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Donald Clark Plan B: Blog marathon: 50 blogs on learning theorists over next 50 days

Donald Clark Plan B: Blog marathon: 50 blogs on learning theorists over next 50 days | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Oh my, what a gift to our Master's candidates! Our program did not hit on all the theorists on this list, nor even a majority of them. What a wonderful way to backfill some of your knowledge in a concise and reflective way. Be sure to read the comments as well as people advocate for theorists not on the list. Such as Friere and his connection to social learning. This is an important part of the "talking the talk" performance, aka "connecting theory to practice."

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Instructional Design + Technology
Examining the best practices and trends of how technology helps people learn
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Learning to Learn | HR Examiner with John Sumser

Learning to Learn | HR Examiner with John Sumser | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Jay Cross writes: "In a knowledge era, it is irresponsible to disregard the prime means of creating, sharing, and replenishing intellectual capital. Informal learning is effective because it is personal. The individual calls the shots. The learner is responsible. It’s real. It’s self-service. It is the only thing that will work with the digital natives who are now entering the workforce. In the past, learning focused on what was in the in-dividual’s head. The individual took the test, got the degree, or earned the certificate. The new learning focuses on what it takes to do the job right. That includes the business environment, work flow, colleagues, partners, and customers."

 

Cross has written a manifesto of informal learning as something to formally examine in a corporation. Or rather, the corporation as a knowledge community and informal learning as personalized learning. This is the first place I've seen the term "free-range learning." I like the term--it evokes the independence we strive for in our own home with our own children and our efforts to raise "free-range kids."

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Curation: A Core Competency for Learning Professionals

Curation: A Core Competency for Learning Professionals | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

A nice, succinct description of curantion competency. I  really like how he breaks down the levels of curation:

"There are multiple layers to curation, each of which has benefits when applied to learning and performance:

· Aggregation: Gathering and sharing relevant content. It releases the individual worker from needing to seek out the content.

· Filtering: Instead of simply aggregating content, filtering shares only those resources that are most relevant and valuable.

· Elevation: Recognizing a larger trend in the sea of seemingly less important content.

· Mashups: Merging two or more unrelated pieces of content to form a new message.

· Timelines: Organizing random pieces of content in chronological order to show the evolution of an idea."

 

The author is right that there still is a human need in this act of knowledge management.  As one commentator added, "For me, curation is meaningless unless some value is added by the curator. That takes some time and effort..."

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Building 21st Century Writers -- THE Journal

Building 21st Century Writers -- THE Journal | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it
Student achievement scores take off with the implementation of tech-supported writing initiatives that cross curriculum lines. Rosie, I read this and thought of your project. Even though the My Access! Platform starts with 3rd grade writing I thought you might want to read more about some of the research cited in this article and visit the websites mentioned in the comments.
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Rosie S. Delacruz's comment, March 15, 2012 2:34 PM
Thanks, Stacie/Denise, for finding and sharing this with me. I'm dashing off to meet with a teacher right now, but I will read this after my meeting with our 8th grade ELA teacher. I'm discovering that people need to learn how to collaborate, which isn't practiced as often as it could be. I'll share out that article, too, since it has to do with personal learning communities.
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Using Twitter as a Professional Development Tool

Using Twitter as a Professional Development Tool | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Generative points about using Twitter to access your PLN (as well as the importance of having one). Now that we are several weeks in the semester, who is in your PLN now?

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Stacie Cassat Green's comment, March 22, 2012 9:32 AM
I just realized the article I just scooped about curation being a core competency for learning professionals is the same author of this Twitter article you scooped earlier this week.

There is that sharing one brain thing happening again...:)
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Mar 12 Feature From Traditional Instruction to Instructional Design 2.0 - Free - ASTD

Mar 12 Feature From Traditional Instruction to Instructional Design 2.0 - Free - ASTD | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

A very basic discussion of what instructional design using Web 2.0 technology means. Again, like pre-Web 2.0, it is about the learning, not the tool! What do you want students/learners to understand? To make it seem fresh and new, the author calls it Instructional Design 2.0.

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Social Networking on the Brain (11/1/11)

Social Networking on the Brain: Neuroscience and the New Media Adam Gazzaley, Associate Professor of Neurology, Physiology and Psychiatry and Director, Neuro...

 

Recommendation for a panel discussion from Vera.

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It Is Not About the Gadgets - Why Every Teacher Should Have to Integrate Tech Into Their Classroom

It Is Not About the Gadgets - Why Every Teacher Should Have to Integrate Tech Into Their Classroom | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

How one teacher regards "technology integration." Be sure to read the comments: one person aptly points out that technology integration is often discussed as a necessity for "student engagement," implying that technology tools are devices for entertaining students. What does technology integration mean to you?

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dy/dan » Blog Archive » On iBooks 2 And iBooks Author

dy/dan » Blog Archive » On iBooks 2 And iBooks Author | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Dan Meyer is known as being a very innovative math teacher. He recently blogged about his experience using McGraw Hill's Algebra I ibook and has found that it isn't that innovative. It offers what one of my favorite professors, George Brackett, calls "chrome" but it isn't doing anything to change the way math instruction is delivered. Again, it highlights the importance that PEDAGOGY must undergrid the design of any technology tool for education. The sole benefit of ibooks cannot be that they are lighter than print books.

 

He writes:

The textbook is now digital but students still encounter it as they always have: wisdom to be received, perhaps highlighted, annotated, and memorized, but not created, constructed, or made sense of. Teachers still interact with students as they always have. The platform doesn't offer them any new insights into the ways their students think about mathematics. As far as I can tell, the iBook doesn't establish any new link between the student and teacher, or strengthen any old ones.

What I'm saying, basically, is that I'd have to modify, adapt, and extend the McGraw-Hill iBook in all the same ways that I modified, adapted, and extended the McGraw-Hill print textbook. We'd pull out the iBook just as infrequently as its printed sibling."

 

It does seem that rethinking how we teach and learn keeps getting put on the back burner.

 

 

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o0JLC0o's comment, February 19, 2012 5:43 PM
When I think of significant shifts in education such as the digitization of text books, a few things come to mind: novelty, adoption, and ultimately, use.

Most schools—and therefore most students—are not going to have access to digital textbooks anytime soon. Those schools that do—the early adopters—will have difficulty with students trying to balance the novelty of the technology and the meaningful content there in.

Can you imagine being a student at a school that pilots a program where you get an iPad to yourself with all of your textbooks? It would probably be very cool, but will you learn more? Learn quicker? Learn better? And once all physical textbooks are history and everyone is using digital textbooks or websites, are the students going to be getting any "new" information or experiences?

Ultimately, it comes down to the relationship between the content, the teacher, and the student (just like the graphic in this scoop). The information in the digital textbooks are insignificantly different for the time being. Educational technologies is not so much about the technology—at least not using it as a crutch or novelty. I agree with many of the commenters in the scooped blog...once GOOD teachers are allowed the ability to create their own digital textbooks without too much corporate regulation, technology can be better utilized to share and spread knowledge from teacher to student.
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‘Flipped classroom’ teaching model gains an online community | KurzweilAI

‘Flipped classroom’ teaching model gains an online community | KurzweilAI | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

The flipped classroom model has had some success in K-12 classrooms, as well. I've heard about it working well in math classes. Video lectures are watched before class. Class time is spent doing the homework together. What can you take away from the flipped classroom model?

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Hanging Out Playing Pechaflickr ~ Stephen's Web

Hanging Out Playing Pechaflickr ~ Stephen's Web | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

I laughed when I first read about "Pechaflickr", given most of our students experience with Pecha Kucha from EDUCE102 and/or EDUCE599. The idea is to go to http://pechaflickr.cogdogblog.com/ and try to "make sense of 20 random flickr photos, each one on screen for 20 seconds" and "make it fun" by doing it over Google Hangouts.  I really like the idea Stephen Dowes makes here about possibly leveraging the tool for online language instruction.

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Stacie Cassat Green's comment, February 8, 2012 10:03 PM
We HAVE to try this! Maybe we could have an EdTech alumni drink Pechaflickr night on Google Hangout.
Stacie Cassat Green's comment, February 8, 2012 10:04 PM
We HAVE to try this! Alumni night anyone?
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How to Create Your Own Textbook — With or Without Apple | MindShift

How to Create Your Own Textbook — With or Without Apple | MindShift | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Nancy, I am not sure how much  you've been exploring the Open Education movement, but nowadays, I almost never hear a conversation about the creation of eBooks without including this parallel discussion. If you haven't already added this topic to your research, I'd encourage you to do so.

 

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PB Writing: Teaching as We Learn Together | Powerful Learning Practice

PB Writing: Teaching as We Learn Together | Powerful Learning Practice | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Jesse, the structure of her Starship activity might be something you can draw from.

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Obama Administration's Challenge To Schools: Embrace Digital Textbooks Within 5 Years

Obama Administration's Challenge To Schools: Embrace Digital Textbooks Within 5 Years | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

In the textbook development and adoption world, five years is not that long. In the world of every changing technology, five years is a long time. Nancy, I'm glad you are keeping us focused on this topic this semester. Very timely!

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Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work?

Amidst a Mobile Revolution in Schools, Will Old Teaching Tactics Work? | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

"But unless traditional teaching practices morph to adapt and fully take advantage of what mobile devices can afford, some fear the promise will go the way of all the technology collecting dust in the corner of the classroom. Worse, it might eventually lead to what everyone unequivocally dreads: the mechanization of teaching.“I’m petrified that we’ll apply new technology to old pedagogy,” Soloway said. “Right now, the iPad craze is using the same content on a different device. Schools must change the pedagogy.”

 

Precisely! Over the past 18 years, the time I've spent in the educational technology field, each emerging technology has the same story. It can change the way we teach and learn! It will revolutionize education! And then the same people again say, "we have to change our pedagogy. Seriously. We really have to change the pedagogy."

 

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Donald Clark Plan B: Blog marathon: 50 blogs on learning theorists over next 50 days

Donald Clark Plan B: Blog marathon: 50 blogs on learning theorists over next 50 days | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Oh my, what a gift to our Master's candidates! Our program did not hit on all the theorists on this list, nor even a majority of them. What a wonderful way to backfill some of your knowledge in a concise and reflective way. Be sure to read the comments as well as people advocate for theorists not on the list. Such as Friere and his connection to social learning. This is an important part of the "talking the talk" performance, aka "connecting theory to practice."

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75 Interesting Ways to use an iPad in the Classroom

Intesting ideas for using iPads in the classroom complete with use case scenarios.

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MOOCs, Large Courses Open to All, Topple Campus Walls

MOOCs, Large Courses Open to All, Topple Campus Walls | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

"Massive Open Online Courses are free, non-degree programs that have been drawing top professors and are seen as a tool for democratizing higher education."

 

Recently, I tweeted to Jason about researching MOOCs within the context of social learning. I have been intriguted by the concept and even have colleagues here at ESC who launched a MOOC this year. You can check that course out here:

http://www.cdlprojects.com/cmc11blog/

 

I have been thinking a lot about designing PLEs and the concept of a MOOC for both formal and informal learning environments. The student is clearly in the center of this design and is right in line with what Stacie and I have been conceptualizing and doing for years in our courses. It would be interesting to see what a MOOC for our Exploring Educational Technologies course would be like...

 

 

 

 

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The Facebook Eye

The Facebook Eye | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Like photography before it, social media changes the way we perceive the world...

 

This article was suggested by Vera and I like the term, "Facebook Eye." Do you ever find yourself mentally composing a Facebook posting, even when you aren't at a computer? Or, as the author confessed, have you taken a picture of your beautiful meal before you've even taken a bite? This will have to become part of a standard media literacy curriculum. Soon.

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How Simon Sinek Uses Technology To Connect With Others | MeaganVisser.com

How Simon Sinek Uses Technology To Connect With Others | MeaganVisser.com | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Simon Sinek is the author of the book, Start with Why. This is the book I mentioned in Monday's class that talks about the importance of "why" instead of "what." In this interview, a blogger talked to him about his use of technology. He discusses Twitter and how he uses it to keep track of his "little ideas" throughout the day. This echoes our discussion on Monday--how long do these tweets hang around? Can we use our tweets as an archive of our small thoughts? Can we then look through these small thoughts to build our story, look for patterns, and make meaning?

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Who should be your Chief Collaboration Officer? | Learning in the Social Workplace

Who should be your Chief Collaboration Officer? | Learning in the Social Workplace | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Jane Hart is one of the people in my PLN--I read her blog and follow her Twitter feeds about social learning. In this blog, she talks about the need for a "Chief Collaboration Officer" in organizations. Yes, absolutely. She asks, "Who would be your CCO?" I wonder, how long will it take for organizations to value collaboration? It is a skill/habit of mind that is valued in K-12 education. Engineering departments at colleges have been among the first in higher ed to embrace collaboration because they understand how important it is for the practice of engineering after school. But what about organizations and even higher ed administration. What will it take for them to get there?

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Connectivism, Elgg by Ishmael Burdeau on Prezi

Connectivism, social learning and Elgg....

Stacie is quoted in this presentation about our vision and use of Elgg in EDUCE102 and EDUCE599.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Denise (Grey) Snyder
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Stacie Cassat Green's comment, February 18, 2012 7:45 AM
Interesting to see more people interested in this intersection of connectivism, social learning, and alternatives to an LMS/how technology can be supported in this learning environment.
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15 Ways That Pinterest Is For Bloggers

15 Ways That Pinterest Is For Bloggers | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

"Pinterest is the cool new social network. Although it’s been around for several months, suddenly bloggers can’t get enough."  I've been seeing a lot of chatter about Pinterest and after reading this article I decided it was time to check it out. I just got my invite so I will post my thoughts about where it might be useful within formal/informal education soon.

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elearnspace › Losing interest in social media: there is no there there

Here is the G. Siemens blog post from July 2011 I was talking about in class. I've been thinking about what he's said, as well as the comments people made, all week. In the post, he offers that some social media hype is overstated (e.g., a hashtag is the equivalent of a social movement). He argues that "social media is about flow not substance". Some people blasted him for these statements in the comment section, saying that what he was claiming was in the face of his own theory of connectivism. He replied there was  "no contradiction at all. Social networks do not equal social media. Connected specialization involves bringing together different information sources or people with different levels of expertise. I replied to Clive Shepherd’s blog addressing this in a bit more detail. Again, as stated in other comments, social media has a role to play. There is nothing in what I wrote in this post that contradicts assertions I and others have made about connectivism. For that matter, the first article I did in 2004 on connectivism was a few years prior to the current “social media” hype. You don’t need Twitter or Facebook to connect with others. That said, tools like Twitter/Facebook can be useful, but don’t mistake the tool as being the point of value, when it’s the connection it enables that is most critical."

 

I've been thinking a lot about how much I agree with him on this point.

 

He claimed earlier in the post, "Social media=emotions.

Blogging/writing/transparent scholarship=intellect. Put another way, Twitter/Facebook/G+ are secondary media. They are a means to connect in crisis situations and to quickly disseminate rapidly evolving information. They are also great for staying connected with others on similar interests (Stanley Cup, Olympics). Social media is good for event-based activities. But terrible when people try to make it do more – such as, for example, nonsensically proclaiming that a hashtag is a movement. The substance needs to exist somewhere else (an academic profile, journal articles, blogs, online courses)." 

 

I understand where he is going with his argument and agree there are probably more people that use social media in the way he describes than those that do not. However, I did see an improvement in our EDUCE102 students reflections when we had them use Twitter to "mindcast" about things they were reading and thinking about. We had several students tell us at the end of the course how much they really feel in love with using Twitter as a result of this "new" way of using Twitter–they continue to "mindcast" instead of "lifecasting" on Twitter to this day. While I can agree, some of the value of social media might be overstated I am not sure I agree that social media tools like Twitter, FB, G+ are all simply about flow.

 

What do you think?

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Jason Alvarez's comment, February 10, 2012 11:00 PM


I agree with George Siemens in that the social networks like FB, Twitter & G+ as they exist today are predominately about flow. They are not the repositories of knowledge, but rather the circulatory system by which information flows into endpoints such as individuals or learning communities that end up assimilating and building knowledge.

I also agree that it's not quite that simple. Although FB, Twitter, G+, LinkedIn and Delicious are the "links" of the network itself, each of the endpoints (such as each of us) define and adapt our "links" in the networks by using these tools and they are often defined by the flows and quality of information. Finally, the hash tags are ways in which data is being categorized, which ultimately assists in the assimilation of data for creating knowledge. In George's defense, however, it does appear boil down to flow from a connectivism standpoint despite any advantages mindcasting might offer to improve student reflections.
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10 Open Education Resources You May Not Know About (But Should) | MindShift

10 Open Education Resources You May Not Know About (But Should) | MindShift | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

If "curation" is the word for 2011, and now "2012," then you have to add "open" as well.

 

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This Chart Shows That Information Overload At Work Is Literally Hurting Our Brains

This Chart Shows That Information Overload At Work Is Literally Hurting Our Brains | Instructional Design + Technology | Scoop.it

Weinberger offers that we don't have information overload, we have filter failure. Filters are both technical (emerging) and a literacy. This chart provides a graphical look at coping strategies. Who are you?

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