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Cancer patients require anxiety and depression screening

Cancer patients require anxiety and depression screening | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"HealthDay News) -- It is important to recognize and treat anxiety or depression among cancer patients, according to a clinical guideline published online April 14 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Barbara L. Andersen, Ph.D., from The Ohio State University in Columbus, and colleagues evaluated and adapted the pan-Canadian guideline clinical practice guidelines. Overall, the American Society of Clinical Oncology panel deemed the recommendations clear, thorough, based on the most relevant scientific evidence, and presented with options that will be acceptable to patients. However, the panel adapted some of the recommendations based on local context and practice beliefs.

The panel recommends that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety periodically throughout care. Validated, published measures and procedures should be used for assessments. Different treatment pathways are recommended depending on symptom level. The risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality is increased by the failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression."


Via Susan Zager
Tambre Leighn's insight:
Yes...and... Some guiidelines are recommending once a year screenings for distress and anxiety. This is not enough. Stress has major implications and needs to be part of treating the whole patient right from the start - not once a year in survivorship. It's good to be grateful for small steps....but more is needed.
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Susan Zager's curator insight, April 25, 2:49 PM

The study showed that clinicians need to make sure they are evaluating anxiety and depression throughout cancer care, while lessening the negative emotional and behavioral aspects that affect the quality of life of cancer patients.


To see the study go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2014/04/09/JCO.2013.52.4611.full.pdf+html


Carolina Mesa Rios's curator insight, November 27, 12:35 PM

añada su visión ...

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eUpdate Article for Cancer Survivors, Cancer Caregivers and Cancer Medical Professionals

eUpdate Article for Cancer Survivors, Cancer Caregivers and Cancer Medical Professionals | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Coping with Cancer provides resources for cancer survivors, cancer caregivers, and cancer medical professionals. Articles and stories are presented in a warm and friendly, easy-to-use format, and provides information by specific cancer type, general knowledge about living with cancer, and wellness and inspirational topics. The resource guides are the most complete listings found anywhere. The Coping media team is constantly adding relevant articles and trustworthy resources.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

I absolutely agree that one size does NOT fit all when it comes to cancer, treatment choices, and the impact and outcomes. Individualized approaches make sense - which means patients need to become strong self-advocates and be sure they speak about their specific needs and priorities. 

Important article on considerations and implications for Senior Adults with cancer but it speaks to the bigger picture of shifting to a medical model where, as we do in coaching with our clients, the medical team meets the patient "where they are at." This requires active, and sometimes intuitive, listening skills for healthcare professionals and clear communication by patients.

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eUpdate Article for Cancer Survivors, Cancer Caregivers and Cancer Medical Professionals

eUpdate Article for Cancer Survivors, Cancer Caregivers and Cancer Medical Professionals | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"In 2005, the fine-dining aficionado got the chance to travel to New York and show off his skills on the first season of Food Network’s culinary competition The Next Food Network Star....However, the elation he felt from progressing so far in the nationally broadcast competition was short lived. Two weeks after the show’s finale, Hans got the worst news a foodie could pos­sibly hear: He had stomach cancer."

Tambre Leighn's insight:

Hans Rueffert is an amazing chef (I've had the tasty experience of his food at MD Anderson's Survivorship conference several years ago) and inspiring survivor. Check out this great article about his story and journey in the e-version of Coping With Cancer - a great resource for survivors and caregivers.

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REGISTRATION Opens for YSC Summit: The Only National Conference for Young Women Affected by Breast Cancer and Their Co-Survivors

REGISTRATION Opens for YSC Summit: The Only National Conference for Young Women Affected by Breast Cancer and Their Co-Survivors | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
NEW YORK, Nov. 20, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Though breast cancer is less common in younger women, more than 250,000 women living in the U.S. today were diagnosed before their 41st birthday, and 13,000 more will be diagnosed this year. Young Survival Coalition (YSC) is bringing them together for the YSC Summit, March 6-8, 2015, in Houston, Texas.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Registration is open - join hundreds of women in March 2015 and get educated, connected, inspired...and have a ton of fun. Incredible roster of expert speakers and session topics.

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Beth A. Williams's curator insight, November 22, 6:39 PM

A resource for education, support, and wellness, the YSC is offering a national conference for young women breast cancer survivors and their co-survivors.

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Bose grants reward risk

Bose grants reward risk | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

I'tFive innovative, high-risk projects launch with support from Prof. Amar G. Bose Research Grants.

Tambre Leighn's insight:

When you purchase anything, you vote with your dollars. Here is a company you may want to consider supporting. Congratulations to the innovative cancer research projects funded and to Bose for making them possible!

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15 Influential ePatients and Patient Advocates to Follow

15 Influential ePatients and Patient Advocates to Follow | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Whether its public speaking, blogging, or tweeting, these empowered ePatient & patient advocates are changing the way we think about our role in healthcare.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great influencers and educators to be following in the arena of advocacy for chronic illness, ePatients, and giving patients a voice within medical care.

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Survivorship: How do you want it to be? - YouTube

Presented by Dr. Jennifer D. Irwin, Associate Professor in the School of Health Sciences at Western University.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Excellent presentation by Dr. Irwin with some great insights and simple tips and her personal story on creating the experience you want so you can feel more empowered in survivorship.

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Survivors confront hurdles on job front

Survivors confront hurdles on job front | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Michelle Kierns lost her job as a director of admissions at a long-term-care center last winter, only a few weeks after doctors diagnosed her breast cancer.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great employment tips and strategies for cancer survivors.

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Living with Stage 4: The breast cancer no one understands

Living with Stage 4: The breast cancer no one understands | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
In a culture focused on survivorship, those with metastatic breast cancer who will be in treatment for the rest of their lives can feel isolated and misunderstood.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

For the 40K lives lost each year to metastatic breast cancer and for Jody Shoger (@jodyms) and Diane Mapes (@Single_Shot), sharing this great article to help continue to raise awareness of the REAL story.

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The young survivors, fighting on

The young survivors, fighting on | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tiffany Nardella was engaged to be married, living in South Philadelphia, and loving life when she was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer at 35 in 2010.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Great story on how amazing non-profits like Young Survival Coalition can help create connections and support. For more information, go to:

http://www.youngsurvival.org/

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Programs for Survivorship

Programs for Survivorship | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
I am lucky to have been treated a major cancer center where clinicians take a holistic approach to fighting disease, providing referrals for help with emotional issues and to foster general well-being.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Yes, yes, and yes. Yes, there are significant challenges for long term survivors and, yes, studies attest to the value of care plans...and, yes, organizations like Livestrong, Journey Forward, and others have medically based care plans survivors can use with their oncologists.

 

Yet, there is still a huge gap between these existing plans and a plan that can help survivors address everything beyond the medical that has been impacted. What if there was a plan that helped survivors create a plan for living, not just surviving? Stay tuned.

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Deborah A. Boyle - Cancer's Price Tag Under the Microscope | TheONC | A Gated Community for Oncology Nurses and Cancer Care Teams

Deborah A. Boyle - Cancer's Price Tag Under the Microscope | TheONC | A Gated Community for Oncology Nurses and Cancer Care Teams | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

TheDeborah Boyle explains that contemporary cancer treatment costs may be out of reach for many Americans.

Tambre Leighn's insight:

The financial cost of cancer...a burden for sure...and, as author Deborah Boyle points out, not the complete picture. The effects are far-reaching, beyond the bank account and beyond the cancer survivor. Great article.

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Meet the couple battling male and female breast cancer together

One of the most overlooked aspects of breast cancer, in its sea of pink, is that breast cancer doesn't just affect women. It's a fact...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

This is for the 80% of men who are not aware that they, too, are at risk for breast cancer. ACS estimates more than 2,000 men in the US will be diagnosed with cancer this year. Pass it on...

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Some Key Facts About Your Immune System and Cancer

Many people ask me about the immune system. So here are a few key facts for your information.


Via Graham Player Ph.D.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Interested in prevention? Consider starting with your immune system as a first line of defense.

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 17, 4:35 AM

Your Immune System


Your first line of defense against pathogens.

Your own inner personal ‘military-force’ to deal with unwanted invaders.

Its objective is always to fight, fix, repair, promote detoxification, and maintain your health

Inflammation is one of the instruments used by the immune system to regulate health, usually in acute situations. However chronic and uncontrolled inflammation can have devastating effects on the immune system and your health. Contributors to chronic inflammation include chemicals, pollutants, heavy metals, emotional state, depression, stress levels, certain foods, pathogens, improper lifestyle, inadequate nutrition, etc.

The immune system is a learning system and able to recognize previous infections and eradicate them in the future.

People who have never been ill throughout life with the typical infections we all get from childhood onwards and other disease states, will have a less prepared and ready immune system to fight off future disease.

Many doctors may worry more about the people who have never been sick, due to their potentially less developed immune systems.

We are designed to fight infection, to stay healthy into old age, and to keep brain function into old age. If we treat our body correctly our immune system will work well to ensure we function well as designed.

We need to put the right fuel in our bodies so that our immune system can function optimally. The body and its immune system needs the right nutrients, vitamins and minerals, proper hydration, sleep, exercise, and attention to healthy emotional state, social interaction and lowered stress levels.

We need to remove the stressors that impede our immune system from working optimally.

When the immune system becomes disrupted that’s when bad things can begin to happen that compromise our health, including cancer.


Immune System and Cancer:

We all produce cancer cells everyday as part of our normal metabolism. Our healthy immune system identifies and removes these cancer cells quite adequately.

You cannot have cancer if you have an in-tact optimally functioning and healthy immune system.

If you have cancer then by definition your immune system has been compromised, and your immune system has missed dealing with the cancer.Many people see cancer as a disease of the immune system. A weakened immune system allows cancer cells to grow better. A consequence of chemotherapy and radiation is a weakened immune system.

Conventional cancer treatments, chemotherapy and radiation, compromise the immune system.

Conventional cancer treatment is focused on killing cancer cells, and not addressing the cause of cancer.

Cancer is an ‘obligate glucose metabolizer’, meaning it thrives on sugar (carbohydrate, glucose). Sugar compromises the immune system. A recent study showed that within 15-minutes of eating a predominantly carbohydrate meal (pizza, pasta, etc) the leukocyte index (the number of pathogens a white blood cell can destroy in 1-hour) fell from the normal 16 to 1.9, and maintained that lower level for many hours afterwards. That means a reduction to 10% of normal immune capacity for several hours.

A century ago sugar was a delicacy, and the average person consumed 5 pounds of sugar per year. Today in the US people consume an average of 150 pounds of sugar per person per year.

Cancer cells have certain characteristics – they only survive on sugar (glucose); they are anaerobic (do not need or thrive in an oxygenated environment); and they thrive in an acidic environment (as opposed to an alkaline environment).

Sugar contributes to free radical damage, damage to the mitochondria, and weakens our body’s innate immune system resulting in an environment where cancer cells can continue to grow and strengthen without being checked.

Normal cells go through a process called ‘oxidative phosphorylation’ which means they use oxygen and sugar and make 32 molecules of ATP (our body’s energy-currency). If cells use anaerobic metabolism (don’t utilize oxygen – i.e. cancer cells) they cannot produce 32 molecules of ATP, and perhaps produce only 2. That is the reason cancer cells with their altered metabolism need more sugar – so they can continue to produce some ATP for their own survival.

The anaerobic metabolism of cancer cells produces a lot of waste products, particularly lactic acid.

Reduce the intake of sugar (carbohydrate, glucose) and you will reduce the food supply of cancer cells, and reduce compromising your own immune system.

42%-46% of cancer patients die of cachexia (malnutrition). Conventional therapies for cancer don’t address this adequately.

Excessive sugar intake has been linked to increased risks of obesity, inflammation and chronic diseases. Chronic inflammation is one of the main contributing factors to many of the chronic diseases in our society today. It also is one of the causes of metastases of cancer that spreads throughout the body to form tumors.


Cells of the Immune System

The largest number of immune system cells in the body are neutrophils, representing from 50%-70% of your body’s army of immune cells. Neutrophils cannot detect cancer. Natural killer cells are constantly surveying all the cells in the body for intruders and other problem abnormal cells, and destroying them.

The immune system can be regarded as having two arms – specific and non-specific. In the non-specific arm there are neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils which are basically front-line defenders whose purpose is to identify all cells as belonging to self (i.e. friendlies). In the specific arm there are B-cells and T-cells. B-cells borne from the bone marrow, make antibodies against antigens, develop into memory B cells after activation by antigen interaction, and release cytokines (proteins), which are used for signaling immune regulatory functions. T-cells mature mainly in the thymus (some in the tonsils), and play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. There are several subsets of T-cells, each with a distinct function – including helper, cytotoxic, memory, regulatory (suppressor), and natural killer T-cells.

80% of your immune system is in the mucosal lining of our intestinal tract. If you don’t have a healthy intestinal tract and are feeding your body a lot of the wrong things it will compromise your immune system. If we add excessive burdens to our immune system it prevents it from doing its important function of protecting us.

In 1 cubic-centimeter of tumor there is approximately 1 billion cancer cells. 65% of those cells are usually dormant (in the resting phase of the cell cycle), and 35% are active (in the synthesis phase of the cell cycle).

99% of all cancer cells are non-cancer-stem-cells. Meaning about 1% of cancer cells are cancer-stem-cells. Cancer-stem-cells survive in the blood stream, are immortal, and not usually affected by chemotherapy and radiation. Non-cancerous stem cells cannot metastasize. Only cancer-stem-cells can metastasize. The immune system cannot recognize cancer-stem-cells because they have a protein on their cell surface that shields them from the immune system.

There is a small list of substances that have been shown scientifically to attack cancer-stem-cells. These include metformin and ellagic acid (found in berries and green tea extract).
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Becoming Your Best Cancer Care Advocate: 5 Steps Could Make All the Difference

Becoming Your Best Cancer Care Advocate: 5 Steps Could Make All the Difference | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
The steps taken just after diagnosis can have a huge impact on the quality of care we receive, as we try to both understand a disease as complex as cancer, and make smart decisions in navigating our complicated healthcare system....
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Fantastic tips for cancer survivors. Self-advocacy is SO important and such a big part of your wellbeing. What if you had a Care Plan that helped you reduce your stress so you had more energy to invest in advocating for you? What might be different?

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Tambre Leighn - Tambre's Tips on Engaging Patients | TheONC | A Gated Community for Oncology Nurses and Cancer Care Teams

Tambre Leighn - Tambre's Tips on Engaging Patients | TheONC | A Gated Community for Oncology Nurses and Cancer Care Teams | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Certified life coach Tambre Leighn offers guidance on how to engage patients to help improve patient care.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Check out my latest post for oncology nurses along with other great blog posts by oncology professionals available on this site.

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Mean girls and scared boys: The real life Australian The Fault in Our Stars ... - NEWS.com.au

Mean girls and scared boys: The real life Australian The Fault in Our Stars ... - NEWS.com.au | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
THERE’S a lot to worry about when you’re 14 and told you’re going to die.

Via Beth A. Williams
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Exactly why organizations like Young Survival Coalition (http://www.youngsurvival.org/) and Stupid Cancer (http://stupidcancer.org/) are SO important. Registration is open for YSC Conference for young women dealing with breast cancer, March 2015 in Houston and CancerCon hits Denver in April 2015. Both events give young survivors a chance to get connected, educated, inspired, and have some fun in a judgment free environment. Please pass it on.

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Beth A. Williams's curator insight, November 18, 2:40 PM

The issues teenagers with cancer face differ from those that both children and adults face. A place to share with others in similar situations can provide respite and a sense of community, and help to overcome isolation. 

 

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New Study Suggests Meditation Can Actually Alter Your Body On A Cellular Level | IFLScience

New Study Suggests Meditation Can Actually Alter Your Body On A Cellular Level | IFLScience | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Scientists aren’t quite sure how the placebo effect works. This phenomenon occurs when a patient believes they are getting treatment and their condition begins to improve, despite not actually receiving medication with an active ingredient.

Via Beth A. Williams
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Since most people are well aware, thanks to coloring each month of the year in a different hue, how about moving, instead to actionable steps - like Meditation Month - where everyone commits to meditating daily in an experiment to see how it changes their lives - 30 days to a new healthy habit. Let's move awareness to action and improving lifestyle choices. Time to stop talking about health and instead BE health!

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Beth A. Williams's curator insight, November 11, 1:27 PM

This study provides some confirmation of my belief that mindfulness, meditation, yoga and similar activities can significantly improve both the quality of life and length of life. Looking forward to more science looking at the health benefits of these activities.

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Click here to support IV Pediatric Backpack for KidsWithCancer by Kelly Simonds

Click here to support IV Pediatric Backpack for KidsWithCancer by Kelly Simonds | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
The Doctors tv show Kylie on MSNBC NewsNation with Tamron Hall. Sept. 22, 2014 Thank you msg from Kylie. All donations in excess of my goal will go towards the manufacturing of the FIRST usable IV backpacks. EVERY PENNY! Kylie NEEDS funding to create a WORKING Prototype! Kylie is 11 yrs old...
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Can you help Kylie? This amazing pediatric cancer survivor has a great invention to help other kids with cancer. Healthcare professionals, she is looking for specific information about IV pumps and other ambulatory pumps/take home pumps being used in children's hospitals around the country. Please pass it on and help either with a donation as little as $5 or with information.

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24 Straightforward Rules from Patients to Doctors - WhatNext

24 Straightforward Rules from Patients to Doctors - WhatNext | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
If patients could make the rules, what would they tell their doctors? Here are 24 rules from WhatNexters to their doctors.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Not just for cancer survivors...this list applies to all who are under the care of a physician or medical team. Sometimes what creates patient engagement and satisfaction is very, very simple.

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A Youthful Approach to Breast Cancer Prevention

A Youthful Approach to Breast Cancer Prevention | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Breast cancer prevention should begin during childhood and adolescence, targeting lifestyle factors.

Via Heather Swift
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Prevention - from childhood - can be the first line of defense for a large percentage of contributing factors.

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MacMullan: Schilling not hiding his scars

After bankruptcy and battle with cancer, Curt Schilling is not hiding his scars.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Do not dip...just don't.

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Anne Loeser: Reverse trends about breast cancer

Anne Loeser: Reverse trends about breast cancer | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it

"Imagine that you have an acquaintance in Springfield, Massachusetts, a city best known as the birthplace of basketball and home of the Basketball Hall of Fame. The fourth largest city in New England, Springfield boasts 155,000 residents of various ethnicities and religious beliefs.

Now envision that over the next five years, 120,900 (78 percent) of Springfield’s citizens pass away, and only 3,100 (2 percent) survive a normal life span.

In the event of such a situation, you’d expect considerable media coverage and public outrage. But the deaths continue mostly unnoticed.

If you believe such a circumstance to be unthinkable, think again.

Including myself, an estimated 155,000 Americans — the population of Springfield, — are living with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). MBC is cancer that has traveled from the breast and underarm lymph nodes to other parts of the body. Although we're in the midst of October's Breast Cancer Awareness Month (BCAM), you may not be aware that:

• 98 percent of people with MBC will die of it, and 78 percent will perish within five years of diagnosis.

• Average survival with MBC is three years.

• The number of women dying annually hasn’t varied since the mid-1980s when BCAM was initiated. In 1988, approximately 40,000 women perished and in 2011, 40,931 women died of MBC.

• Each year, roughly 220,097 women and 2,078 men are diagnosed with breast cancer, with no improvement in 10 years."


Via Susan Zager
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Realities far beyond the pink...

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Susan Zager's curator insight, October 20, 3:01 PM

This article really shows the true facts about metastatic breast cancer. 

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Truth Teller | A Woman's Health - Women Magazine

Truth Teller | A Woman's Health - Women Magazine | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
Tambre Leighn's insight:

One of my favorite survivor bloggers. Sharing her story has made a very challenging road much easier for others...in knowing they are not alone. #inspiration

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Finding The Light Before The End Of The Tunnel

Finding The Light Before The End Of The Tunnel | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
"Cured" is not necessarily the opposite of cancer. It is not the end we should necessarily be searching for. The opposite of cancer is life....
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Powerful article on stepping toward life instead of being defined by a diagnosis.

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7 Tips on Coping With Chemo Brain - WhatNext

7 Tips on Coping With Chemo Brain - WhatNext | Cancer Survivorship | Scoop.it
There are always questions on the site about that annoying thing we like to call "chemo brain." Here are a few more tips on what you can try if you are experiencing chemo brain, memory fog, or other mind-related side effects from chemotherapy or other cancer treatment.
Tambre Leighn's insight:

Some excellent strategies...but number one thing to address is stress. Stress has a huge impact on our ability to focus, make clear decisions, create and complete our task list, and more.

 

I find practical tips like these 7 can be used to support stress reduction but according to this study, http://ecancer.org/news/3621.php,

“Our initial findings showed that the level of worry interfered with patients’ ability to do a task,” Cimprich said. “The level of worry had a key role in the cognitive problems with these women before treatment, and this worry was related to fatigue.”


So reducing stress and worry, and paying attention to getting enough sleep are also additional strategies that may help.

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