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Google’s Neural Network for Language Translation Narrows Gap Between Machines & Humans

Google’s Neural Network for Language Translation Narrows Gap Between Machines & Humans | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
Of course, machine translation is still far from perfect. Despite its advances, GNMT can still mistranslate, particularly when it encounters proper names or rare words, which prompt the system to, again, translate individual words instead of looking at them within the context of the whole. Clearly, there is still a gap between human and machine translations, but with GNMT, it is getting smaller.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, October 13, 4:56 AM

A good thing for those in the language learning industry to keep up with.

EI Design's curator insight, October 17, 6:31 AM
Google’s Neural Network for Language Translation Narrows Gap Between Machines & Humans
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After 100 Years, Ramanujan Gap Filled

After 100 Years, Ramanujan Gap Filled | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

Who was Ramanujan?

 

A century ago, Srinivasa Ramanujan and G. H. Hardy started a famous correspondence about mathematics so amazing that Hardy described it as “scarcely possible to believe.” On May 1, 1913, Ramanujan was given a permanent position at the University of Cambridge. Five years and a day later, he became a Fellow of the Royal Society, then the most prestigious scientific group in the world. In 1919 Ramanujan was deathly ill while on a long ride back to India, from February 27 to March 13 on the steamship Nagoya. All he had was a pen and pad of paper (no Mathematica at that time), and he wanted to write down his equations before he died. He claimed to have solutions for a particular function, but only had time to write down a few before moving on to other areas of mathematics. He wrote the following incomplete equation with 14 others, only 3 of them solved.

 

Within months, he passed away, probably from hepatic amoebiasis. His final notebook was sent by the University of Madras to G. H. Hardy, who in turn gave it to mathematician G. N. Watson. When Watson died in 1965, the college chancellor found the notebook in his office while looking through papers scheduled to be incinerated. George Andrews rediscovered the notebook in 1976, and it was finally published in 1987. Bruce Berndt and Andrews wrote about Ramanujan’s Lost Notebook in a series of books (Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3). Berndt said, “The discovery of this ‘Lost Notebook’ caused roughly as much stir in the mathematical world as the discovery of Beethoven’s tenth symphony would cause in the musical world.”

 

In his book analyzing Ramanujan’s results, Berndt investigates the existence of a solution for many of Ramanujan's equations. Now we know, sometimes a solution exists as elegant as other values found by Ramanujan himself.


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New findings and research methods leading to elucidation of fertilization mechanism

New findings and research methods leading to elucidation of fertilization mechanism | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

Fertilization is a critical process for starting new life and begins with the fusion between sperm and egg. In the steps of sperm-egg fusion, IZUMO1 on the spermatozoon and the IZUMO1 counter-receptor on the egg, JUNO, play crucial roles in the very first step, the formation of an intercellular bridge (Fig. 1), and deletion of either gene leads to the failure of gamete membrane fusion. However, the molecular mechanism by which JUNO specifically recognizes IZUMO and participates in the sperm-egg adhesion step remains to be fully understood.

A research group led by Kazuki Kato, then-graduate student, Hiroshi Nishimasu, assistant professor, and Osamu Nureki, professor, at the Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, and Yuhkoh Satouh, assistant professor, and Masahito Ikawa, professor, at the Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, has analyzed the detailed structure and function of the JUNO protein. This group crystallized the mouse JUNO protein and, as a result of X-ray crystal structure analysis, determined the crystal structure of JUNO by molecular replacement at 2.3Å resolution. They also found that JUNO and folate receptors have similar overall structures, but JUNO lacks the folate-binding pocket, thereby explaining the inability of JUNO to bind folate.


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Microsoft, Google and Facebook compete on AI development

Microsoft, Google and Facebook compete on AI development | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

No matter where the future goes, Microsoft will have a place in it. The company’s "conversation as a platform" offering, which it unveiled in March, represents a bet that chat-based interfaces will overtake apps as our primary way of using the internet: for finding information, for shopping, and for accessing a range of services. And apps will become smarter thanks to "cognitive APIs," made available by Microsoft, that let them understand faces, emotions, and other information contained in photos and videos.

 

Microsoft argues that it has the best "brain," built on nearly two decades of advancements in machine learning and natural language processing, for delivering a future powered by artificial intelligence. It has a head start in building bots that resonate with users emotionally, thanks to an early experiment in China.

 

And among the giants, Microsoft was first to release a true platform for text-based chat interfaces — a point of pride at a company that was mostly sidelined during the rise of smartphones.

 

After losing the mobile battle, can Microsoft win the AI battle? In January 2016, The Verge described the tech industry's search for the killer bot. In the months that followed, companies big and small have accelerated their development efforts. Facebook opened up a bot development platform of its own, running on its popular Messenger chat app. Google announced a new intelligent assistant running inside Allo, a forthcoming messenger app, and Home, its Amazon Echo competitor. Meanwhile the Echo, whose voice-based inputs have captivated developers, is reportedly in 3 million homes, and has added 1,200 "skills" through its API.

 

Microsoft is proud of its work on AI, and eager to convey the sense that this time around, it's poised to win.


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Sangeeta's curator insight, July 15, 11:24 AM
The company’s "conversation as a platform" offering, which it unveiled in March, represents a bet that chat-based interfaces will overtake apps as our primary way of using the internet: for finding information, for shopping, and for accessing a range of services. And apps will become smarter thanks to "cognitive APIs," made available by Microsoft, that let them understand faces, emotions, and other information contained in photos and videos.

Microsoft argues that it has the best "brain," built on nearly two decades of advancements in machine learning and natural language processing, for delivering a future powered by artificial intelligence. It has a head start in building bots that resonate with users emotionally, thanks to an early experiment in China.

And among the giants, Microsoft was first to release a true platform for text-based chat interfaces — a point of pride at a company that was mostly sidelined during the rise of smartphones.

After losing the mobile battle, can Microsoft win the AI battle? In January

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Pathway to ultra-resolution microscopy: Microscopy taps power of programmable DNA

Pathway to ultra-resolution microscopy: Microscopy taps power of programmable DNA | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

Proteins mostly do not work in isolation but rather make up larger complexes like the molecular machines that enable cells to communicate with each other, move cargo around in their interiors or replicate their DNA. Our ability to observe and track each individual protein within these machines is crucial to our ultimate understanding of these processes. Yet, the advent of super-resolution microscopy that has allowed researchers to start visualizing closely positioned molecules or molecular complexes with 10-20 nanometer resolution is not powerful enough to distinguish individual molecular features within those densely packed complexes.

 

A team at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering led by Core Faculty member Peng Yin, Ph.D., has, for the first time, been able to tell apart features distanced only 5 nanometers from each other in a densely packed, single molecular structure and to achieve the so far highest resolution in optical microscopy. Reported on July 4 in a study in Nature Nanotechnology, the technology, also called "discrete molecular imaging" (DMI), enhances the team’s DNA nanotechnology-powered super-resolution microscopy platform with an integrated set of new imaging methods.

 

DNA-PAINT technologies, developed by Yin and his team are based on the transient binding of two complementary short DNA strands, one being attached to the molecular target that the researchers aim to visualize and the other attached to a fluorescent dye. Repeated cycles of binding and unbinding create a very defined blinking behavior of the dye at the target site, which is highly programmable by the choice of DNA strands and has now been further exploited by the team’s current work to achieve ultra-high resolution imaging.

 

"By further harnessing key aspects underlying the blinking conditions in our DNA-PAINT-based technologies and developing a novel method that compensates for tiny but extremely disruptive movements of the microscope stage that carries the samples, we managed to additionally boost the potential beyond what has been possible so far in super-resolution microscopy," said Mingjie Dai, who is the study’s first author and a Graduate Student working with Yin.


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What’s Next for Artificial Intelligence

What’s Next for Artificial Intelligence | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
The best minds in the business—Yann LeCun of Facebook, Luke Nosek of the Founders Fund, Nick Bostrom of Oxford University and Andrew Ng of Baidu—on what life will look like in the age of the machines
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Physicists have discovered what looks like an entire family of new particles in the LHC

Physicists have discovered what looks like an entire family of new particles in the LHC | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
They can’t be explained by our existing laws of physics.

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Particle zoo in a quantum computer

Particle zoo in a quantum computer | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
Physicists in Innsbruck have realized the first quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories, building a bridge between high-energy theory and atomic physics. In the journal Nature, Rainer Blatt's and Peter Zoller's research teams describe how they simulated the creation of elementary particle pairs out of the vacuum by using a quantum computer.

 

Elementary particles are the fundamental buildings blocks of matter, and their properties are described by the Standard Model of particle physics. The discovery of the Higgs boson at the CERN in 2012 constitutes a further step towards the confirmation of the Standard Model. However, many aspects of this theory are still not understood because their complexity makes it hard to investigate them with classical computers. Quantum computers may provide a way to overcome this obstacle as they can simulate certain aspects of elementary particle physics in a well-controlled quantum system.

 

Physicists from the University of Innsbruck and the Institute for Quantum Optics and Quantum Information (IQOQI) at the Austrian Academy of Sciences have now done exactly that: In an international first, Rainer Blatt's and Peter Zoller's research teams have simulated lattice gauge theories in a quantum computer. They describe their work in the journal Nature.

Simulation of particle-antiparticle pairs using a quantum computer

 

Gauge theories describe the interaction between elementary particles, such as quarks and gluons, and they are the basis for our understanding of fundamental processes. "Dynamical processes, for example, the collision of elementary particles or the spontaneous creation of particle-antiparticle pairs, are extremely difficult to investigate," explains Christine Muschik, theoretical physicist at the IQOQI. "However, scientists quickly reach a limit when processing numerical calculations on classical computers. For this reason, it has been proposed to simulate these processes by using a programmable quantum system." In recent years, many interesting concepts have been proposed, but until now it was impossible to realize them. "We have now developed a new concept that allows us to simulate the spontaneous creation of electron-positron pairs out of the vacuum by using a quantum computer," says Muschik.

 

The quantum system consists of four electromagnetically trapped calcium ions that are controlled by laser pulses. "Each pair of ions represent a pair of a particle and an antiparticle," explains experimental physicist Esteban A. Martinez. "We use laser pulses to simulate the electromagnetic field in a vacuum. Then we are able to observe how particle pairs are created by quantum fluctuations from the energy of this field. By looking at the ion's fluorescence, we see whether particles and antiparticles were created. We are able to modify the parameters of the quantum system, which allows us to observe and study the dynamic process of pair creation."


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Chinese supercomputer tops list of world's fastest computers

Chinese supercomputer tops list of world's fastest computers | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
A Chinese supercomputer has topped a list of the world's fastest computers again this year, and for the first time the winning system uses Chinese-designed processors instead of U.S. technology.

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What’s Next for Artificial Intelligence

What’s Next for Artificial Intelligence | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
The best minds in the business—Yann LeCun of Facebook, Luke Nosek of the Founders Fund, Nick Bostrom of Oxford University and Andrew Ng of Baidu—on what life will look like in the age of the machines
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First teleoperated endolumenal robot from secretive startup Auris cleared for use by FDA

First teleoperated endolumenal robot from secretive startup Auris cleared for use by FDA | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

Teleoperated endolumenal bot can navigate inside the body, image and treat conditions without making incisions.

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has just approved the first medical robot from Auris Surgical, a stealthy startup led by the co-founder of industry leader Intuitive Surgical, makers of the widely-used da Vinci robot.

 

The teleoperated ARES robot (the acronym stands for Auris Robotic Endoscopy System), was cleared by the FDA at the end of May, and could now be used for diagnosing and treating patients.

 

Auris, which describes itself only as a “technology company based in Silicon Valley,” was previously thought to be working on a robotic microsurgical system designed to remove cataracts, and the company has in fact filed several patent applications along those lines.

 

However, an investigation by IEEE Spectrum suggests that the company has greater ambitions, including, according to current and former employees, “building the next generation of surgical robots… capable of expanding the applicability of robotics to a broad spectrum of medical procedures.”

 

A close reading of recent patent applications filed by Auris scientists shows that the company is focusing on so-called endolumenal (or endoluminal) surgery. This involves surgeons introducing flexible robots via the body’s natural openings (the mouth in particular), to address conditions of the throat, lungs and gastrointestinal system. IEEE Spectrum can reveal that Auris has already carried out at least one successful human trial of such a robot, outside the United States.

 

Because endolumenal surgery does not involve large incisions or (usually) general anesthesia, it benefits fragile patients who cannot withstand the trauma of normal surgery. The Society for American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons estimates that effective endolumenal therapies for obesity and reflux diseases alone could help more than 1 million patients a year in the United States.


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10 Neurotechnologies About to Transform Brain Enhancement and Brain Health

10 Neurotechnologies About to Transform Brain Enhancement and Brain Health | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

We recently examined the worldwide landscape of Pervasive Neurotechnology patents, given that investment in intellectual property is a crucial signal in the life-cycle of technology commercialization. We paid extra attention to neurotech­nolo­gies which, being dig­i­tal, are scal­able and rel­a­tively inex­pen­sive, and that, being non-invasive, pose few if any neg­a­tive side-effects.


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Daniel Perez-Marcos's curator insight, June 4, 6:39 AM
Where is the neurotechnology field going? This overview by SharpBrains gives you some hints.
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SIGNIFICANCE OF ISCHEMIA-MODIFIED ALBUMIN AS A SIMPLE MEASUR... : RETINA

SIGNIFICANCE OF ISCHEMIA-MODIFIED ALBUMIN AS A SIMPLE MEASUR... : RETINA | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
Purpose: Oxidative stress (OXS) plays critical role in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DRP)
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New kind of substances inhibits viruses and bacteria

New kind of substances inhibits viruses and bacteria | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

A new class of substances is effective against both the AIDS pathogen, HIV, and antibiotics-resistant MRSA bacteria. These two pathogensoften occur together. Scientists hope that it may be possible to control them with a single drug in the future. Scientists of the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland (HIPS) developed so-called dual agents that inhibit the growth of both types of pathogens. They describe their findings in the renowned Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. The HIPS is the Saarbrücken branch of the Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research (HZI), which has its headquarters in Braunschweig. It was founded jointly by the HZI and Saarland University in 2009.

 

The human immunodeficiency virus HIV is one of the most dangerous and widespreadpathogens throughout the world. Some 37 million people are host to the virus and 1.2 million were killed by this disease in 2014 alone. Meanwhile, both the proliferation of the pathogen and the progression of the disease can be halted through a combination therapy, but the viruses show an increasing trend to develop resistance and no longer respond to the medications used against them.

 

The notorious MRSA bacteria, i.e. methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, show similar persistence as many common antibiotics have become ineffective. HIV patients, whose immune systemhas already been weakened by the disease, are often additionally afflicted by MRSA pathogens. These co-infections are very problematic and difficult to treat. "Resistance to the common therapies is quite widespread amongst both the viruses and the MRSA bacteria, which means that the co-infection is very difficult to control," explains HZI scientist Prof Rolf Hartmann, who is the head of the "Drug Design and Optimization" department at the HIPS. "In addition, it is necessary to carefully consider the interactions between the medications given to the patients."


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Smart grids, blockchain and self-organising systems

Smart grids, blockchain and self-organising systems | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
In his blog post on the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution,’ Reidel stated [1] that “The true wonder of the fourth industrial revolution won’t be the data produced; it will be intelligent machines’ capacity to analyze those data and communicate their findings within a network of similarly intelligent machines. Then, each connected machine will act, altering its processes to be more efficient and communicating those changes back to its network”. In this process of preparing and executing information transactions between distributed operating machines, Reidel sees a role for the blockchain. In his view, the blockchain can inspire mutual trust between the machines involved in the information transactions and their stakeholders.

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Critical Limb Ischemia: National Snapshot of Its Management Holds a Few Surprises - Consult QD

Critical Limb Ischemia: National Snapshot of Its Management Holds a Few Surprises - Consult QD | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
Rates of surgery for CLI are going down as rates of endovascular procedures surge. Meanwhile hospital admissions for CLI are holding constant. So reports a huge new nationwide analysis of CLI care.
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Blood of world’s oldest woman hints at [current!] limits of life

Blood of world’s oldest woman hints at [current!] limits of life | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
She lived to 115, but a study of Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper's blood hints at factors limiting lifespan

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Google combines two main quantum computing ideas in one computer

Google combines two main quantum computing ideas in one computer | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

A team of researchers from Google, the University of the Basque Country, the University of California and IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science has devised a means for combining the two leading ideas for creating a quantum computer in one machine, offering a possible means for learning more about how to create a true quantum computer sometime in the future. They have published the details in the journal Nature.

 

Computer scientists would really like to figure out how to build a true quantum computer—doing so would allow for solving problems that are simply unsolvable on conventional machines. But, unfortunately, the idea behind such a computer is still mostly theoretical. To move some of the ideas from theory to reality, the researchers with this new effort have built an actual machine that is based on two of the strongest approaches to building a quantum computer.

 

The first approach is based on the gate model, where qubits are linked together to form primitive circuits that together form quantum logic gates. In such an arrangement, each logic gate is capable of performing one specific type of operation. Thus, to make use of such a computer, each of the logic gates must be programmed ahead of time to carry out certain tasks.

 

With the second approach the qubits do not interact, instead they are kept at a ground state where they are then caused to evolve into a system capable of solving a particular problem. The result is known as an adiabatic machine—some have actually been built because they are more versatile than the gate model computers. Unfortunately, they are also not expected to be able to ever fully make use of the full power of quantum computing.

 

In this new effort, the researchers have attempted to gain the positive attributes of both approaches by creating a machine where they started with a standard quantum computer and then used it to simulate an adiabatic machine. It uses 9 qubits and has over 1,000 logic gates and allows for communication between qubits to be turned on and off at will. The end result, the team reports, is one that unlike an adiabatic machine, is able to tackle traditionally difficult computing problems. They expect it to be useful as a research tool, helping lead the way to the development of a truly quantum computer.


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RIGHTS FOR ROBOTS: EU reveals plans for new class of AI electro-person

RIGHTS FOR ROBOTS: EU reveals plans for new class of AI electro-person | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
Ahead of today's historic "in/out" vote for Britain, it has emerged the EU wants to introduce laws specific to robots that could give them civil rights regulations of they own, and see limits on how many jobs they could replace from humans.

In scenes that could have come from the sic-fi novels of Isaac Asimov nearly 70 years ago, a recommendation of the European Parliament to the EU Commission has suggested in the future sentient AI robots could need their own rights and responsibilities, and strict laws banning them from taking over too many jobs across the Continent may become necessary.

In the 1950s Asimov predicted robots would eventually have to adhere to laws, because the potential of what could develop from a combination of sophisticated mechanism, androids with human features, and artificial intelligence (AI) was too dangerous.

But, it appears Brussels bureaucrats fear this fiction will become a reality and the report has even considered including a "new robot category next to natural and lawful people: the electronic person".

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Google Has A List Of The A.I. Behaviors That Would Scare It Most

Google Has A List Of The A.I. Behaviors That Would Scare It Most | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
And may scare you too

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Driverless Cars Will Face Moral Dilemmas

Driverless Cars Will Face Moral Dilemmas | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
Autonomous vehicles may put people in life-or-death situations. Will the outcomes be decided by ethics or data?

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Wearable Artificial Kidney Completes First Clinical Trial, Could Free People From Dialysis

Wearable Artificial Kidney Completes First Clinical Trial, Could Free People From Dialysis | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
Positive results from the first clinical trial on a wearable artificial kidney may soon replace dialysis.

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20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities

20,000+ FREE Online Science and Technology Lectures from Top Universities | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

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Siegfried Holle's curator insight, July 4, 2014 8:45 AM

Your knowledge is your strength and power 

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Acceso gratuito a documentos de las mejores universidades del mundo

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WoW  .. Expand  your mind!! It has room to grow!!! 

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6 ways virtual reality is transforming healthcare

6 ways virtual reality is transforming healthcare | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it
This week a groundbreaking study showed the potential of VR as a treatment for paranoia, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg

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Daniel Perez-Marcos's curator insight, May 15, 12:33 AM
Cognitive and motor rehabilitation, training of professionals, telehealth, fobias,...

Virtual reality is one of the most versatile means to enhance current interventions and conceive new ones.
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All scientific papers to be free by 2020 under EU proposals

All scientific papers to be free by 2020 under EU proposals | Cardiovascular and vascular imaging | Scoop.it

All publicly funded scientific papers published in Europe could be made free to access by 2020, under a “life-changing” reform ordered by the European Union’s science chief, Carlos Moedas. The Competitiveness Council, a gathering of ministers of science, innovation, trade and industry, agreed on the target following a two-day meeting in Brussels last week.

 

The move means publications of the results of research supported by public and public-private funds would be freely available to and reusable by anyone. It could affect the paid-for subscription model used by many scientific journals, and undermine the common practice of releasing reports under embargo.

 

At present the results of some publicly funded research are not accessible to people outside universities and similar institutions without one-off payments, which means that many teachers, doctors, entrepreneurs and others do not have access to the latest scientific insights. In the UK, funding bodies generally require that researchers publish under open access terms, with open access publishing fees paid from the researcher’s grant.

 

The council said this data must be made accessible unless there were well-founded reasons for not doing so, such as intellectual property rights or security or privacy issues.

The changes are part of a broader set of recommendations in support of Open Science, a concept that also includes improved storage of and access to research data, Science magazine reports.

 

Open Science has been heavily lobbied for by the Dutch government, which currently holds the presidency of the Council of the EU, as well as by Moedas, the European commissioner for research and innovation. Moedas told a press conference: “We probably don’t realize it yet, but what the Dutch presidency has achieved is unique and huge. The commission is totally committed to help move this forward.”


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AcademicLabs's curator insight, June 1, 3:00 AM

Finally, all research publications free fo charge for the general public. Huge breakthrough! How will this impact:
- the publishing industry? Will the combined revenue sources of the article processing fees payed by researchers and the extra, advanced digital services make up for the losses?
- industry who has a new huge reservoir of knowledge freely available?
- research communication? With a potentially larger audience and thus impact, will publications include extra sections to explain the findings and background in 'human' language? Should each of them include an infographic to facilitate disseminiation and uptake of the findings?
- academics transitioning to industry? Will they be knowledge consultants, analyzing relevant literature and proposing an action plan as a service for industry?
- ...
Exciting times! Looking forward to participate in this knowledge ecosystem with AcademicLabs!