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Rescooped by Tambre Leighn from Breast Cancer News
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Brad Flory column: Cancer, courage and the Stage 4 Traveling Pants

Brad Flory column: Cancer, courage and the Stage 4 Traveling Pants | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"JACKSON, MI – Cancer has made Stephanie Maltby too weak for travel, but her pants go all over the world.

 

They’re the Stage 4 Traveling Pants, the most famous pair of denim jeans ever to spread awareness that surprisingly young women can die of breast cancer.

Maltby, a former registered nurse at Allegiance Health in Jackson, was the first person to sign the pants after she was diagnosed at age 30 in 2009.

Since then, the jeans have been shipped to and from five continents to be signed and decorated by dozens of young women facing Stage 4, or terminal, cancer. The pants give them a bond and an unseen support group.

“Hope,” one woman wrote on the pants. “Do not forget how strong we are.”

“Most of the girls who had the pants are gone now,” said Shannon Kegebein, Maltby’s sister and the person whose idea created the Stage 4 Traveling Pants.

News coverage often follows the pants from city to city. The jeans were displayed at a “gallery event” in Washington D.C. and at Lee Denim Days in Kansas City.


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

This is what inspiring survivorship looks like...incredible story of how cancer creates community and compassion.  RIP Stephanie.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, January 13, 9:44 AM

What a beautiful idea Stephanie Maltby started to have these pants shipped and signed by dozens of incredible young women facing Stage IV terminal cancer. The pants have travelled five continents and got back to Stephanie from Israel. Now sadly Stephanie Maltby, a former registered nurse at Allegiance Health in Jackson has died on January 12, 2014 of metastatic breast cancer at the age of 34. 

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5 Reasons Why Yoga Works

5 Reasons Why Yoga Works | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Yoga literally means union, this is one of the first things we hear our teachers tell us when we start practicing yoga. And even before that we’ve already been bombarded with the cliché mind, body, spirit.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Yoga has definitely brought another level of wellbeing to my life, personally.  The yoga style that best suits me is Bikram Yoga.  My favorite studio is www.bikramyogamarinadelrey.com.

 

Not all hot yoga is Bikram - just turning up the heat isn't it.  Always check with your medical team before embarking on a new physical activity regime and also be sure to use qualified instructors, no matter what activity you're undertaking.

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Heroic Measures

Heroic Measures | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
The online writings of a woman who has been fighting cancer for seven years invite us to think about the different approaches people take.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Author, Bill Keller points to a number of current challenges facing cancer survivors, particularly those with later stage disease...challenges they will continue to face until healthcare organizations embrace a more Coach Centric approach where each patient chooses, based on their values and priorities, their approach to cancer without being judged.

 

Survivors must be able to choose not only their treatment so it aligns with their concerns with regard to quality of life, but also the language through which they express about their battle or their healing journey.  If Lisa Bonchek Adams has added days to her life by fighting with everything she has and that is what matters most to her, so be it.  If a survivor chooses a different path and approach then we must honor what is right for them.  However, when clinicians fail to interview patients early on and check in throughout their treatment and in survivorship to be sure priorities and goals haven't shifted, then the danger becomes that the clinician and patient may not be on the same page and the patient may not have the information they need to consciously choose their treatment path.

 

We must also continue to clarify our use of the terms 'hospice' and 'palliative care' as we've created a barrier due to the perception that they are one and the same.  Palliative care is not uniquely related to end of life but is about measures to address quality of life issues at any point on the cancer continuum.  Check out my blog post on "Shattering the Misperecptions of Palliative Care" - http://wellbeyondordinary.com/shattering-misperceptions-of-palliative/

 

There simply is no right or wrong way to go through the cancer experience as a patient/survivor.  Educating clinicians in a Coach Centric approach as we do through our 7th Level Wellbeing Coach Centric Leadership Engagement Program for Healthcare (CCLEP4HC) in the tools, skills and strategies of coaching to embed them in their healthcare role will go a long way in overcoming the major challenges Bill Keller highlights here.  For more information, go to www. iPECWelbeing.com

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Rescooped by Tambre Leighn from Breast Cancer Advocacy
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Feds add breast cancer drug mandate | BenefitsPro

Feds add breast cancer drug mandate | BenefitsPro | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is adding breast cancer prevention to the basic women’s health preventive services package.

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires non-grandfathered major medical carriers and group health plans to cover the package of services without imposing deductibles, co-payments, coinsurance amounts or other cost-sharing requirements on the patients.

The PPACA preventive services package mandate applies to self-insured group health plans as well as to traditional plans.

HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said today in a blog entry that HHS had already posted breast cancer prevention drug guidance. At press time, the guidance hadn’t appeared.

The breast cancer prevention drug mandate will include coverage for tamoxifen or raloxifene for women who appear to be at high risk for developing breast cancer.

Sebelius added the mandate based on a recommendation from a panel at the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force.

In September, the task force published a recommendation giving use of the cancer prevention drugs a B for women at high-risk of developing cancer. For other women, the task force gave use of the drugs a grade of just D.

A grade of B means that “there is high certainty that the net benefit is moderate or there is moderate certainty that the net benefit is moderate to substantial.”

The task force says women at high risk are women who seem to have at least a 3 percent risk of developing breast cancer in the next five years."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Yes, yes, yes!  More steps toward prevention and removing barriers to preventative care - a proactive vs. reactive approach. Love it!

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Rescooped by Tambre Leighn from PARP Inhibitors Cancer Review
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Breast Cancer Drugs To Be Free For High-Risk Women - Washington Post

Breast Cancer Drugs To Be Free For High-Risk Women Washington Post Starting next September, women at increased risk for breast cancer will be able to get drugs shown to help prevent the disease without a co-pay, the Obama administration said...

Via Krishan Maggon
Tambre Leighn's insight:

A strong step demonstrating a move to a health model of prevention vs. reaction only when disease occurs. We need more ways to remove barriers to care and incentives for people to become leaders in their own wellbeing.  

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There is no patient experience without experiencing your patients.

There is no patient experience without experiencing your patients. | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Memo to the state highway administrators in Ohio—the sign for exit 24 should come after the sign for exit 22, not before it.Anyway, where were we?  I had a wonderful call this week with the Chief M...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Is your treatment center effectively using technology to support your patient experience?  In coaching, we talk about meeting the client where they are at...stepping up and offering tools and support that matches today's mobile and digital lifestyle.

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Exercise helps women tolerate breast cancer drugs

Exercise helps women tolerate breast cancer drugs | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"SAN ANTONIO — Exercise might help women beat breast cancer. Researchers found it can ease the achy joints and muscle pain that lead many patients to quit taking medicines that treat the disease and lower the risk of a recurrence.

#The study is the first major test of an exercise program for women on aromatase inhibitors. These estrogen-blocking pills, sold as Femara, Aromasin and other brands, are recommended for five years after initial breast cancer treatment for hormone-driven tumors, the most common type.

#The pills also increasingly are being used to help prevent breast cancer in women at high risk of it because of family history, bad genes or other reasons. A separate study found that one of these medicines — anastrozole, sold as Arimidex and in generic form — cut this risk by 53 percent. It’s the second aromatase inhibitor shown to lower risk that much.

#Despite how effective the drugs are, many women shun them because they can cause aches and pains, hot flashes and other side effects. About 15 percent of U.S. women have enough risk to merit considering the pills to prevent breast cancer, yet less than 5 percent take them, said Dr. Powel Brown, a prevention expert at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

#The exercise study involved 121 postmenopausal women taking various aromatase inhibitors to treat breast cancer who complained of achy joints on a pain survey.

medicines that treat the disease and lower the risk of a recurrence."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Another benefit to physical activity. 

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General Internists Need Help With Childhood Cancer Survivors

General Internists Need Help With Childhood Cancer Survivors | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Few internists picked correct surveillance for adult survivors of childhood cancer; they say they need guidance, but oncologists rarely provide care plans.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

With one of the leading survivorship care plans, offered by Livestrong, quantifying downloads over four years at only 29,000 while evidence shows they can assist primary care physicians and cancer survivors navigate the transition after treatment 2014 is the year to implement wider spread use.  Time to provide general internists with tools to inrease their ability to support their patients whose lives are touched by cancer.

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Six cancer centers to share $540 million research gift

Six cancer centers to share $540 million research gift | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"In one of the largest-ever donations to cancer research, Ludwig Cancer Research of New York City announced today that it is contributing $540 million to try to resolve continuing mysteries about how cancer starts, spreads and can be thwarted.

The unrestricted money for six cancer research centers established by earlier Ludwig donations is intended as a final gift from the philanthropy founded by the late Daniel Ludwig, a shipping magnate and real estate owner, which has now contributed $2.5 billion globally to cancer research.

The six centers, launched in 2006 with initial grants from Ludwig, are each expected to invest their $90 million and spend the annual income from those investments – about $4 million to $5 million – to fund basic scientific research.

Each of the six centers will have a different research focus. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, scientists will address the problem of cancer's spread, known as metastasis.

"Metastasis is ultimately responsible for 90% of cancer-associated mortality," said cancer biologist Robert Weinberg, who directs the Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT.

Despite the lethal power of metastasis, Weinberg said scientists still can't answer basic questions about it, such as: how do cancer cells get out of the primary tumor, how do they escape to form secondary tumors elsewhere in the body, "and finally, is it possible to attack cancer cells once they've launched metastases, or have they acquired a degree of resistance that will ultimately thwart all of our attempts to eliminate them?"


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Metastatic disease getting a closer look thanks to a major donation.  The past year has seen a significant increase in awareness around the unique challenges of living with metastic cancer thanks, in part, to many of the health advocates out there like Jody Schoger, quoted in this article.  Great to see efforts translate into meaningful action.

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Breast cancer survivors filled with confidence thanks to tattoos

Breast cancer survivors filled with confidence thanks to tattoos | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"The last straw for Susan Duarte was when her nipple fell off.

Her double mastectomy and reconstructive surgery now 11 years behind her, Duarte suffered a fate common for breast cancer survivors: one of her surgically reconstructed nipples didn’t take, and it simply dropped off.

Coming after surgery and cancer treatments, the setback was an almost-comical final ignominy, and one she didn’t have the energy to fight. So she resigned herself to her new reality: one nipple, and a sexless life.

“I didn’t take my clothes off for 12 years,” the brazen, vivacious San Jose native said recently.

Her body wasn’t whole. But at least she was alive.

Several years later, Duarte’s sister, Cindy Dalton, was also diagnosed with cancer. She, too, went through a double mastectomy — but their lives have since changed dramatically.

Just ask them about their breasts — which look normal and whole, with surgery scars and all.

Both women opted for a surgery-free solution to complete their breast reconstructions: getting lifelike nipples applied via tattoos from San Francisco-based artist Sasha Merritt, who is one of a few artists in the United States providing an increasingly popular service for cancer survivors.

What Merritt does sounds remarkably simple. She matches a woman’s skin pigmentation with a custom-mixed ink, and uses light and shadow to draw nipples that look, even a few feet away, just like the real thing. 


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Art heals.  Bless Sasha Merritt for improving the quality of life for breast cancer survivors.  Whatever a survivors chooses - reconstruction, no reconstruction, tattooed nipples, wig, head scarf, stopping treatment - respect that choice.  Survivors have the right to choose what is best for them.  Support and honor them...and support people like Sasha who are there to help.

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5 Tips That My Friend Shared With Me For Life After a Stem Cell Transplant | cancer

5 Tips That My Friend Shared With Me For Life After a Stem Cell Transplant | cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
5 Tips That My Friend Shared With Me For Life After a Stem Cell Transplant Article By Aaditya Sardwal Sophia was diagnosed with stage III myeloma, which is a type of blood cancer. She was working as a teacher in an engineering college.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

A unique and helpful look into life after a stem cell transplant.

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Austin advocate Andrea Sloan dies | KXAN.com

Austin advocate Andrea Sloan dies | KXAN.com | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"AUSTIN (KXAN) - After a seven-year battle with cancer, Andrea Sloan died Wednesday evening.

In a Facebook post to the Andi's Army page, Sloan's mother, Karen Sloan, said her daughter died after complications brought on by pneumonia.

Sloan was diagnosed with ovarian cancer seven years ago, at age 37. When her cancer returned in August, Sloan asked California-based drug manufacturer, BioMarin, to grant her compassionate use of their experimental drug, BMN 673, developed specifically to fight her type of genetic ovarian cancer, as well as genetic, or BRCA 1, breast cancer. 

But BioMarin repeatedly denied Sloan the drug, citing concerns about safety and effectiveness.

The Andrea Sloan Saga: Full coverage

BMN 673 is one of nearly a dozen in a class of drugs called PARP inhibitors currently in clinical trials. Sloan's doctors at MD Anderson believe this class of drugs is her best hope, since all other traditional treatments have been exhausted.  But BioMarin would not grant Sloan compassionate use, even though their drug is headed in to Phase 3 trials and has been highly touted by company executives for its results in the first two phases of clinical trials".


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Self-advocacy is not selfish.  It can lead to creating a movement and change for millions of people.  Cancer Survivors, caregivers and the families and loved ones of survivors have an impact when they join together, as Andi's Army did, led by one amazing woman willing to fight for the opportunity to try every possible approach to stop cancer in its tracks. 

 

When we find something that isn't working as well as it could, we have the choice to complain about it, give up or we can turn it into a mission to transform the situation and create a solution.

 

May Andrea's family and her army find solace in the impact Andrea had on creating positive change for those needing treatment now and in the future.  RIP, Andrea Sloan.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, January 2, 3:30 PM

We are so sad that Andea died. She was a BRCA1 Activist. compassionate use reformer and died way too young. We must continue the fight for compassionate use. 

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i should be out getting drunk right now.

i should be out getting drunk right now. | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
instead, i am hanging at home with my boyfriend after pigging out on takeout and watching all the weirdos on tv freezing in times square.
all i’ve wanted this entire time since i had that abnormal...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Courage.  Inspiration.  Honesty.  That's Annie Goodman.  I'm pulling for her...we need more Annie's in this world. 

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Social media is a conversation, not a press release.

Social media is a conversation, not a press release. | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"Last week was a curious one. First, Guardian writer Emma G. Keller wrote a cancer-shaming article [archived here] on metastastic breast cancer sufferer Lisa Adams’ social media presence. It was an oddly callous piece—but that was not its only fault. Emma Keller admitted that she had conversed with the subject via email and DM on Twitter without telling her that she was doing a story about her, and quoted Lisa Adams’ private direct messages without as much of a notification, let alone a permission. Emma Keller’s piece also greatly misrepresented what was happening with Lisa Adams.

I knew the misrepresentation because I’d been following Lisa Adams and a few other metastatic cancer patients for the last year because I wanted to write a piece on now social media makes visible that which was previously less visible and more isolating—like terminal illness, or metastatic breast cancer, especially for those whose story does not fit into happy narratives of survivors showered in pink paraphernalia. The disease kills many, including those who do everything right including early detection, while fairly little of research funding goes to how to stop or slow the disease in this last (so-called fourth) stage—and people like Lisa Adams are serving an important role in disrupting the dominant, pink-drenched ribbon of early detection, hardship, survival and happily-ever-long-after. So, I’d been following her for awhile—which is why as soon as I read Emma G. Keller’s piece, I was struck by the level of the misunderstanding. It was as if Keller had not done her research.

Unsurprisingly, Emma G Keller received a huge backlash for the piece, mostly on Twitter. Oddly, even though she had tweeted out “tell me what you think” about her piece, she refused to engage in a conversation on Twitter. She wanted everyone to go to her article and leave comments there. This was extra insensitive since racking up page-views at the expense of a cancer patient seems worse than cold, but also because if hundreds and thousands of people you are writing about, including the subject of your article herself, angrily contest your interpretation, it should behoove a journalist to listen and learn, rather than get defensive and double-down.

Yet double down is exactly what Bill Keller did this week in a new column in the New York Times which pretty much repeats Emma Keller’s, whom we learn is his wife, oddly mistaken read of what is happening to Lisa Adams and completely misunderstands why people are outraged. And goes on in the same vein what I can only call cancer-shaming—don’t tweet so much, and pretty much calls her on to accept her fate “with grace and courage”, quoting someone who “perused” the Lisa Adams’ blog, directly implying that Lisa Adams was neither graceful nor courageous."

 


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

We simply must move to a place of non-judgment.  Cancer survivors have the right to choose how they go through the experience.  This means they need fact based information from their care providers and care providers need to be aware of their own potential biases and filters...and recall "do no harm" over cure at all costs approaches. 

 

My late husband was often strongly criticized for his treatment choices and I for supporting those choices.  Did I want him in my life for as long as possible?  Absolutely.  When he did his research and chose to pass on attempting a bone marrow transplant and instead spent six months researching to production design a film for Oliver Stone, traveling first class to places like Morroco, Africa, Paris, London, Viet Nam and more and dining with kings and riding elephants I had faith that he was making the best informed choice for him.  For some people, quality of life means more than quantity of days...and, no, I never felt this or his keeping the terminal diagnosis he received three months before his death secret was selfish.  He was trying to live an extraordinary life under very challenging circumstances while protecting me the best he knew how...and I love him for this.

 

Until we walk in the shoes of another, let us not judge and for those who dare give voice to the challenge, pain and courage it takes to go through cancer, let them speak...you don't have to listen, though in doing so I believe we can be inspired.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, January 13, 11:33 AM

This article gets it right. The write Zeynep Tukefci makes some important points about how Lisa Adams is educationg people about common misunderstandings related to breast cancer which are:

1) Unlike the pink-drenched narrative, breast cancer is not always survived, even if caught early and the patient does everything right.

2) Palliative care is not for the last few weeks of life to be availed of only as last resort, and can be crucial to better quality-of-life throughout all stages of major diseases, especially a painful one like cancer.

3) Clinical trials are not just last-ditch efforts. Lisa Adams was receiving “standard of care”—what she would have gotten if she were not in a clinical trial, during the trial.

4) Many people “live” with metastatic breast cancer fully knowing that it will eventually kill them in months or years, but there is still much that can be done to prolong life and improve its quality."

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Cancer patients' food choices can boost their abilities to fight

Cancer patients' food choices can boost their abilities to fight | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Words that begin with the letter “d,” such as diagnosis, dosage and diameter, becomes part of every cancer patient’s vocabulary. But one “d” word could be the most important of them all: diet.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Nutrition AND physical activity...a great one-two punch in a healthy lifestyle model of prevention.  Get educated today ~ check out recommended physical activity and nutrition guidelines with your medical team.  Knowledge is power.  Practice leads to prevention.

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Caregiver Engagement- The most important component of service quality

Caregiver Engagement- The most important component of service quality | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Healthcare Executives Emphasize the Importance of Caregiver Engagement























Recently we met with a group of healthcare executives and shared our results from a pilot that we had...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

There is a verifiable relationship between caregiver engagement and patient engagement along with other critical factors such as patient satisfaction, patient safety and reduction in medical errors.  As patient satisfaction scores continue to play an increasing role in reimbursements, the ROI for increasing healthcare practitioner engagement will also continue to grow.

 

Focusing solely on tools and programs is also not the answer.  Healthcare organizations must also be sure to address the wellbeing of their healthcare practitioners.  Asking them to provide the highest standard of care for patients without also sending a strong message that the health and wellbeing of clinicians is important as well is counter-intuitive and ultimately will impact the sustainability of engagement measures. 

 

Just as we are moving to a model of addressing the 'whole patient,' we must also being to support the 'whole clinician' which is why our 7th Level Wellbeing Coach Centric Leadership Engagement Program includes a module as well as coaching support for clinicians to address their own personal wellbeing goals.  To find out more, go to www.iPECWellbeing.com today!

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Not meant to survive - Sunrise Rounds

Not meant to survive - Sunrise Rounds | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
No longer is dying about this moment. Dying is something we do slowly, perhaps for years.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Getting real about survivorship.  Great post with exceptional additions through comments from readers!

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Most Cancer Physicians Would Choose Hospice for Themselves

Most Cancer Physicians Would Choose Hospice for Themselves | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

In a survey of almost 4,500 physicians who treat cancer patients, the majority said that they would enroll in hospice if they themselves had terminal cancer. This was especially true for women, primary care physicians, those with more patients in managed care, and those treating more terminally ill patients. Physicians who expressed a higher preference for hospice for themselves were also more likely to discuss hospice care with their patients early on in treatment, suggesting that personal preferences regarding hospice can influence patient care. The survey’s authors therefore suggest that physicians with negative views of hospice for themselves should consider further educating themselves about how hospice may benefit their patients.


Via Cancer Commons
Tambre Leighn's insight:

If evidence suggests physicians' personal views may impact or influence patient care and what options and choices are offered, how can patients be sure they are being informed without bias?  Through better communication skills, self-advocacy, and giving themselves permission to ask questions about the physicians' personal beliefs. More evidence that patients must take the lead in being educated and ensuring they are clear how personal opinion may or may not be influencing information they are or are not receiving.

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, January 9, 12:09 AM

ASCO Post  |  Jan 7, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, January 9, 10:40 AM

ASCO Post  |  Jan 7, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, January 9, 10:40 AM

ASCO Post  |  Jan 7, 2014

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My cancer shows how our world is ruled by love

My cancer shows how our world is ruled by love | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Love is when I know this cancer will hurt, and will make me sick, but it will not kill me. Love is too strong not to live for.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

What it looks like to choose love over fear or anger...this is what empowerment looks like when cancer takes someone's life in an unanticipated direction.  Powerful post and beautifully written.  When survivors share so openly, they make a huge contribution to others.  Whether your are a cancer survivors, caregiver or just someone who wants to be inspired to come from a new perspective for 2014, there are gifts and insights worth your time.

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Tapping the Resources of Online Patient Communities

Tapping the Resources of Online Patient Communities | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"Without question, one of the most important benefits of healthcare social media engagement for oncology practitioners is the opportunity to gain broader insights into how patients and their caregivers are coping with their cancer, as well as a better understanding of the needs of survivors after their treatment ends.

“Patients are much more likely to share details of their disease with other patients who are going through it as well,” noted Brian Loew, cofounder and chief executive officer of Inspire, a Princeton, New Jersey–based organization promoting online patient communities (OPCs).

When Inspire was launched in 2005, each of its founders had family members with medical conditions, and they were looking to create a supportive, online space for both patients and caregivers. “We started very small,” he Loew explained. “Our first partner was the Children’s Inn at the National Institutes of Health, followed by WomenHeart.”

Inspire has since grown to 106 such partnerships. In addition to oncology, Inspire moderates online communities for rare diseases and genetic conditions, infertility, and fibromyalgia (Box).

“Oncology is actually Inspire’s strongest area,” Loew noted. “I think the reason that cancer seems to create such strong communities is that there is a huge role for the patient and the caregiver.”


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

No question, social media and technology have a role to play in supporting patients and caregivers through education, empowerment and self-advocacy efforts.

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Defining Patient Experience: (noun), see Snowplow

Defining Patient Experience: (noun), see Snowplow | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
The temperature showing on the car’s digital display in the garage was thirty-two degrees.  Two minutes after exiting the garage the temperature displayed was zero.  The weatherperson on NPR stated...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Snowplows, zero, HCHAPs and patient experience.  A don't miss read on what HCHAP scores are missing.  Great read!

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My one year ‘birthday’

My one year ‘birthday’ | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
One year later.




 




One year that seems like a lifetime.  This time last year I was laying on a table with my scalp cut open and a chunk of my skull sitting on a table.  My ...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Some people simply will not go down for the count.  Check out the awesome one year anniversary blog by YA survivor, Ryan.  Attitude makes such a difference!

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The Conversation Project - Home

The Conversation Project - Home | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Talking about dying isn't easy, but it's vitally important. Explore the Conversation Starter Kit and learn how to think about and talk about your wishes for end-of-life care.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

"60% of people say making sure their family is not burdened by tough decisions is 'extremely important'.  56% have not communicated their end-of-life decisions." Here's a powerful and unique approach to expressing your wishes.  Ellen Goodman brings light to a really important conversation.

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Shopping Tips for Prevention from MD Anderson

Tambre Leighn's insight:

Love the three simple tips - shortest ingredient list, ingredients you can pronounce and lowest amounts of sugar, salt & fat...easy ways to begin to make healthier choices at the supermarket.

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Missing a Cancer Diagnosis

Missing a Cancer Diagnosis | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Like many women, I misinterpreted the muted symptoms of ovarian cancer. By the time a CT was ordered, the cancer had progressed to a stage that is treatable but not curable. I was furious at myself and upset with my doctor.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Sadly, I have heard similar stories, most often from YAs.  Trust your intuition and what you know about your body.  Insist on a second, third or more opinion if necessary.  You are your own best advocate.

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