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Rescooped by Tambre Leighn from brain tumor survivors
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Courage through cancer: Ready for the next big thing

Courage through cancer: Ready for the next big thing | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Eric Galvez admits his life is much different now. (RT @PacificCove: #BrainTumorThursday - Courage through cancer: Ready for the next big thing #BrainCancer...

Via Beth A. Williams
Tambre Leighn's insight:

"We can go through it, or we can GROW through it" ~ Tambre Leighn  Eric is a living embodiment of my quote about how we choose to approach challenges and change in our lives.  What an inspiring story!

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Beth A. Williams's curator insight, April 6, 5:48 PM

Eric Galvez, significantly impaired since his bout with a brain tumor, remains as upbeat as ever, and has invested his life in helping others through a non-profit organization that provides in formation and support, as well as public speaking. Living life on his terms. So inspiring to the rest of us.

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Caregivers have negative health behaviors

Caregivers have negative health behaviors | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
The estimated 6 million informal caregivers in California show serious psychological distress and negative health behaviors such as smoking, researchers say.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Caregivers often put their self-care to the side as noted in this article.  Because we understand how important self-care is for caregivers, the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society of Kansas City and I joined together to create a FREE telecall to get caregivers some much needed coaching on reducing stress, increasing their energy and finding resources to help and support them as they care for their loved one.


Email jennifer.jones@lls.org to register & for dial in details.


As a certified professional coach specializing in coaching cancer survivors and caregivers, I'll be focusing on practical tools to address caregiver stress/burnout, support your wellbeing, address challenges and discover how asking for help is a gift to others. All caregivers are welcome to join this call! 


Email jennifer.jones@lls.org to register & for dial in details today! Call is on April 8th at 430pm PST/730pm EST.

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This video will make your Saturday.

This video will make your Saturday. | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

A group of women with alopecia experience being adorned with henna crowns for the first time. The women were also treated to professional make-up and photography sessions. The whole project came together thanks to a team of volunteers.

Tambre Leighn's insight:

Read more about how this group helps cancer survivors in my blog interview, "Walking Works of Art," 

http://wellbeyondordinary.com/walking-works-of-art/

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New JCO Study Finds High Rates of Financial Decline among Survivors of Breast Cancer, with Minorities Feeling the Brunt

New JCO Study Finds High Rates of Financial Decline among Survivors of Breast Cancer, with Minorities Feeling the Brunt | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil, knows that the cancer care community has made great strides in the way it thinks about survivorship.

   Reshma Jagsi, MD, DPhil

“As oncologists, we’re very proud of the fact that we’re doing so well in our ability to cure a higher proportion of breast cancer patients. In turn, there’s more attention to survivorship issues and ensuring that what we’re doing doesn’t cause long-term harm to our patients that we’re not intending.”

One of those unintended consequences—the long-term financial burden experienced by many survivors of breast cancer—is the focus of Dr. Jagsi’s recent study, “The Long-Term Financial Burden of Breast Cancer: Experiences of a Diverse Cohort of Survivors Identified Through Population-Based Registries,”  published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO) online ahead of print (March 24, 2014). The study found that among a sample of 1,502 survivors, 33% reported a decline in financial status since diagnosis, with minority patients experiencing a disproportionate amount of the burden.

Jagsi and her colleagues—composed of a cross-disciplinary group of researchers—focused on several specific measures of “financial decline,” including: patients’ perception of whether they were worse off financially since diagnosis and whether this was due to the breast cancer, total out-of-pocket expenses and how these were financed, and amount of debt due to medical expenses. The research team also assessed changes in employment status and the degree to which patients experienced financial “privation,” defined as going without medication, missing a doctor’s appointment or mammogram, going without health insurance, having utilities turned off, or having to move out of one’s home because of medical expenses.

The study found that among the 33% of respondents who reported a decline in financial status since diagnosis, 77% felt this was partly due to the breast cancer. Factors that put survivors at significantly increased odds of experiencing financial decline attributed to breast cancer were: being Spanish-speaking Latina (SS-Latina), age under 65, household income of under $50,000, part-time work at diagnosis, reduced work hours after diagnosis, lack of substantial prescription drug coverage, breast cancer recurrence, and undergoing chemotherapy.

In addition, 12% of respondents reported having medical debt four years post-diagnosis, with significant differences among racial/ethnic groups: while 9% of whites and 10% of SS-Latinas reported medical debt, that number rose to 15% among blacks and 17% among English-speaking Latinas (ES-Latina). The four racial/ethnic groups in the study were defined as: ES-Latina, SS-Latina, non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks.

One of the most concerning statistics was connected to the variable of privation—18% of the respondents, and a significantly higher percentage of blacks and ES-Latinas, reported experiencing at least one privation.

“Eleven percent of our black participants had had their utilities turned off because they couldn’t pay their bills and four percent of all of our respondents told us they had to move out of their homes because of their medical expenses,” said Dr. Jagsi. “Those are really disturbing and important experiences to know about and the kinds of things that the literature to date has really not had sufficient information about.” 


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Finally!  Finally, some of the real life challenges cancer survivors experience are starting to get much needed attention.  With an ever-increasing number of survivors (thankfully), resources to support them with non-medical impacts of cancer need to grow.  Many of these, such as financial, have a significant impact on quality of life.

 

Kudos to Dr. Jagsi for recognizing that the whole person and their whole life is involved.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 25, 6:07 PM

This is a very important study showing the long term financial burden that happens as a result of a breast cancer diagnosis. A disturbing trend is especially seen with Latinas and the most difficult for African-American women. It is heartbreaking to read this: “Eleven percent of our black participants had had their utilities turned off because they couldn’t pay their bills and four percent of all of our respondents told us they had to move out of their homes because of their medical expenses,” said Dr. Jagsi. “Those are really disturbing and important experiences to know about and the kinds of things that the literature to date has really not had sufficient information about.” To see the study referred to in this article go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2014/03/18/JCO.2013.53.0956.abstract


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Black-white disparities widening in U.S. breast cancer deaths

Black-white disparities widening in U.S. breast cancer deaths | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"In the largest cities in the U.S., death rates from breast cancer have dropped across the board over 20 years, but far less so for black women than whites, according to a new analysis.

The widening survival gap is likely due to differences in the quality of healthcare and access to it, researchers contend, because health factors alone cannot explain the changes over two decades.

"The advancements in screening tools and treatment which occurred in the 1990's were largely available to White women, while Black women, who were more likely to be uninsured, did not gain equal access to these life-saving technologies," lead author Bijou Hunt, an epidemiologist at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago, told Reuters Health in an email.

Past research has examined racial differences in survival for specific cancers and for cancer in general and found at least some could be explained by biology. High blood pressure, diabetes and other health problems that both worsen cancer outcomes and are more common among blacks have received some of the blame.

Black women are also more likely than whites to have aggressive breast tumors that don't respond to the most effective treatments. This basic difference in cancer genetics is another reason given for differing survival when it comes to breast cancer.

To assess changes in survival trends on a national level, Hunt and her colleagues looked at mortality rates in the largest U.S. cities at four different time points: 1990-1994, 1995-1999, 2000-2004 and 2005-2009.

They found that during the 20-year span, deaths from breast cancer fell overall - by 13 percent for black women and by 27 percent for white women. While a gap was already present in the early 1990s, it widened considerably with time."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Cancer doesn't discriminate....neither should screenings, treatment or care.  Time to close the gap!

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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 24, 1:11 PM

It is clear that the widening survival gap has a lot to do with access to health care. Hunt told Reuters Heath, "If genetics were responsible . . . we would not have seen the rates go from being nearly equal in most places at the first time point to being so much worse for Black women than for White women at the last time point.

Increased screening and treatment options among whites, coupled with both a lack of access to and lower quality of screening and treatment among blacks appear to be the more important culprits. 

To see the study with in depth analysis of the increasing black-white disparities in breast cancer mortality in the 50 largest cities in the US published in Cancer Epidemiology go to: http://www.avonfoundation.org/assets/bcds/2014-bc-disparities-study.pdf


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Give & Take

Give & Take | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Scrolling through my newsfeed a few nights ago, I came upon two posts, one on top of the other that captured a thing I know to be true about cancer…it gives and it takes. Here's a story of Hope and serendipity to remind us that it is our choice in how we spend our days...in every moment.

Tambre Leighn's insight:

I'm very grateful that cancer survivor, Hope Schaberg, allowed me to share part of her personal story and for the "magic" of the universe that brought the lives of two amazing women together in one virtual moment.

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Backing Off Exercise Worsens COPD

Backing Off Exercise Worsens COPD | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Slowing down in exercise habits was associated with a subsequent increase in hospitalizations for exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a prospective Spanish study showed.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Staggering evidence continues to build re: the power of physical activity to generate healthy outcomes.  If your healthcare organization is struggling with engaging patients in healthy lifestyle choices, I invite you to contact me to discover how coaching is the missing piece - check out www.iPECwellbeing.com for more information.

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Fox News Producer on Her Battle With Rare Type of Breast Cancer

Fox News Producer on Her Battle With Rare Type of Breast Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"Fox News Associate Producer Annie Goodman spoke with Neil Cavuto yesterday about her ongoing fight against Triple Negative Breast Cancer.

The 10-year Fox News veteran, who’s produced for “Forbes on Fox” and “Your World with Neil Cavuto,” has been battling the rare form of breast cancer for two years, with it also spreading to her ovaries, lungs, and brain.

“I’m doing OK…feeling good this week,” Goodman said during her week off from chemotherapy. On Monday, she wrote a piece on her fight with cancer for Foxnews.com, and yesterday morning she helped ring the New York Stock Exchange opening bell along with the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation.

“It’s not easy to say out loud that I have stage four breast cancer, and I’m only 32 years old,” Goodman told Cavuto. Even though her cancer was caught early, she went through 16 rounds of chemotherapy, 25 rounds of radiation, a double mastectomy, and a hysterectomy.

After the triple negative breast cancer spread to her ovaries, Goodman started feeling off and confused, with loss of vision. She later learned she had six brain tumors. Today, doctors tell Annie her condition is treatable, with her latest surgery removing three brain tumors, followed by brain radiation and an upcoming round of chemotherapy.

“The hardest part of dealing with this is planning ahead…quite honestly, I’d love to make plans to do something in December, but quite honestly, I don’t know if I’m going to be alive.”


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Here's courage, front and center.  Annie Goodman bravely shares her story to elevate awareness about Triple Negative Breast Cancer.  Thank you, Annie, for being a voice amongst the growing number of those challenged with TNBC who are educating us about the unique needs and asking for the support and services they deserve!

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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 10, 5:36 PM

Annie Goodman, 32, 10 year Fox News veteran news spoke with Neil Cavuto about her experience living with metastatic triple negative breast cancer.  March 3, 2014 was Triple Negative Breast cancer Day and Annie Goodman was at the NY Stock Exchange ringing the bell for the Triple Negative Breast Cancer Foundation. She explained that triple negative is rare and about 20% of all breast cancer cases are triple negative. Triple Negative does not have many of the targeted treatments that hormone positive and Her2 positive cancers have, so it is much more difficult to treat.It is more common in young women and African American women and tends to recur early. Two years ago, Annie originally had stage IIB breast cancer but it spread to her ovary, lungs, and brain. She had brain surgery, chemotherapy, whole brain radiation and her doctors are telling her everything is treatable. She said the hardest part is planning ahead especially because she has to do so much treatment and this cancer is very aggressive. She also speaks truthfully about not knowing how long she will be alive.The interview is very informative and well worthy listening to the whole piece. Even during all this treatment Annie is a great advocate, making sure that people are aware of triple negative breast cancer disease. We have got to get more successful treatments that can help with this very aggressive breast cancer.

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Using Open Innovation to Deliver High-End Healthcare Disruption | Innovation Insights | Wired.com

Using Open Innovation to Deliver High-End Healthcare Disruption | Innovation Insights | Wired.com | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"So how do we begin to break through the barriers that exist in healthcare to create an environment where truly disruptive innovation is possible? One option is to fling open the doors of the R&D department, figuratively speaking, and invite anyone — doctor, nurse, healthcare administrator, even patient and caregiver — to participate in product creation. Common sense suggests that any person living with a healthcare challenge or any healthcare worker tasked with patient care is ideally situated to identify problems and opportunities that exist within their current environment of care. It stands to reason that these same people might already have solutions in mind for how to improve the situation, but perhaps lack the knowledge, resources, or time necessary to bring their ideas to life. In the consumer world, we talk about new inventions fulfilling unmet consumer needs, but in the medical world, no important need is ever ignored — rather, nurses, doctors, or the patients themselves often develop their own “work-around” when the ideal solution is missing. These “work-arounds” represent ideal opportunities for innovation."


Via Sam Basta
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Now is a great time (better late than never) for healthcare to entertain the idea of disruptive innovation given that so much solution generation is occurring through end users who, having experienced major challenges within the system have gone outside it to create answers.  If we take a look at the origins of many non-profits and vendor based services, we find they are often built on a foundation of an individual who could not get their need or needs met within the system.  

 

Patients, caregivers and healthcare professionals who live the day in and day out of healthcare have first hand experience with the obstacles, challenges and the what's missing.  Many will just make do with what is, but some will ask 'how can I make it better?' then create a solution.  

 

Even when outreach occurs and speciality areas like pharma bring in advocates and game changers to find out how to do different/more for the patient, there seems to a strong failure to follow through to next steps.  Innovation requires more than new ideas.  It requires action and follow through...but first steps - engaging in the idea of opening up to the incredible expertise, insight and energy out there in the patient and healthcare worker populations is a great start.

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Sam Basta's curator insight, March 9, 8:42 AM

Healthcare Innovation by Design on LinkedIn: the leading forum of healthcare delivery and experience innovation knowledge and networking with 7900+ innovation leaders at http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Healthcare-Innovation-Design-2579818/about

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10 Cancer symptoms men shouldn’t ignore | MD Anderson Cancer Center

10 Cancer symptoms men shouldn’t ignore | MD Anderson Cancer Center | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Cancer symptoms in men are often vague. Think nagging back pain or frequent indigestion. Find out what signs every man should look for.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Some men can tend to "tough it out" or hesitate to engage with their health proactively...here's a quick checklist for men as a reminder.

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Cancer Messed With the Wrong B*tch: To Womb It May Concern

Cancer Messed With the Wrong B*tch: To Womb It May Concern | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Most of the articles I see about young women with cancer are about women who are mothers-- which is tragic, and breaks my heart every time I read them.
Tambre Leighn's insight:
Powerful article on the realities of cancer for young adults.
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Longview woman, 26, perseveres after stunning diagnosis of Stage 3 breast cancer

Longview woman, 26, perseveres after stunning diagnosis of Stage 3 breast cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
When Melissa Gipson first told doctors she felt a lump in her breast, they dismissed her concerns. Now, the 26-year-old will undergo a double mastectomy Tuesday, after being diagnosed with
Tambre Leighn's insight:

This has GOT to stop!  We must help people take charge of their own wellbeing, trust their intuition and have the communication and advocacy skills to be heard by the medical community.  

 

At iPEC, more and more of our certified professional coaches are now providing coaching to cancer survivors and in wellbeing - and we're expanding our work even further in healthcare with our programs for healthcare professionals and leaders to embed our Coach Centric skills within their roles.  

 

We've heard these stories too many times and the cost of refusing to listen to a patient's concerns is one that, in the end, impacts not just the patient, but all of us in one way or another.  

 

Enough is enough. 

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Healthcare Innovation Council Cites 2 Reasons Why EHRs Fail to Deliver

Healthcare Innovation Council Cites 2 Reasons Why EHRs Fail to Deliver | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Sigh...The Healthcare Innovation Council, an independent group of healthcare experts has urged Congress to re-examine the direction of the Meaningful Use program,

Tambre Leighn's insight:

Sigh...true that EHR's may not deliver because healthcare practitioners, the ones who have to use them, are not typically consulted regarding their development...AND...crickets...

 

...again, no mention of the patient...you know, the person whose health is on the table.  With all the calls for patient centered care, patient engagement, medical home models and more, it is shocking there is no and in an article like this...still.  Patients and caregivers are our strongest resources when it comes to understanding what will engage the patient in their care and own wellbeing. 

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Stupid Cancer Road Trip | Orange, CA | 4/18/14 | #SCRT2014

Stupid Cancer Road Trip | Orange, CA | 4/18/14 | #SCRT2014 | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Young adults, a largely unknown group in the war on cancer, account for 72,000 new diagnoses each year; one every 8 minutes. SCRT2014 is a cross-country grassroots campaign raising awareness that young adults in their teens, 20s and 30s can and do get cancer—and that Stupid Cancer, a nonprofit organization, is here to help.
Drivers Kenny Kane and John Sabia will rack up an estimated 5,000 miles across the US, making stops along the way in major markets to host special events, visit cancer centers and connect with the local cancer community. Track the tour on its official Tumblr page to view and share daily photos, videos and blog posts.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Is the Stupid Cancer Road Trip coming near you?  Calling all Los Angeles/Orange County area YA Cancer Survivors - come out and meet Kenny Kane and the rest of the SC gang at Lucky Strikes for some fun and to meet other young survivors.  

 

Not local to LA/OC?  Checkout  http://omgsummit.org/roadtrip/2014/ to find out if SC Roadtrip will coming near you this April!

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No Joke | Disruptive Women in Health Care

No Joke | Disruptive Women in Health Care | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tambre Leighn's insight:

It is real action that creates change...not - and pardon my language - stupid games.  Cancer is not a game, prevention is not a game.  The author of this well written post is more gracious than I...sometimes I just have to call a "spade a spade" as they say.

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Latest Updates on OMG2014

Latest Updates on OMG2014 | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tambre Leighn's insight:

stupidcancer roadtrip!  YA cancer survivors...check out the list to see if Kenny Kane and stupidcancer are coming YOUR way on the way to OMG Summit 2014 in Vegas!

 

Come join us - and get some coaching strategies during my Sunday, April 27th 9am session "Withdrawal: Life After OMG!" to harness the energy of the experience and step up your empowered survivorship with an action plan and how to stay connected to your tribe tips!

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MISSION: REMISSION: Insurance Issues, and my 2 yr anniversary of being a stage 4 survivor

MISSION: REMISSION: Insurance Issues, and my 2 yr anniversary of being a stage 4 survivor | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Being a survivor means being your own self-advocate.  Love how Michelle prepared for her insurance conversation, was ready to lay out her case with facts and got the results she wanted.

 

Sometimes, unfortunately, people won't listen until you raise your voice.  What if insurance company employees were trained in Coach Centric skills of active listening, open ended questions and more?  How might patients like Michelle have a completely different experience when they run up against a billing challenge?  So many opportunities to improve the customer - and the human - experience.

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Exercise Cuts Breast Cancer Risk For All Women Everywhere

Exercise Cuts Breast Cancer Risk For All Women Everywhere | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Evidence has long suggested that exercise may help prevent breast cancer. After looking at cancer risk in 4 million women, French researchers concluded any type of exercise is beneficial.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

And...again...more data and the message it doesn't have to be training for a marathon level of physical activity to have an impact.  Get moving toward greater health and less risk today!

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Beth A. Williams's curator insight, April 5, 1:52 PM

A callout to all of us: get moving!

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ESPN Anchor’s Private Battle With Cancer Becomes a Public One

ESPN Anchor’s Private Battle With Cancer Becomes a Public One | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Each recurrence of cancer seems more dire, and yet after each, Scott has returned to his high-profile work at ESPN, ensuring that his private fight also has become a very public one.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Powerful article on one man's choice to publicly share his battle (his languaging that empowers him) while also choosing to not be given estimates and outcomes by his medical team.  A great example of how each survivor must be honored for the choices they make with regard to treatment, how much/little information they want to hear and how they choose to speak about their experience - be it a journey, a fight, a challenge or a gift...that is theirs to decide, not ours.

 

I was, however, very disappointed in author Richard Sandomir's choice to make an end run regarding Scott's refusal to speak to what stage or how long he may have.  He missed the point and the opportunity to respect Scott's choice and, instead decided to interview a cancer specialist from MD Anderson who has never met Scott or, we can assume, has seen any of his medical records to get the specialist's opinion on Scott's status.  Scott could not have been more clear about his wishes and this blatant disregard brings up ethical questions for me, both on the part of the writer and the medical expert.

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Breast cancer and online community support: Xeni speaking at SXSW

Breast cancer and online community support: Xeni speaking at SXSW | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
"If you're at SXSW in Austin, Texas today, do come by the Hilton Level 6 Salon F room at 330pm today (Monday March 10, 2014) for a panel on #BCSM (Breast Cancer Social Media), which I'll be moderating. The video here explains a little of the story behind #BCSM, but the short version is that it's a wonderful online community for people like me who have breast cancer, founded and maintained by women with breast cancer and a health care provider who treats people like us.Panelists: Alicia Staley, Jody Schoger, and Deanna Attai, the women who created #BCSM.Boing Boing editor/partner and tech culture journalist Xeni Jardin hosts and produces Boing Boing's in-flight TV channel on Virgin America airlines (#10 on the dial), and writes about living with breast cancer. Diagnosed in 2011."
Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:
So wish I could have attended. Great to see the #bscm model getting its due along with the amazing founders. Hearts and heads in the right place and truly there to support, educate and inspire.
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Anna’s Story

Anna’s Story | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
A fourteen year old Hodgkin's survivor shares the story of her journey in this not to be missed interview. A model of grace, courage, faith and possibility.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

A young twitter follower reminded me today of this three part interview I did with an extraordinary young cancer survivor.  This is a story of resilience...and joy...and courage.

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Yoga Could Improve Quality Of Life For Women With Breast Cancer

Yoga Could Improve Quality Of Life For Women With Breast Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
"Yoga may help combat pain, fatigue and depression among women battling breast cancer, according to a recent study MedicalNews Today reported. Researchers found that yoga may ease some of the side effects of radiation therapy, one of the main treatments from cancer, by regulating stress hormones, improving quality of life beyond treatment, Medical News Today reported."The benefits of yoga are above and beyond stretching," Lorenzo Cohen, a professor of oncology at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and lead author of the study published Monday in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, told ABC News. "These findings may improve outcomes in cancer survivors."For the study, researchers randomly assigned 191 women with breast cancer who were undergoing radiation therapy into one of three groups. One group did yoga, another did simple stretching exercises, and a third group did neither. The participants in the yoga and stretching groups attended sessions for one hour, three days a week throughout the six weeks of their radiation therapy.Women in the yoga group reported a reduction in fatigue, whereas the women in the other two groups did not. They also reported better general health and functioning at 1,3, and 6 months after radiation treatment."
Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:
Yoga has so many benefits. Great to see the medical community is doing studies, gathering evidence and educating survivors,
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Cancer and Careers - Free Publications | Publication Order Form: Select Publications

Cancer and Careers - Free Publications | Publication Order Form: Select Publications | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Job Search Toolkit and 3rd Edition of Living and Working With Cancer now available.

Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great, free resources for cancer survivors seeking support and information on navigating through the impact on career.

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Teresa Levitch's curator insight, March 20, 6:08 AM

These are free, for you or someone you care about.

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Triple Negative Breast Cancer Awareness Day: Continuing the battle

Triple Negative Breast Cancer Awareness Day: Continuing the battle | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
On Triple Negative Breast Cancer Awareness Day, Fox News producer Annie Goodman shares her battle with the disease
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Annie Goodman is unstoppable...in so many ways.  Take time to get educated about Triple Negative Breast Cancer and read her inspiring story.

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Fertility Issues Take Back Seat to Breast Cancer

Fertility Issues Take Back Seat to Breast Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"A majority of young breast cancer patients expressed concern about the effects of treatment on fertility, but few altered treatment or took advantage of fertility preservation options, investigators reported.

Overall, 51% of 620 patients said they were concerned about infertility after treatment, but fewer than one in five changed their treatment because of fertility concerns. Though most of the women had discussed fertility issues with their physicians, only 10% opted to avail themselves of fertility preservation techniques, according to Kathryn J. Ruddy, MD, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and co-authors.

The results pointed to shortcomings related to physician-patient communication and understanding about factors that influence cancer patients' decision-making about fertility preservation, they reported online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

"Nearly one third of the patients in our study did not recall discussing the impact of oncologic therapies on fertility before initiating treatment, suggesting that it is crucial that we continue to improve communication about fertility risks and options for fertility preservation, as well as to provide emotional support as young women come to terms with the impact of cancer on their hopes for a normal future," the authors concluded."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Yet another reason why we simply must bring Coach Centric skills into healthcare and embed them within the roles of our healthcare professionals.  When physicians and others learn to stop and ask one simple question, "With regard to the information I've just given you, what did you hear?"  Asking patients to speak back what they've heard quickly helps the professional understand if they are present and able to take it in or overcome by stress and unable to listen fully.

 

 "What implications might a choice to or not to preserve fertility have for dreams or plans you have to possibly be a parent?"  How might one or two simple, open ended questions help patients voice their fears and their desires so fertility planning and take actions that align with their values and priorities in life vs. being fear based or unconscious?

 

This is what we do through the 7th Level Wellbeing programs for healthcare professionals.  To learn more, email me for our white paper "The Role of Coaching in Transforming Healthcare" at tleighn@ipeccoaching.com

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Susan Zager's curator insight, February 25, 11:40 AM

More needs to be known about fertility and the impact of oncologic therapies for women before they undergo treatment. To see the study referenced in the article go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2014/02/24/JCO.2013.52.8877.abstract