Captivated Audience
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Captivated Audience
Hooking students' interest with relevant content, authentic situations, and meaningful skills
Curated by Todd Reimer
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Blue-Eyed Humans Have A Single, Common Ancestor

Blue-Eyed Humans Have A Single, Common Ancestor | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"New research shows that people with blue eyes have a single, common ancestor. A team at the University of Copenhagen have tracked down a genetic mutation which took place 6-10,000 years ago and is the cause of the eye colour of all blue-eyed humans alive on the planet today."

 
 
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Macro Photos Of Snowflakes Show Impossibly Perfect Designs

Macro Photos Of Snowflakes Show Impossibly Perfect Designs | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"One of the true wonders of the world are snowflakes, tiny designs made of ice that are so individually unique, so detailed, and so spectacular it's hard to comprehend that they happen naturally and aren't pulled from the depths of our own imaginations. Photographer Alexey Kljatov has a special talent for capturing the brief life of these beautiful ice creations. He features many of his snowflake photos on Flickr. Kljatov says, "I capture snowflakes at open balcony of my house, mostly on glass surface, lighted by LED flashlight from opposite side of glass, and sometimes in natural light, using dark woolen fabrics as background."

 

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Embracing Uncertainty and Risk: Scientists Break Down Plastics

Embracing Uncertainty and Risk: Scientists  Break Down Plastics | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
Once it's created, plastic (almost) never dies. While in 12th grade Miranda Wang and Jeanny Yao went in search of a new bacteria to biodegrade plastic -- specifically by breaking down phthalates, a harmful plasticizer. They found an answer surprisingly close to home.
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Hexagons! And Other Reasons To Love Math

Hexagons! And Other Reasons To Love Math | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"Eduardo Sáenz de Cabezón suspects that when people ask him what’s the use of math, they’re really asking a more pointed question. “They’re asking you, ‘Why did I have to study that bullshit I never used in my life again?’” he says. Sáenz de Cabezón (TED Talk: Math is forever) sympathizes, but as a mathematics professor at the University of La Rioja in northeastern Spain, he has come up with a spirited defense of his chosen profession. Math, he believes, is nothing less than a quest for eternal truth."

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Organist Cameron Carpenter: 'An Object Of Pure Mathematics'

Organist Cameron Carpenter: 'An Object Of Pure Mathematics' | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

Cameron Carpenter plays the organ in a way you'll rarely hear in church. He travels with his instrument on a huge truck, and it takes a small team to set it up in concert halls around the world. A virtuoso composer and performer who plays everything from Bach to pop, not to mention the first organist ever to be Grammy-nominated or a solo album, Carpenter says his connection to the instrument goes back even further than his interest in music. "I found the instrument visually compelling. I was home-schooled growing up in Pennsylvania; I was never in church. I rather treasure that aspect of my view on the organ because I've been able to see it for the secular and theatrical instrument that it is," he says. "The irascibility of the organ is such that, in order to be able to do anything at all with it, you have to have an incredible — I would say it's somehow beyond dedication. It amounts to a kind of obsession, at least for me, with this machine that attracts me as much as an object of pure mathematics as a musical instrument. It is one of the few things that is both." | via NPR

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Psychological Tricks To Get People To Do Whatever You Want

Psychological Tricks To Get People To Do Whatever You Want | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
Have you ever left a shop, a chat with a friend or a meeting at work and felt like you’ve somehow been duped? It's possible you might have been swayed or swindled by some subtle psychological impressions you weren’t consciously aware of.   This infographic, created by Business Insider, shows you some simple psychological tricks to help you avoid these pitfalls and even mold minds youself.
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This Short Animation Changes Your Perspective On Time

This Short Animation Changes Your Perspective On Time | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
The length of time Earth has been around can be truly mind-boggling (let’s not even get into the universe’s scale of time). To help fathom the immense age of Earth and the comparatively meagre time span of human history, Business Insider has created this video.
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What We Owe the MythBusters

What We Owe the MythBusters | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"When the reality TV show “MythBusters” debuted on the Discovery Channel in 2003, its producers weren’t on a mission to transform science and education in America. They just wanted to entertain. In each episode, the hosts would try to debunk or confirm a few classic urban legends. Could a penny dropped off the Empire State Building really kill a person? Could eating a poppy-seed bagel actually make you test positive for heroin? The producers cast two San Francisco-based special-effects artists, Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage, as hosts. The show was a surprise hit — pulling in as many as 20 million viewers a season — and it helped changed our culture."

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Crazy Things People Do In The Name Of Science

Crazy Things People Do In The Name Of Science | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"You might think that strapping yourself to a weather balloon, soaring to a height of 135,000 feet … and then jumping, sounds like a pretty nutty idea. And you would be right. Yet that’s exactly what Google’s Alan Eustace did in 2014. And here’s the thing — this wasn’t just a stunt. Sure, he may have broken both the sound barrier and the previous records for high-altitude jumps, but Eustace was soaring and jumping in the name of science."

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How Languages Evolved

How Languages Evolved | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
Bonjour! Namastē! Hyālō! However you say “hello,” it might surprise you to learn that over 400 Indo-European languages may have come from one single language spoken mainly in ancient Anatolia, which is now modern-day Turkey. Indo-European languages are a specific language group of over 400 languages, including Spanish, German, Hindi, Portuguese and Urdu.
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Science Finally Explains Slackers

Science Finally Explains Slackers | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
There’s a neurological reason for apathy and laziness, according to new research. Inefficient connections between certain areas of the brain may make it harder for some people to decide to act.
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Scientists Turn Algae Into Cancer-Killing Delivery System

Scientists Turn Algae Into Cancer-Killing Delivery System | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
Each month, fresh research appears to reveal a new way of delivering chemotherapy drugs to tumors; just this week, scientists announced that they could use a sort of “ultrasonic screwdriver” to non-invasively open up the blood-brain barrier in order to get drugs inside the brain.
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Take This Test To See How You Perceive Color

Take This Test To See How You Perceive Color | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
Perception is a fickle thing. As good as our senses are at keeping us alive, they can often mislead and deceive us. Here’s a great example of that which you can try at home, featured in the new BBC Four series, Colour: The Spectrum of Science. Check out the video below, follow the instructions and see a black and white image turn into a full-color image of a landscape.
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DJ's Attach Heart Monitors To Fans And Analyze Their Results

DJ's Attach Heart Monitors To Fans And Analyze Their Results | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"In electronic music, the beat is everything. As an artist, your goal during a set is simple: take the crowd on a roller-coaster ride of emotions. How do you do this? There are countless mechanical elements, of course, things like the pace of songs and the tension and tempo, but the paramount thing is reading the crowd with as much focus as you can. You need to intuit what they’re feeling and thinking, read what hits and what flops, and then fine-tune along the way and in future sets. The execution was simple: we’d ask a few of our fans to wear heart rate monitors to our sold out show at Vulcan Gas Company in Austin. We’d record the set, capture all the data from the heart rate monitors, and we’d overlay the rhythm patterns on the progression of the recorded set. We played in a purposefully smaller venue that night, so we knew it would be prime to really go off."

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Amazing Image Reveals How Dolphins See The World

Amazing Image Reveals How Dolphins See The World | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
In a world first, scientists have been able to capture how dolphins use sound waves to create a perception of the world around them.  To record the echolocation signals, scientists from Miami and the United Kingdom used a technique called CymaScope, an imaging process which is able to imprint sonic vibrations of water.
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"Hidden Portrait" Discovered Underneath The Mona Lisa

"Hidden Portrait" Discovered Underneath The Mona Lisa | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"The Mona Lisa is one of the most famous pieces of artwork in human history. This half-length portrait by the Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci, thought to depict Lisa Gherardini in the early 16th century, was given to the King of France centuries ago, and has been on permanent display at the Louvre Museum in Paris since 1797. Now, 500 years on from its completion, French scientist Pascal Cotte, has claimed to have uncovered hidden details within the painting." | via IFL Science

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The Most Important Image Captured By Hubble

The Most Important Image Captured By Hubble | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"In 1996, scientists took a huge risk when they pointed the Hubble telescope to an inky field that they believed to be void of stars and planets. As images from Hubble are in constant demand, the worry was that devoting so much time to a black space would prove futile. Once the photons finally registered, though, that leap of faith proved fruitful: light from over three thousand galaxies illuminated the image. A few years and missions later, Hubble’s glimpse into what is known as the deep field has revealed that we are just one tiny part of a vast system comprising 100 billion galaxies."

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Here's How Much The Death Star Would Have Cost

Here's How Much The Death Star Would Have Cost | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"The destruction of both Death Stars by The Rebel Alliance in Star Wars is generally celebrated as a great success (despite the war seemingly continuing on in "The Force Awakens"), but according to a researcher, Professor Zachary Feinstein of Washington University in St. Louis, destroying them would have been catastrophic for the galactic economy and the rebel chances to establish a second republic. You might dismiss this paper as a waste of time, but many Bothans died to bring us this information. According to the U.S. government, the first Death Star cost $852 quadrillion (thousand million million), 11,000 times the gross world product, which is estimated to be about $77 trillion dollars. But this latest paper, available on ArXiv, estimates that the total cost of building two Death Stars in "A New Hope" and "Return of the Jedi" was $419 quintillion (billion billion) dollars when research and development are also factored in."

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Corporate Money Has Affected Our View Of Climate Change

Corporate Money Has Affected Our View Of Climate Change | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
Climate change has long been a polarizing subject, with a gulf between those who “believe” in it and those who are “deniers” widening and becoming more intense in recent years. Some argue that this is because the science isn’t proven, or that there are doubts in the data, but a new study claims to have found the real reason that this rift exists: corporate funding.
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Your School Shapes How You Think About Inequality

Your School Shapes How You Think About Inequality | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"Ask yourself this question: Were you aware of inequality growing up? Your answer may depend in part on where you went to high school. Students at racially diverse schools, particularly black and Hispanic students, are more tuned in to injustice than students going to school mostly with kids that look like them. That's one of the main threads of a new book by Carla Shedd, an assistant professor of sociology and African-American studies at Columbia University. In Unequal City: Race, Schools, and Perceptions of Injustice, Shedd goes straight to the source: the students at four Chicago public high schools. She even let the kids pick their own pseudonyms." | via NPR

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Charo's curator insight, November 19, 2015 8:09 AM

añada su visión ...

Charo's curator insight, November 19, 2015 8:09 AM

añada su visión ...

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8 Living Artists Every Educator Should Know

8 Living Artists Every Educator Should Know | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it
By staying aware of artists who are working today, educators can invigorate their lives and their classrooms with new and expansive ways of looking at contemporary life and the world.
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The Surprising (and Backward) Evolution of Swear Words

The Surprising (and Backward) Evolution of Swear Words | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"We tend to think of the evolution of swear words as linear, from bad to “meh.” A word that was extremely offensive — unspeakable, even — in your grandparents’ generation is now a staple of basic cable TV. But is it possible for words to actually become more offensive and taboo over time? Absolutely, says linguist Randall Eggert from the University of Utah, who recently wrote a terrific editorial in the Washington Post titled, How the n-word became the new f-word. In your grandparents’ generation, only the most depraved pornographers and poets used the f-word, but sadly most people could utter the n-word without impunity. In modern America, the two words have officially switched spots on the offensiveness scale."

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Civic Technology Brings Power To The People

Civic Technology Brings Power To The People | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"People have long had a complicated relationship with their governments — a tension that often is exacerbated by government policies and processes that cannot keep pace with today’s on-demand culture. It doesn’t have to be like this. The techcommunity — especially those working in civictech — know this to be true. From enabling crowdfunding campaigns to revamping entire cities’ tech infrastructure, civic tech empowers people to turn challenges and frustrations with government into opportunities for a new business, a new career or a new voice."

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Is Your Red The Same As My Red?

Is Your Red The Same As My Red? | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"It’s a question that everyone has pondered at one time or another: does everyone view colors in the same way? Of course, there are people with color blindness and other disorders that do skew their perception of color. But among the rest of us with normal color vision, can we ever be sure we’re seeing exactly the same thing?"

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Memories Can Be Passed Down Through Changes In Our DNA

Memories Can Be Passed Down Through Changes In Our DNA | Captivated Audience | Scoop.it

"Epigenetics is a branch of biology which studies how the development and functioning of biological systems are influenced by forces that operate outside of the DNA sequence. Within the past few years alone, remarkable discoveries have been made which  demonstrate that our thoughts, emotions, feelings, and overall perception of the world/environment around us can actually have  physical/biological effects on our DNA."

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