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Rescooped by Tambre Leighn from Lung Cancer Dispatch
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Minority of Oncologists and Primary Care Physicians Fully Discuss Survivorship Care Plans With Cancer Survivors

Minority of Oncologists and Primary Care Physicians Fully Discuss Survivorship Care Plans With Cancer Survivors | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"Of 53 National Cancer Institute cancer centers, only 43% report implementing survivorship care plans for at least some of their cancer survivors. In a study reported in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Blanch-Hartigan et al found that a minority of a nationally representative sample of oncologists and primary care physicians routinely discuss all aspects of survivorship care or furnish survivorship care plans for cancer survivors."


Via Cancer Commons
Tambre Leighn's insight:

This is an ongoing issue...nearly a decade after 2005 studies showing the value of providing a care plan.  Time for implementation of a low cost strategy with a high quality of life impact potential....and how about a plan that isn't only focused on the medical experience?  Survivors also need a plan for living their life - we need a call for care plans that support the whole individual....now.

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 6, 2014 2:33 PM

The ASCO Post  |  May 6, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 6, 2014 2:33 PM

The ASCO Post  |  May 6, 2014

Teresa Levitch's curator insight, May 31, 2014 4:11 PM

This needs to change to save lives.

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iPhone App That Detects Skin Cancer

iPhone App That Detects Skin Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
The DermoScreen app, developed in Houston, works with a dermoscope attachment. The lens scans unusual looking lesions and highlights at-risk patients.

Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Putting more control into the hands of individuals...technology that may eventually help people take responsibility and have more opportunity to save their own lives.  Looking forward to hearing outcomes of the current testing at MD Anderson!

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, May 9, 2014 8:10 AM

An app for the iphone has been developed to detect skin cancer, and is now being evaluated at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre.

Early testing has found the device to be accurate 85% of the time. This is more accurate than family doctors who were found to have an accuracy average of 50% to 70%. Specialist dermatologists typically have an accuracy rate of 90%.

The app relies on the connection of a special magnifying lens attached to the iphone.

Rescooped by Tambre Leighn from Breast Cancer Advocacy
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Bipartisan Bill Introduced to Help Breast Cancer Patients

Bipartisan Bill Introduced to Help Breast Cancer Patients | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"WASHINGTON, DC – Bipartisan legislation was introduced by U.S. Representatives Bill Posey (R-FL) and Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-FL) to help aid breast cancer patients in their recovery following surgical procedures. 

There is the risk of infection following breast cancer surgery due to the placement of post-surgical drains. Medicare currently covers the cost of post-surgical water resistant coverings in some circumstances, but not breast cancer surgery.

The Post-Mastectomy Infection Reduction Actauthorizes Medicare to also extend this coverage for breast cancer patients when it is determined to be medically necessary to reduce the risk of infection.

“If a patient develops a surgical site infection and has to be readmitted to the hospital, not only is this bad for the patient but it would likely cost thousands of additional dollars,” said Rep. Posey. “The small cost of water resistant coverings in cases where the physician believes they are medically necessary to prevent infection will save lives and money by reducing the risk of infection. As a cancer survivor myself I can understand the struggle that so many with cancer and other diseases go through on a daily basis.”


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Seems like a win/win for everyone.  Grateful to those who continue to raise awareness and voices inside the political system.

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When Talking About the End of Life, Honesty and Words Matter - National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS)

When Talking About the End of Life, Honesty and Words Matter - National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Dialogue makes a difference.  Great to see long overdue conversations that, no doubt, will lead to better use of palliative care to increase quality of life and more conscious discussions with family members, friends and healthcare professionals on topics that have too long been skirted around or even ignored.

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CureToday.com: Blogs - Guest - A trip to Vegas with Stupid Cancer

CureToday.com: Blogs - Guest - A trip to Vegas with Stupid Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

A trip to Las Vegas does not typically include discussions on career rights, fertility options and sexual dilemmas. It doesn't necessarily mean you will see a comedic speaker, who is also a published author with a PhD, talk of his personal struggles and major accomplishments.

 

One might not expect to meet the CEO of an organization who has spent so much of his time and energy helping others and changing lives, and now changing mine. I can also say that one might not plan to share a connection with over 500 people one has never met before.

 

But I did.

Tambre Leighn's insight:

THIS is what an empowered young adult survivor looks like. Learn more about the impact StupidCancer.org has for the community it serves through events such as the OMG Summit and more in this great blog post by one of the attendees.  One weekend, one organization, one person can change lives!!

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Empowering Patients Is More Than Engagement

Empowering Patients Is More Than Engagement | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"I was invited to participate in the 2014 Rev Forum, a “big-tent” type of event sponsored by LiveSTRONG and Genentech, and featuring the participation of ASCO’s Conquer Cancer Foundation, who had extended the invitation to me. The Rev Forum brings together a diverse group of participants—from clinicians, to policymakers, artists, advocates, and most importantly, patients, to rethink cancer care. As I considered what issues we could address, one thought was first and foremost in my mind: how to engage and empower more patients in these types of discussion.

In the business community, distinctions are clearly made between engagement and empowerment. Engagement reflects one’s understanding of purpose and mission, and the shared commitment from all involved to seeing an organizational goal accomplished. In contrast, empowerment refers to the ability to do what one wants and/or feels necessary to accomplish a task. The best way to realize a mission or achieve a goal is to be both engaged and empowered.

As a clinician, I want my patients engaged. It is important to me that they understand their diagnosis, prognosis, and the treatments they are being asked to take. I want them to feel invested in their therapy and to understand their side effects and how they will be monitored. When my patients are engaged, I see myself as a partner in their care. Their treatment becomes a shared responsibility and the doctor-patient relationship is one of equals. To me, patient engagement lies at the heart of ethics in medicine and informed consent. Indeed, it is a reflection of good patient care."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Survivors do not have to leave it to fate that they may or may not end up with a physician who has the time and the consciousness to be their patients' "sherpa".  As much as I have great admiration for the sherpas I met in Kathmandu, we have guides who know how to navigate the path to empowerment right here at home. We are cancer survivorship coaches...and we have the tools and skills to help survivors not just engage in their experience but live in an empowered way.  To learn more about becoming a cancer survivorship coach, go to http://www.ipeccoaching.com/Becoming-a-Cancer-Survivorship-Coach

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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 26, 2014 6:18 PM

It's so refreshing to read Dr. Don Dizon's words reflecting the importance of patients being engaged in their cases. When facing a cancer diagnosis patients and doctors have the shared responsibility to work together in decision making related to targeted treatments, financial issues, care guidelines, side effects and options related to each individual case.

Don Dizon will be speaking at Rev Forum, a conference in Washington DC, May 8-9, 2014, (with registration still open), where medical professionals,  patients and doctors can "connect with leaders in cancer treatment, advocacy, and policy to build a new paradigm in cancer care." For more information about Rev Forum go to: http://www.rev-forum.com/.


Susan Zager's curator insight, April 26, 2014 6:19 PM

It's so refreshing to read Dr. Don Dizon's words reflecting the importance of patients being engaged in their cases. When facing a cancer diagnosis patients and doctors have the shared responsibility to work together in decision making related to targeted treatments, financial issues, care guidelines, side effects and options related to each individual case.

Don Dizon will be speaking at Rev Forum, a conference in Washington DC, May 8-9, 2014, (with registration still open), where medical professionals,  patients and doctors can "connect with leaders in cancer treatment, advocacy, and policy to build a new paradigm in cancer care." For more information about Rev Forum go to: http://www.rev-forum.com/.

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ASCO Releases First Guidelines on Survivorship Care

ASCO Releases First Guidelines on Survivorship Care | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"The American Society of Clinical Oncology has released three new evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the prevention and management of symptoms that affect cancer survivors: neuropathy, fatigue and depression, and anxiety. The Society notes that these are the first three in a planned series of guidelines on survivorship care, and all are now available online ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (specific citations below).

 

The topics came from a comprehensive list of many topics in cancer survivorship care, which was developed by the ASCO Survivorship Guideline Advisory Group, Gary Lyman, MD, MPH, FASCO, FRCP(Edin), Co-Chair of that committee, explained via email. The topics were then ranked in terms of importance and need in a survey, which included experts on the Guideline Advisory Committee and others.

 

“These three topics were at the top of the list and were considered a good starting point for developing what will become a large ASCO portfolio of survivorship guidelines,” he said, adding that he was not able to say when future guidelines would be released, but they are in the works. Lyman also serves as Co-Director of the Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research in the Public Health Sciences and Clinical Research Divisions at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, as well as Professor of Medicine and Medical Oncology at the University of Washington School of Medicine."

           

 


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

So many resources continue to go to studies...and several of these seem to study a study.  Recommendations are great and guidelines are necessary but so are the resources and processes to implement.  

 

Survivors need guidelines translated into action that impacts their quality of life now.

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Weight Increase Linked to Higher Ovarian Cancer Risk

Weight Increase Linked to Higher Ovarian Cancer Risk | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

A new report finds a probable link between being overweight and an increased risk of ovarian cancer.


Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Wow...the last four articles on my scoop it newsfeed all highlighting healthy lifestyle behaviors as prevention....nutrition, reduced stress, sleep, healthy weight.  Choices that support a healthy lifestyle, increased immune health = opportunity, responsibility to ourselves to follow through.

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 18, 2014 11:51 AM

A report published by the American Institute for Cancer Research and World Cancer Research Fund, analyzed several ovarian cancer studies conducted globally and found a probable link between being overweight and an increased risk of ovarian cancer. The report found the risk of ovarian cancer rose 6% for every increased 5 BMI units.

Thomas Krivak, director of clinical research in gynecologic oncology at West Penn Allegheny Health System, called the findings "enticing," but "not earth-shattering." He said ovarian cancer prevalence has not increased at the same rate as obesity, and that although the number sounds high, a woman's lifetime risk of developing ovarian cancer is 1.5%. A 6% increase puts her risk at 1.59% over her lifetime.

Nevertheless being overweight is generally considered to increase one’s likelihood of chronic disease including cancer.

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Chronic Inflammation Resulting from Typical Lifestyle Choices Promotes Cancer

Chronic Inflammation Resulting from Typical Lifestyle Choices Promotes Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Chronic inflammation has started to become a buzzword in the health world as research builds indicating that it may be the cause of many serious illnesses, from heart disease to cancer.

Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

...and MORE data about the role of nutrition and physical activity in cancer prevention...

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 25, 2014 2:52 AM

There is direct connection between chronic inflammation and the development of cancer, as well as many other disease states. Many factors can contribute to chronic inflammation including stress, toxins, genetic predisposition, lack of exercise and diet.

Many doctors today recommend people take daily anti-inflammatory medicine, such as aspirin, to reduce their chances of developing chronic long-term inflammation. While this may be the case, research indicates this practice may be causing more harm than good for some people.

One byproduct of inflammation is an increase in C-reactive protein in the body, and it is good practice to have this checked during routine medical checkups. Research indicates that foods high in magnesium (e.g. almonds, spinach, cashews, black beans, kelp, pumpkin seeds, etc.) can help reduce inflammation and elevated levels of C-reactive protein.

Maintaining a proper balance between omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids can also help to reduce the risk of inflammation. The typical western diet is deficient in omega-3 fatty acids, and has excessive amounts of omega-6 fatty acids. Research has indicated that excessive amounts of omega-6 fatty acids and a very high omega-6/omega-3 ratio, as is found in today's Western diets, promotes many diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer, and inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

One study found that a ratio of 2.5/1 (omega-6 / omega-3) reduced rectal cell proliferation in patients with colorectal cancer, whereas a ratio of 4/1 with the same amount of omega-3 had no such effect. Studies indicate that the optimal ratio may vary by disease.

The bottom line is that reducing the level of chronic inflammation, assisted by a diet with a lower ratio of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is desirable in reducing the risk of many of the chronic diseases including cancer. To learn more see here - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12442909

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Cancer patients require anxiety and depression screening

Cancer patients require anxiety and depression screening | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"HealthDay News) -- It is important to recognize and treat anxiety or depression among cancer patients, according to a clinical guideline published online April 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Barbara L. Andersen, Ph.D., from The Ohio State University in Columbus, and colleagues evaluated and adapted the pan-Canadian guideline clinical practice guidelines. Overall, the American Society of Clinical Oncology panel deemed the recommendations clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and presented with options that will be acceptable to patients. However, the panel adapted some of the recommendations based on local context and practice beliefs.

The panel recommends that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety periodically throughout care. Validated, published measures and procedures should be used for assessments. Different treatment pathways are recommended depending on symptom level. The risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality is increased by the failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:
Yes...and... Some guiidelines are recommending once a year screenings for distress and anxiety. This is not enough. Stress has major implications and needs to be part of treating the whole patient right from the start - not once a year in survivorship. It's good to be grateful for small steps....but more is needed.
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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 25, 2014 2:49 PM

The study showed that clinicians need to make sure they are evaluating anxiety and depression throughout cancer care, while lessening the negative emotional and behavioral aspects that affect the quality of life of cancer patients.


To see the study go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2014/04/09/JCO.2013.52.4611.full.pdf+html


Carolina Mesa Rios's curator insight, November 27, 2014 12:35 PM

añada su visión ...

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Cancer Patients Face Treatment Disruptions Come June; Immediate and Severe Funding Cuts May Curtail Access to Cancer Clinical Trials

"The nation’s cancer clinical trial network, which provides care to thousands of patients across the United States, may have no choice but to abandon life-saving and life-extending research studies, including support for patients participating in those studies, due to crippling proposed budget cuts. For decades, federally-supported clinical trials have produced critical advances in the fight against cancer, representing one of the greatest returns on research investment anywhere. But this progress could soon grind to a halt due to far-reaching—and largely unnoticed—budgeting decisions that are happening in plain sight."

 

Editor's note: Clinical trials are not only important for testing the safety and effectiveness of new drugs; they also provide an avenue for patients who cannot benefit from standard treatment options to access new, cutting-edge treatments that could help them. In fact, our founder's life was saved by his involvement in a clinical trial.


Via Cancer Commons
Tambre Leighn's insight:

With statistics hovering around one in two men and one in three women being diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime, these budget cuts and the resulting loss of funding for existing current trials and future trials - trials that have successfully extended lives and often lead to treatment breakthroughs.

 

Please pass it on and consider writing your state officials.  If we, as a country, bailed out banks and other financial institutions, surely we can bail out life saving clinical cancer trials.

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2014 5:06 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 4, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2014 5:07 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 4, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 7, 2014 5:07 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 4, 2014

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ASCO Releases First Three Guidelines on Cancer Survivorship Care

"The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) today issued three evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on the prevention and management of symptoms that affect many cancer survivors—neuropathy, fatigue and depression, and anxiety. The guidelines are the first three in a planned series of guidelines on survivorship care. The recommendations reinforce the need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."


"The release of these guidelines come at a time when the number of people with a history of cancer in the United States has increased dramatically, from 3 million in 1971 to about 13.7 million today. Despite these important gains, cancer survivors still face a range of long-term challenges from their disease and its treatment.  Cancer survivors face an increased risk for other health problems, premature mortality and side-effects from treatment.  The transition from active treatment to post-treatment care is critical to optimal long-term health. If care is not planned and coordinated, cancer survivors are left without knowledge of their heightened risks and a follow-up plan of action.

 

"In addition to the guidelines, Cancer.Net, ASCO’s patient information website, has updated information for survivors that is based on ASCO’s latest recommendations."


Via Cancer Commons
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great.  More guidelines.  How much money is spent on research, writing, studies and more to get to the finding that there is a, "need to care for the both physical and psychological needs of cancer survivors."  At some point, information must be turned into action - and many recommendations in survivorship these days come with mandates but no resources to implement or processes by which to initiate.


Cancer survivorship needs more funding and more insurance coverage, not more recommendations  - most of which have already been well documented and published for over a decade.  

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 16, 2014 4:28 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 16, 2014 4:28 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 16, 2014 4:28 PM

ASCO  |  Apr 14, 2014

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Fighting neuropathy with nutrition | Tami Boehmer | Miracle Survivors

Fighting neuropathy with nutrition | Tami Boehmer | Miracle Survivors | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Dealing with neuropathy? Guest blogger and nutrition consultant Patricia Dean-Escoto shares some tasty tips to help manage your symptoms.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great nutrition tips for EVERYONE...nutrition and exercises are great contributors to prevention...and elevating immune system function simply makes sense...whether you're going through cancer, in survivorship or looking to make some healthy lifestyle changes.

 

We can eat and move our way to greater wellbeing.  Being conscious and aware of what you're putting into your body is a great starting place.  How is this food serving me?  How will it support my body and all the amazing systems and processes within?  Will I feel energized after eating this or drained?  Some great questions to start to bring mindfulness to what you're eating.

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Focused Ultrasound Reduces Cancer Pain

Focused Ultrasound Reduces Cancer Pain | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"When cancer progresses and spreads to the bone, patients often suffer debilitating pain. Now, a new phase III clinical trial shows that non-invasive magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound treatment that heats the cancer within the bone, relieves pain and improves function for most patients when other treatment options are limited."


Via Cancer Commons
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Love seeing breakthroughs that contribute to improved qualify of life for survivors.

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 8, 2014 1:32 PM

ScienceDaily  |  May 5, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 8, 2014 1:32 PM

ScienceDaily  |  May 5, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 8, 2014 1:32 PM

ScienceDaily  |  May 5, 2014

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The post-surgery secret your doctors won’t share

The post-surgery secret your doctors won’t share | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
The very operations that save your life leave psychological scars that can be very slow to heal
Tambre Leighn's insight:

How much more evidence...how many more patient stories until we begin to treat the whole patient, not the disease or a part of the body?

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Depression and Cancer: 10 Things You Should Know

Depression and Cancer: 10 Things You Should Know | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"At first glance, the connection between a cancer diagnosis and depression might seem to be an obvious one. However, in patients battling this life-threatening disease, depression can have a serious impact, and even worsen the odds of survival. While the best approach to interrupting this vicious cycle is not fully understood, clinicians can help patients improve their odds by availing them of therapeutic resources and open communication."


Via Cancer Commons
Tambre Leighn's insight:

So few survivors are being screened for anxiety and depression - which impact quality of life.  It's important for survivors and caregivers to be aware of these ten things and communicate with healthcare providers when necessary.

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Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Healio  |  May 13, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Healio  |  May 13, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, May 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Healio  |  May 13, 2014

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New House Chemicals Bill Angers Cancer Survivors | Commentary

New House Chemicals Bill Angers Cancer Survivors | Commentary | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
I am an 18-year survivor of congenital pediatric brain cancer. I was given six months to live when I was a 21-year-old college senior. I lost most of my friends. I lost my career as a concert pianist. I lost my fertility. I lost my dignity. I lost my identity. And I struggled for almost a decade to find a place for myself in this world.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Powerful call to action by StupidCancer.org CEO, Matthew Zackary.  Enough is enough when it comes to toxins - and why current House Chemicals Bill ISN"T enough.

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Breast cancer survivor keeps hair all the way through chemo

Breast cancer survivor keeps hair all the way through chemo | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"LEAVENWORTH, Kan. - A breast cancer survivor who lives in the Kansas City area is turning heads.

Darcy Romondo just finished six rounds of chemotherapy and kept her hair all the way through her treatment. She is the first patient in the metro area to wear the Kansas City-made chemo cold cap, even though it's been around for years.

Kansas City based Southwest Technologies said U.S. doctors either do not know it exists or often distance themselves from it because "it's more of a cosmetic to them," but the Food and Drug Administration is now taking notice and that means doctors and hospitals could soon jump on board. 

Every three weeks, Romondo, a teacher at Leavenworth High School, leaves her classroom for chemotherapy treatments at Olathe Cancer Care. She goes armed with dry ice, her husband and a chilly, 41-degree chemo cold cap."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

While some clinicians who may believe that hair loss is just cosmetic, relatively low priority vs. their focus of treating cancer, if hair loss or fear of hair loss causes stress for a survivor then it is no longer a cosmetic issue. It has become, then, an issue of both quality of life and physical wellbeing from a standpoint of the impact of stress on the immune system.  If an existing solution can help even one survivor feel more empowered and they are helped by avoiding hair loss then time to get aligned with something that's been offered for a number of years with successful outcomes in the UK.  Let's allow the patient to decide whether hair loss is a cosmetic challenge or a quality of life issue and give them the choice.  THAT is patient-centered care.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, May 13, 2014 5:05 PM

The technology for cold caps to protect patients from losing their hair from chemotherapy has been around for a while and is popular in Europe. In  the US, doctors are waiting for the FDA to approve them and according to the article the FDA is looking into it. There are various companies that have them and if a patient is starting chemo that will cause hair loss, it's nice to know there are options.


For rmore information about cold caps go to: http://www.breastcancer.org/tips/hair_skin_nails/cold-caps


For more information about "Chemo Cold Caps" go to: http://www.chemocoldcaps.com/

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OMG! Stupid Cancer Summit 2014 In Review

The weekend was full of engaging speakers, networking opportunities, and meeting up with friends. While the location, Las Vegas, was a neurological nightmare with constant flashing lights and loud ...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great summary recap from brain cancer survivor and advocate, Catherine Blotner.  She explores some important issues around advocacy related to compassion fatigue that are really good reminders to anyone who takes on a caregiver, healthcare professional or advocacy role.  To be in it for the long run, we all need to be mindful of self-care.  Don't miss her take on #OMG2014!

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Unemployment common after breast cancer treatment

Unemployment common after breast cancer treatment | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"Nearly one-third of breast cancer survivors who were working when they began treatment were unemployed four years later. Women who received chemotherapy were most affected, according to a new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center.

 

Researchers surveyed woman in Detroit and Los Angeles who had been diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. They narrowed their sample to the 746 women who reported working at the time they were diagnosed. Participants were surveyed about nine months after diagnosis, and then given a follow-up survey about four years later.

Overall, 30 percent of these working women said they were no longer working at the time of the four-year follow-up survey. Women who received chemotherapy were more likely to report that they were not working four years later."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Cancer and Careers is a great resource for survivors, not just of breast cancer, but any cancer who may need some support and ideas on how to get back to work, employee rights, etc.  

 

There is an annual conference coming up June 4th in NYC - for information on Cancer & Careers, go to...

 

http://www.cancerandcareers.org/

 

 

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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:07 PM

This study brings out important issues with employment and breast cancer treatment. According to the article: ""Many doctors believe that even though patients may miss work during treatment, they will 'bounce back' in the longer term. The results of this study suggest otherwise. Loss of employment is a possible long-term negative consequence of chemotherapy that may not have been fully appreciated to date." 

To see the study go to: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/cncr.28607/abstract;jsessionid=680D92ABD7CE7FF34BE36928F558508F.f04t02


Deborah Fenlon's curator insight, April 28, 2014 4:45 PM

Time for the long term economic impact of breast cancer treatment to be taken seriously

Erika Kettlewell's curator insight, October 11, 2014 11:26 PM

This article may be from a few months ago, however I feel as though it has an importance. It is interesting that such a high percentage of woman are no longer employed after receiving treatment. This type of study has never been brought to my attention however I feel as though this is something that make a lot of sense. My Aunt received treatment over 4 years ago and was able to work only a portion of the hours she had been working previous. My mom also lost wages while being off and it took her months to recover, she also does not work the same hours she used to and find it a struggle to work as much as she does. 

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Inadequate Sleep Can Promote and Speed Cancer Growth

Inadequate Sleep Can Promote and Speed Cancer Growth | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Poor-quality sleep marked by frequent awakenings can speed cancer growth, increase tumor aggressiveness and dampen the immune system's ability to control or eradicate early cancers, according to a new study published online January 21, 2014, in the journal Cancer Research.


Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Get your zzz's...part of a healthy immune system for prevention.

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 25, 2014 1:38 AM

Many health problems are associated with lack of sleep. A new study shows that inadequate sleep can speed the growth of cancer.

According to the study, on an animal model, published in the journal Cancer Research, poor-quality sleep marked by frequent awakenings can speed cancer growth, increase tumor aggressiveness and dampen the immune system's ability to control or eradicate early cancers.

The study director David Gozal, MD, chairman of pediatrics at the University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, commented that "fragmented sleep changes how the immune system deals with cancer in ways that make the disease more aggressive."

This study provides biological credibility in terms of the association between compromised sleep and cancer outcomes.

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How Big the Breast Ca Risk After Radiation as Child?

How Big the Breast Ca Risk After Radiation as Child? | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Women who survived childhood cancers treated with chest radiotherapy had a 20 times greater risk of breast cancer than women in the general population, a study of 1,230 patients showed.

Via Heather Swift
Tambre Leighn's insight:

This weekend at OMG2014 put on by Stupid Cancer, long term late effects for pediatric childhood cancer survivors was a hot topic.  I met so many young men and women facing challenges and concerns - but also taking the lead on finding out more information and getting support as well advocating for more services for their unique needs.

 

It is incredible to see young adult survivors driving the change they are looking for in addressing quality of life issues and post treatment care.

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Heather Swift's curator insight, April 26, 2014 9:57 PM
How Big the Breast Ca Risk After Radiation as Child?    Women who survived childhood cancers treated with chest radiotherapy had a 20 times greater risk of breast cancer than women in the general population, a study of 1,230 patients showed. Read more 
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Chemo Can Make Food Taste Like Metal. Here's Help

Chemo Can Make Food Taste Like Metal. Here's Help | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Patients undergoing chemotherapy need to eat to stay strong. But the drugs can cause nausea and damage taste buds. New flavors and spices can help a lot, a chef says.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Rebecca Katz is a leading expert in nutrition and truly cares about survivors.  She is featured in her own chapter in "10 to Thrive," an eBook project I co-created featuring top experts sharing their top ten lists of tips for the top ten areas of challenge most Young Adult Cancer Survivors face in survivorship.  Download your free copy today at:

 

http://wellbeyondordinary.com/10-to-thrive-ebook/

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Palliative Care Explained - Cancer Today

Palliative Care Explained - Cancer Today | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Palliative care can be offered to cancer patients at any point in their illness, beginning with the initial diagnosis. New research points to its effectiveness.

Tambre Leighn's insight:

We need more clarifying articles like this...palliative care, while it may be provided as part of hospice care, is NOT hospice care.  "Originating from the Latin word pallium, meaning “a cloak,” palliative care offers relief from the symptoms and stresses of cancer."

  

With 70% of Americans unfamiliar with the concept, education and awareness is key in helping those dealing with cancer to get as much relief from stress and side effects as possible.


Self-advocacy requires having the knowledge of services you can benefit from so you can ask for what you need.

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Providing the Balm of Truth

Providing the Balm of Truth | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
An angry family member wanted to give a dying woman aloe vera gel. No one had had time to tell her the truth.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Stunningly beautiful insights and reflections from an oncology nurse courageous enough to walk the reader, and those in her care, through end of life moments.  

 

Yes, we must allocate resources to be sure medical teams have the time available to listen, educate and support those going through the process of letting a loved one pass as well as resources for professional caregivers for outlets around their own feelings of grief and loss.  It's the honorable thing to do.

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