cite, Credit and Attribute Other People's Content on the Web | Career-Life Development | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Here is a good guide providing the basic principles that should be followed when using, reposting, citing or quoting other people's content (both text and images).

 

The article outlines "proper methods of source attribution on the internet to guarantee the right people get credit for their hard work and ideas."

 

Specific sections of the article cover:

How To Cite Content in Blog Posts How To Cite Content in Social Media How to Give Credit to Guest Bloggers and Ghost Writers How to Cite Images and Visual Content

 

 

Well done. 8/10


Read more: http://blog.hubspot.com/blog/tabid/6307/bid/33098/How-Not-to-Steal-People-s-Content-on-the-Web.aspx

 

 

 


Via Robin Good, Ken Morrison, Lynnette Van Dyke
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El código Gutenberg's comment, August 18, 2012 2:01 PM
Thank you very much. You're very kind. I hope that readers like my work in "El código Gutenberg". And thank you for the information in your page.
nickcarman's curator insight, February 17, 2013 5:45 PM

This is an excellent article, which lays out the groundrules for using, or citing someone else's content.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:32 AM

A Good Resource