Cancer Survivorship
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Terminally Ill 29-Year-Old Woman: Why I'm Choosing to Die on My Own Terms

Terminally Ill 29-Year-Old Woman: Why I'm Choosing to Die on My Own Terms | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Next month Brittany Maynard will end her own life – but not before fighting for the right for others to do the same
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Absolutely humbling story about advocacy and the right to choose. There is no right or wrong - whether someone decides to do everything possible, including demand right to compassionate use of available pharmaceutical interventions or decides to choose a conscious death on their own terms. Thanks to Brittany Maynard for being a voice for choice.

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Avoiding the Breast Cancer ‘Warrior’ Trap

Avoiding the Breast Cancer ‘Warrior’ Trap | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Let's get real: Cancer doesn't make you stronger.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great, refreshing perspective from physician/husband who sees both sides. While the reporter in question has had her own experience of breast cancer and most likely, only best intentions to inspire readers, messaging to this community has room for greater consciousness.

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When TODAY Said I Was 'Not Bald Enough'

When TODAY Said I Was 'Not Bald Enough' | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Fueled by our fury over the responses we were getting because we weren't BALD, a lot of us wrote TODAY back to explain how gutted we by the fact that a lot of women are getting left out of the conversation, by the media perpetuation that you must LOO...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

We must put a stop to judging what illness - or for that matter, health - looks like. And perhaps it is time for the media to take some sensitivity training. 

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Skirt Size Increase Linked to Breast Cancer Risk

Skirt Size Increase Linked to Breast Cancer Risk | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Women who go up a skirt size every decade between their 20s and their 60s may be at increased risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, a new...

Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

How might your skirt be a metric for your risk for post-menopausal breast cancer? Find out - and then make a commitment to living a life of wellbeing and prevention. While not everything is preventable, why not do everything you can to impact your health and longevity.

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, September 28, 2014 12:35 PM

Many studies have looked at the impact of a woman’s weight on breast cancer risk. However a study published in the journal BMJ Open looked at the risk that gradual changes in weight have on breast cancer risk. To do that the study gathered data from 92,834 postmenopausal women. The indicator used to determine weight increase was the progressive increase in their skirt size over the years from when they were in their twenties. Skirt size increase may be a good guide of the increase in abdominal fat.

What they found was that an increase of one size every 10 years led to a 33% rise in the risk of postmenopausal breast cancer, while an increase of two sizes per decade let to a 77% rise in risk.

The published study full results can be accessed here - http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/9/e005400.full.pdf+html?sid=041103ce-656f-47ba-8c89-0efac85846eb  

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How Doctors Die: Showing Others the Way

How Doctors Die: Showing Others the Way | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
One way that doctors stand out from the general population is in advance planning for the end of life, something that is gradually finding acceptance.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Everyone deserves access to this kind of conscious end of life approach. Let's move the conversation into the patient/doctor relationship instead of it taking an insider's track to be able to make fully informed treatment and end of life choices.

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Cancer Survivorship Care Plans - YouTube

After your doctor declares you cancer-free, you still may have a long road ahead. Dr. Richard Wender of the American Cancer Society explains how a cancer sur... (Video: Dr.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Yes...AND...there is still a missing piece in the survivorship conversation. While Dr. Wender covers three core parts of a care plan and, thankfully, addresses distress, there is still so very little focus on increasing quality of life in all the areas impacted by the experience.

 

The good news is, this conversation about care planning is finally, after a decade or more, gaining momentum...we do, however, have a long way to go with providing the survivors with the services and approaches they need to feel empowered, reduce stress, and be more engaged.

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Women with Cancer: True October

Women with Cancer: True October | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Getting real about getting Pink in October. Great post by the amazing Jody Schoger. In coaching, helping clients create focus is often a key part of the success formula no matter what their goal is - being more empowered as a survivor, publishing a book, changing careers. Schoger hits it head on - that awareness isn't enough and that focus needs to be placed on metastatic disease if we're to make any significant headway in changing the outcomes. 

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Mother's dying wish granted after her nurse takes in her son

Mother's dying wish granted after her nurse takes in her son | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
A single mother's dying wish was for her nurse to take care of her 8-year-old son when she's gone. She's gotten that, and so much more.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

"We loved her, too." Miracles happen when we think outside of the box and let go of how we believe something should come to pass. Incredible story of compassion, community, and love.

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Exercise Found to Increase Tumor Fighting Effect of Chemotherapy

Exercise Found to Increase Tumor Fighting Effect of Chemotherapy | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
believes it could be in part because exercise increases blood flow to the tumor, bringing with it more of the drug in the bloodstream.

Via Graham Player Ph.D., Tambre Leighn
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great information that, once again, exercise makes a difference...but what resources and support are being put into place to support behavior change during a time of high stress for most? Information doesn't always = action.

 

Coaching helps patients create strategies, set goals, have accountability, and work through any blocks by aligning choices with values and priorities. For a white paper on coaching as the missing piece in survivorship, email tleighn@iPECcoaching.com

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, September 19, 2014 1:54 PM

A study by University of Pennsylvania scientists found that combining exercise with chemotherapy shrunk tumors more than chemotherapy alone. Exercise has long been recommended to cancer patients for its physical and psychological benefits.

Previous studies had shown that an exercise regime prior to receiving chemotherapy could protect heart cells from the toxic effects of chemotherapy. But few had looked to see whether an exercise regimen during chemotherapy could also be beneficial. The researchers believe that the benefit could be in part because exercise increases blood flow to the tumor, bringing with it more of the chemotherapy drug in the bloodstream. If this is the case then a smaller dose of chemotherapy may be able to be used together with exercise, and reduce side-effects of the chemotherapy.

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, September 20, 2014 11:34 AM

Great information that, once again, exercise makes a difference...but what resources and support are being put into place to support behavior change during a time of high stress for most? Information doesn't always = action.

 

Coaching helps patients create strategies, set goals, have accountability, and work through any blocks by aligning choices with values and priorities. For a white paper on coaching as the missing piece in survivorship, email tleighn@iPECcoaching.com

Beth A. Williams's curator insight, September 21, 2014 12:54 PM

We've been told about the benefits of exercise for many years, and this research adds another benefit -- reducing tumors faster during chemotherapy treatments, which may also lead to using lower doses of the drugs and lowering related side effects. So we can get on with our lives with less rebuilding perhaps?

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For Many Cancer Sufferers a Second Cancer is the Price of Survival

For Many Cancer Sufferers a Second Cancer is the Price of Survival | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Yet another reason why coaching for cancer survivors is SO imperative. To face cancer twice without the tools of how to be empowered, a strong self-advocate, how to reduce stress created by the impact of cancer and improve quality of life is unfathomable. 

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, September 19, 2014 2:21 AM

Often the price of cancer survival comes with an increased risk for a second cancer. Oncologists and primary care doctors are seeing a significant upsurge in patients with second cancers as survivors age. For some patients, their increased risk appears to be driven by genetic susceptibility; for others, the risks are strongly related to the treatment they underwent for their primary cancer.

Several decades ago, individuals with a second cancer accounted for less than one in 10 cancer diagnoses. Figures presented at ASCO indicate that today these second cancers occur much more frequently, representing 19% of all new cancer diagnoses, nearly one in five, said Lindsay Morton, PhD, a cancer epidemiologist with the NCI.

Investigators do not understand precisely why this happens, but they have identified several risk factors. There are the obvious factors, notably primary cancer treatments, including radiotherapy and, to a lesser extent, chemotherapy. Women appear to be at higher risk for developing second cancers, particularly breast cancer. And patients who were younger at the time of their first diagnosis or who received radiotherapy at a young age also were at higher risk.

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Fighting The Heavy Burden Of Cancer

Fighting The Heavy Burden Of Cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Cancer is a heavy burden for patients as well as the economy. Find out how research is helping.

Via Krishan Maggon
Tambre Leighn's insight:

The ripple effect of cancer is far-reaching and goes well beyond the individual's experience on out in the community and our country, at large. Prevention is key in reducing the burden on individuals, their families, and our economy. Each person has the capability of making a positive change through healthy lifestyle behaviors - we all have a responsibility to move to a more healthy nation.

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Welcome to Well Beyond Ordinary | Life Coaching by Tambre Leighn

Welcome to Well Beyond Ordinary | Life Coaching by Tambre Leighn | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

How well are you thriving through your experience with cancer?

What if you had a cancer survivorship plan and key strategies in place to help you navigate the unknowns of cancer survivorship and build that life where you feel you’re not just surviving your cancer but you are truly thriving?

 
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Valuable information on thriving as a survivor and the importance of survivorship care plans.  Free resources for survivors to help them get educated on advocating for their care plan from medical providers.

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Scream If You Have To … | Coaching Excellence

Scream If You Have To … | Coaching Excellence | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
These days, it takes a lot to make me angry but the story of Maggie Kudirka, an extremely talented ballerina with the prestigious Joffrey Ballet, and her
Tambre Leighn's insight:

It is critical to be your own self-advocate...check out three key tips for taking charge of your wellbeing.

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The Cost of Cancer Drugs

The Cost of Cancer Drugs | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Lesley Stahl discovers the shock and anxiety of a cancer diagnosis can be followed by a second jolt: the astronomical price of cancer drugs.

Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

More evidence of the far reaching impacts cancer diagnosis and treatment has on survivors, their families, and our economy. When we bankrupt people and add things like financial stress, job loss, navigating complex insurance environments, and more to an already heavy burden of life threatening and, often, chronic disease we are causing injury to our communities and our country.

 

Survivorship coaches know very well how many aspects of life survivors struggle with - career, intimacy, fertility, fears of recurrence, relationships, physical energy. We must begin to address the whole person and provide tools and resources for all of the major challenges - and addressing the sticker shock when it comes to the escalating cost of treatments is an essential area to focus on.

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:49 AM

Perhaps we need to start treating the cost of cancer drugs almost as a financial toxicity side-effect of cancer. Watch this 60-Minutes broadcast to learn more. I have summarized below for those who prefer to read.

The investigator for this report was surprised to find:
- just how expensive cancer drugs were, and
- that many oncologists receive a commission when they prescribe cancer drugs

Most cancer drugs are targeted at extending life rather than curing cancer. That life extension likelihood is sometimes suggested as days rather than years. So for patients it may be difficult to decide whether life extension for an additional 42 days is worth the high cost of the drug – such as Zaltrap (for advanced colon cancer) discussed in the report.

The pharmaceutical companies do make a significant contribution to the treatment of cancer. They are entitled to make a profit which continues to fuel innovation. However the high cost of these drugs can result in bankruptcy of the patient’s family. A cancer diagnosis is one of the leading causes of personal bankruptcy today. It is not unusual for patients to take 2 or 3 different drugs for their cancer treatment, each costing $100,000. An entry-level cost of drug treatment probably is around $250,000 in costs.

We may be in a situation where people’s fear and anxiety is being taken advantage of by the cancer industry. Many oncologists believe the cost of the cancer drugs are too high. Drug companies assert that the cost of bringing a new drug to market is $1 billion. So prices reflect the cost of innovation.

Dr Leonard Saltz, Chief of Gasto-Intestinal Oncology at Memorial Sloan Kettering, compared the clinical trial costs of Zaltrap (mentioned above) approved in 2012 to those of another drug already on the market – Avastin. Both drugs target the same patient population, work essentially in the same way, and deliver the identical result of extending median survival by 1.4 months (42 days) when given as chemotherapy. The two drugs look to be the same. Although the Zaltrap study showed it to be a little more toxic than Avastin. So why does Zaltrap cost more than $11,000 per month which is more than twice the cost of Avastin at $5,000 per month?

Together with Dr. Saltz, Dr. Peter Bock, Sloan Kettering’s in-house expert on cancer drug prices, decided to reject Zaltrap based on its high price. This was reported in the New York Times. This raised the issue that the drug companies are permitted to charge whatever they want and there are no controls on this as part of the approval process. The pricing system for drugs is dictated by those who make the drugs. The prices seem to be decided on their own views only, and according to Dr. Brock are based on how brave they are and how little they want to end up being criticized in the New York Times or on 60-Minutes programs.

Media criticism does seem to work. Right after the New York Times article reporting on Zaltrap, the pharmaceutical manufacturer of Zaltrap, Sanofi, cut the price of their drug by half. This was irrefutable evidence that the original price had no basis, and was only profit oriented to meet the company’s financial greed. As a consequence all those arguments heard for decades from the pharmaceutical companies – we have to recoup our money, we are good for society, trust us to set the right price, etc – simply no longer had any credibility. Sanofi lowered the price of Zaltrap in a way that doctors could get the drug for less. But patients were still paying as if it was high priced. According to Dr. Bock, doctors were buying the drug for $11,000 and the company sent the doctors a cheque for $6,000. Then the doctor gets to bill the patient’s insurance company as if it costs $11,000. This made it extremely profitable for the doctors. Basically doctors could double their money if they used Zaltrap.

The commission based approach provides an incentive for the doctors to choose and recommend the most expensive drugs for patients. While this may be advantageous for the drug companies and doctors, it is a system that should be carefully considered in terms of its morality and fairness to patients.

All of this is currently accepted industry practice. John Castellani, President and CEO of the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) – the Trade and Drug Industry’s lobbying group in Washington - comments that the price of the drug needs to reflect the cost of development, and the value it can provide. When asked how it can be that a patient can be taking a drug that is no better than another drug on the market, yet costs twice as much, Castellani responded that “we don’t set the prices; what a patient pays is determined by the patient’s insurance company.”

Another drug example is Glevec, from Novartis, which treats a common blood cancer and requires patients to keep taking the drug indefinitely. This is the top-selling drug for Novartis, bringing in more than $4 billion per year in sales, and $35 billion since the drug came to market. There are several other similar drugs that compete with Glevec. Such competition would normally bring down the prices in a typical marketplace. But the price of Glevec has tripled from $28,000 per year in 2001 to $92,000 per year in 2012. So drug companies are also raising their prices on their older drugs, not just the new ones.

According to Hagop M. Kantarjian, Professor at Department of Leukemia, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, the drug companies are setting prices that are unreasonable, unsustainable and immoral. He believes that the law needs to change that currently prevents Medicare from negotiating for lower prices, which now results in American patients paying two to three times more for the same drug compared to the cost for the same drug in other countries.

To complete the picture, the single biggest source of income for private practice oncologists is the commission they make on prescribing cancer drugs. They buy the drugs wholesale from the pharmaceutical companies and sell them retail to their patients. This fuels the incentive for oncologists to use more expensive drugs for their own financial gain.

Dr. Saltz believes that the challenge is knowing where to draw the line between how long drugs may extend life and how much they cost. We as a society have been unwilling to discuss this topic, and as a result the only people that are setting the line are the people selling the drugs.

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MISSION: REMISSION: CT Scan Results and....yeah....

MISSION: REMISSION: CT Scan Results and....yeah.... | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
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Sometimes the what to do is to bake a cake...

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Local survivor says miracle drug saved her from hospice. Now there's proof it's working on others

Local survivor says miracle drug saved her from hospice. Now there's proof it's working on others | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Good news tonight for women with advanced stage breast cancer. A drug we've been talking about for year, getting a lot of new attention tonight for prolonging the lives of women with the HER 2 positive type. We’re taking action for your health tonight with one local woman who says this miracle drug really did save her life.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

This is the power of advocacy and the role compassionate use can play in medical breakthroughs.

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Estrogen therapy and breast cancer: The pharmacist said no

Estrogen therapy and breast cancer: The pharmacist said no | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
In the end, she used the medication and her sex life is improving. Her relationship with the pharmacist has not.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Over the past few days, a thread about choice has emerged from a range of sources - an EMT who decided he would no longer lie to patients who asked while being treated if they were going to die - an article on doctors with terminal illness and how they often have more say and planning opportunities with regard to their impending death - and now from a pharma perspective in this article.

 

Patient centered care is clearly still in the early stages of being adopted. It is a much needed culture shift. To turn the tide, while we can hope healthcare professionals step into this new culture going forward, most likely where we can have the greatest, fastest impact is by ingraining true patient centered care in medical and nursing schools today along with stronger listening and communication skills. 

 

The lack of compassion this pharmacist showed is unacceptable. The additional suffering this patient had to endure after having the courage to do whatever she and her doctor deemed safe and helpful so she could maintain her intimacy with her beloved husband borders on cruelty. This is a reminder to that patients, unfortunately, need to continue to be their own self-advocate, submit complaints to healthcare organizations about poor care, and change healthcare professionals when their needs are not being met. It is your life, your body, your choice.

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“Am I dying?” The honest answer.

“Am I dying?” The honest answer. | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Matthew O’Reilly is a veteran emergency medical technician on Long Island, New York. In this talk, O’Reilly describes what happens next when a gravely hurt patient asks him: “Am I going to die?”
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Powerful testimony from EMT re: showing compassionate honesty with patients who want to know. To be there with someone in their last moments and create the space for them to experience peace and acceptance or share final thoughts takes courage - the true definition of what it means to be of service.

 

Patients have a right to choose the information they do and do not wish to receive.

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Most Breast Cancer Patients Forgo Reconstruction Surgery Without Regret

Most Breast Cancer Patients Forgo Reconstruction Surgery Without Regret | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

Although universal insurance coverage for postmastectomy breast reconstruction has been mandated since 1998, a new study has found that the persistently high rates of American women who choose not to undergo reconstruction surgery are due primarily to patient preferences and not a lack of awareness.


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG, Heather Swift
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Choice - being at choice, feeling like you have a choice, being supported in your choices - for a survivor to feel empowered, choice is a big part of it. Healthcare professionals, personal caregivers, family, friends, loved ones, and the media must reserve judgment. There is no right or wrong when it comes to what a patient decides.

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Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, September 23, 2014 12:41 PM

To see the study go to: http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1893807


Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, September 24, 2014 12:39 AM

In the USA only 30% to 40% of women who have a mastectomy undergo breast reconstruction surgery.

A study, published in JAMA Surgery, found that 58.4% of 485 patients surveyed decided not to undergo breast reconstruction surgery, citing such reasons as
- not wanting to have additional surgery (48.5%),
- it wasn’t important (33.8%),
- fear of implants (36.3%), and
- a concern about possible complications (33.6%).

Natalie Palmer's curator insight, September 24, 2014 5:38 AM

To see the study published in JAMA go to: http://archsurg.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1893807

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Procter & Gamble drops NFL tie in breast cancer awareness promotion

Procter & Gamble drops NFL tie in breast cancer awareness promotion | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"NEW YORK -  Procter & Gamble is canceling an on-field breast cancer awareness promotion it had been planning with the National Football League, the latest sponsor to respond to the NFL's growing problems.

The consumer products maker is the latest major sponsor, following PepsiCo and Anheuser-Busch, to show concern over the NFL's handling of domestic abuse allegations against several players.

Women make up 35 percent of the average audience of 17.4 million during a regular season NFL game, and the NFL has made it a point to reach out to women in recent years.

RELATED: P&G pushes for NFL action against domestic violence

The league has made Breast Cancer Awareness month in October a particular focus. Part of its NFL Pink "Crucial Catch" campaign, in partnership with the American Cancer Society, features players, coaches and referees wearing pink game apparel, on-field pink ribbon stencils, special game balls and pink coins.

P&G's Crest brand had been working on a program with players from each of the NFL's 32 teams to wear pink mouthguards and participate in other activities.


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Thank you, Proctor & Gamble, for taking a stand. Until the NFL gets serious about no tolerance policies, it is appropriate that campaigns supporting women align with organizations that value women and say no to violence against women. This is the kind of message we need to continue to send to the NFL until policies change.

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laballedanslesetoiles's curator insight, January 26, 2016 7:01 AM

Procter & Gamble drops NFL tie in breast #cancer awareness promotion via @Roger Goodell @Balledanslesetoiles 

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Breast Cancer Survivorship Programs: More Than a Treatment | Page

Breast Cancer Survivorship Programs: More Than a Treatment | Page | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tambre Leighn's insight:

"Access to breast cancer survivor care programs is limited. One study found that only 35% of eligible women older than 65 years received a breast cancer survivorship care plan. These investigators found that age discrimination may play a role in who receives a survivorship care plan: for each 1-year increase in age, researchers found a 5% decreased probability that the patient would receive a survivorship care plan."


So much more work to be done to get all survivors a plan for thriving.

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Cancer and Depression: A Musical Sermon in Three Parts

Cancer and Depression: A Musical Sermon in Three Parts | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Cancer often comes as a package deal with depression. I can't hear this song without thinking of those fighting an ongoing battle with cancer. I can't hear this song without thinking about my own struggles with cancer and feeling depressed....
Tambre Leighn's insight:

From a survivor's perspective - valuable writings on positive thinking, the struggles with recurrent disease, guilt and how to witness the strength and courage it takes some days to answer 'how are you doing?'

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What Caught Our Eye This Week: Patient Empowerment in Discussing End-of-Life Care - National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS)

What Caught Our Eye This Week: Patient Empowerment in Discussing End-of-Life Care - National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Every cancer patient entering this last stage of survivorship deserves to have the option of having these end-of-life discussions.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Conscious conversations lead to conscious choices.

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Breast cancer advocate dies after battle with illness

Breast cancer advocate dies after battle with illness | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"NORTH ANDOVER — An amazing laugh. Dynamic blue eyes. A smile that lit up the room. These are the things Fiona Maguire will remember about her husband Peter Devereaux, a well-liked Marine and male breast cancer advocate who died Thursday after a six year battle with the illness. He was 52.

“He really had a great, light personality. He liked everyone. He was probably the least judgmental person you’d ever meet in your life,” Maguire said. “He never looked at people for money they made, or how they looked,or anything like that.  He was really just a kind man.”

 

Devereaux became well known as an advocate for breast cancer patients through talks he gave at fundraisers in Greater Boston and beyond. Devereaux was part of the largest group of male breast cancer patients ever recorded: former Marines who were stationed at Camp Lejeune. At the North Carolina base, Marines and their families were exposed to toxic water from at least 1957 to 1987. Devereaux served four years with the Marines beginning when he was 18 and was stationed at Camp Lejeune for 16 months."


Via Curated by A4BC.ORG
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Exemplary model of courage - marine with breast cancer turned advocate passes. Honoring all survivors who take their experience and turn it to good to help others today. Thank you for giving during a time when you face what may be the greatest challenge of your life.

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Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:48 AM

Peter was pretty incredible.I was fortunate to meet him with other advocates at SABCS. Our prayers go out to all of his family and friends. 

Curated by A4BC.ORG's curator insight, August 25, 2014 10:51 AM

Peter was pretty incredible.I was fortunate to meet him with other advocates at SABCS. Our prayers go out to all of his family and friends. 

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Why Most Breast Cancer Survivors Don't Get Boob Jobs Post Mastectomy

Why Most Breast Cancer Survivors Don't Get Boob Jobs Post Mastectomy | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Less than 42 percent of breast cancer patients choose breast reconstruction following their mastectomy.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

We must continue to provide education and information to all survivors about issues that impact quality of life. Of course, type of treatment, reconstruction, etc. all come down to personal choice. But people must have all the facts to be able to make an informed decision.  Studies continue to also show a disparity when it comes to minorities and cancer. Cancer doesn't discriminate - nor should cancer care.

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