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Patentholder on Breast Cancer Tests Denied Injunction in Lawsuit

Patentholder on Breast Cancer Tests Denied Injunction in Lawsuit | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

"Myriad Genetics, which lost a closely watched Supreme Court case last year involving the patenting of genes, has suffered another setback in its efforts to protect its main genetic test from competition.

A federal judge on Monday denied Myriad’s request for a preliminary injunction that would have immediately stopped a rival company, Ambry Genetics, from offering a similar test.

Myriad’s lucrative monopoly on testing for mutations in two genes linked to breast cancer risk was shattered last June by the Supreme Court’s ruling that genes were not eligible for patents because they were products of nature.

Several laboratory companies, including Ambry, quickly began offering tests, in most cases undercutting the $4,000 Myriad charged for a full analysis of the two genes, which are known as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Ambry announced a price of $2,200.

Myriad sued most of these companies, contending their tests infringed other patent claims that were not invalidated by the Supreme Court.

 

But Judge Robert J. Shelby of the United States District Court in Salt Lake City said in an opinion on Monday that Ambry had raised “substantial questions” concerning whether those remaining claims were eligible for patents. He said therefore that Myriad had not established that it was likely to succeed in the case on the merits of its arguments, which is a legal requirement to win a preliminary injunction.

The upshot is that Ambry can continue to offer its test pending the outcome of a trial or a settlement, said Dr. Robert M. Cook-Deegan, a research professor at Duke University who has closely followed the case and the issue of gene patents.

Charles Dunlop, chief executive of Ambry, called the ruling “a victory for the entire genetics community.” He said in a statement that Myriad’s lawsuit, after last year’s Supreme Court decision, “was a blatant attempt to maintain a monopoly state. We idealistically stood by our convictions throughout this process and are exhilarated by today’s ruling.”

Ronald Rogers, a spokesman for Myriad, said Myriad looked forward to presenting its case in court. Monday’s ruling, he said in an email, “is a denial of the preliminary injunction only” and “isn’t a ruling on the underlying merits of the case.” 


Via Susan Zager
Heather Swift's insight:

[BRCA]

 

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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 13, 2014 4:09 PM

Myriad Genetics was denied an injunction against Ambry Genetics from offering the BRCA gene test for less money. Myriad has also tried to stop other companies but for now the other companies are winning and offering the test for less. Ambry announced a price of $2,200, for a full analysis of the two genes, which are known as BRCA1 and BRCA2, undercutting the $4,000 Myriad charged.

Cancer Research You can Trust
Not all Research is Created Equal!
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Suspected research fraud: difficulties of getting at the truth

How credible is this article about suspected research fraud? Seems fair but vendetta?
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The DNA damage response goes viral: A way in for new cancer treatments

The DNA damage response goes viral: A way in for new cancer treatments | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Every organism must protect its DNA at all costs, but precisely how a cell distinguishes between damage to its own DNA and the foreign DNA of an invading virus has remained a mystery.
Now, scient ...
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Fatigue as a result of radiation; can psychological therapy help? - Medivizor

Fatigue as a result of radiation; can psychological therapy help? - Medivizor | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

Share In a nutshell The authors aimed to determine whether psychological therapy could relieve patients with fatigue (extreme tiredness) who are undergoing breast cancer radiation (uses high energy radiation to kill cancer cells by damaging their...


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New tool will compare costs versus benefits of cancer treatments

New tool will compare costs versus benefits of cancer treatments | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
As options for cancer patients become increasingly complicated, and expensive, the most influential source for U.S. oncology treatment guidelines will for the first time offer a tool to assess the costs versus benefits of available therapies.
Heather Swift's insight:

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has developed a tool to assess the price, effectiveness, safety, quality and consistency of clinical evidence of drugs for multiple myeloma and chronic myeloid leukemia. NCCN said it will launch the tool in October and will follow-up with tools for other cancers.

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Cancer-Detecting Dogs Sniff Out Samples

Cancer-Detecting Dogs Sniff Out Samples | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
UC Davis researchers are harnessing the power of dogs’ innate sense of smell to detect cancer, especially at early stages of the disease. The team are training two puppies, each about 4 months old —Alfie, a Labradoodle and Charlie, a German Shepherd — who are undergoing a rigorous 12-month training program to develop their abilities to detect the scent of cancer in samples of saliva, breath and urine.

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Doubt Is Raised Over Value of Surgery for Breast Lesion at Earliest Stage

Doubt Is Raised Over Value of Surgery for Breast Lesion at Earliest Stage | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Almost all women given a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ, considered a possible precursor to breast cancer, have a lumpectomy or mastectomy, but data show they may not benefit.
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Risk Assessment Identifies Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer

Risk Assessment Identifies Women at High Risk for Breast Cancer | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium BCSC risk model, combined with benign breast disease BBD diagnoses acurrately estimated womens risk.
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Why Oncologists Lag on Palliative Care

Why Oncologists Lag on Palliative Care | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

"It has been more than two years since the American Society of Clinical Oncology published its provisional clinical opinion (PCO) on early palliative care, which says that “combined standard oncology care and palliative care should be considered early in the course of illness for any patient with metastatic cancer and/or high symptom burden” (which I wrote about in OT’s 3/25/12 issue).

 

But oncologists are not all on board. As shown in an Early Release article in the Journal of Oncology Practice, research conducted at three cancer centers that have well-established outpatient palliative care clinics found that 22 of the 74 medical oncologists interviewed believe that palliative care is an alternative to chemotherapy, rather than complementary care.

 

The interviews were conducted in 2012; the ASCO Board of Directors approved the PCO in November 2011 and published it in February 2012. (Click here to hear Thomas J. Smith, MD, Director of Palliative Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, discuss ASCO’s decision to issue the PCO.)

 

 


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Study Finds Two Metastatic Breast Cancer Treatment Combinations Work Similarly Well

Study Finds Two Metastatic Breast Cancer Treatment Combinations Work Similarly Well | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Living Beyond Breast Cancer -- LBBC connects people with trusted breast cancer information and a community of support.
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Study Finds Two Metastatic Breast Cancer Treatment Combinations Work Similarly Well
Researchers looked at two past studies on how well the chemotherapy medicines gemcitabine (Gemzar) and capecitabine (Xeloda) work when each one is paired with another chemotherapy medicine called docetaxel (Taxotere). They found that the two combinations worked similarly well, but people who took the capecitabine-docetaxel combo were more likely to stop their therapy because of side effects.

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Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk

Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer Risk | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

Genetic testing for breast cancer risk including BRCA1 and 2 as well as less common mutations such as PTEN, TP53, CHEK2 and ATM.


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Clinical Oncology News - Massimo Cristofanilli, MD: How I Manage My Luminal A and Luminal B Breast Cancers

Clinical Oncology News - Massimo Cristofanilli, MD: How I Manage My Luminal A and Luminal B Breast Cancers | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

"Women with relatively low-risk breast cancer have more options today than in the past decade, due in large part to novel genomic and genetic tests. These tests have demonstrated the ability to predict cancers that are more aggressive and more likely to recur. Although genetic tests for heritable mutations to genes including BRCA1 and 2 have become more commonplace, genomic tests for identifying which cancer-related genes are over- or underproduced are still relatively rare in clinical practice.

Sometimes called genomic, mole- cular, or gene-expression analysis, these tests are most useful in stratifying patients with breast cancer into disease subtypes. This is particularly useful in cases of hormone receptor (HR)-positive or luminal-type disease, which can be further stratified into the cancer subtypes luminal A and luminal B. These 2 subtypes frequently are grouped because the cancers often can be treated successfully for many years with hormone-blocking therapies. Luminal A cancers generally are characterized as those that express high levels of the estrogen receptor (ER) and the progesterone receptor (PR), as well as low levels of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is involved in signaling cell proliferation (Figure). Luminal B cancers generally are more aggressive and more likely to recur than luminal A cancers. Luminal B cancers also are hormone-positive, but they are highly proliferative and may have high levels of HER2, making them candidates for trastuzumab (Herceptin, Genentech/Roche).

Is chemotherapy necessary for every patient?

Definitely not. Physicians are beginning to realize that some breast cancers have a very low likelihood of becoming life-threatening. Women today can make an educated decision about the right treatment course, considering how taxing chemotherapy can be and its short and long-term adverse events (AEs).


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Rebuilding the Breast

Rebuilding the Breast | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

From stem cells to 3D-printed nipples, breast reconstruction is a highly technical and constantly evolving field.

In 1882 an American surgeon named William Steward Halsted popularized what’s now called the radical mastectomy. He didn’t think of the idea—one of the first written proposals for a mastectomy was published by a German surgeon in 1719. But it was Halsted who made invasive removal of breast tissue a mainstream part of cancer treatment, and his version of the surgery involved removing the entire breast, along with the nearby lymph nodes and both pectoral muscles. Removing that much tissue at that period of time, before many of the surgical techniques doctors are now familiar with were developed, often left women severely disfigured.

And with the removal of breasts, or pieces of them, came the demand for cosmetic replacements. In 1874 the U.S. Patent Office issued its first patent for a breast prosthetic, to a man named Frederick Cox. The prosthetic was made up of a cotton casing filled with an inflatable breast pad."

In the following years, women would come to dominate the world of breast replacement patents. In 1904, a woman named Laura Wolfe filed a patent for an “artificial breast pad.” Her version was solid, rather than inflatable, and in her patent she described the three things a woman wanted out of a replacement breast: comfort, appearance, and product quality."

 


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As death nears, chemotherapy may do more harm than good

As death nears, chemotherapy may do more harm than good | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
It's been documented that many terminal cancer patients don't benefit from chemotherapy and other types of treatments toward the end of their lives. Nonetheless, many, with their doctors, opt to continue treatment -- faced with impossible choices, they hold on to hope that treatment might buy some time, or improve the quality of the days they have left.

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Is ER the new HER2 (which used to be the new ER)? Drs Lisa Carey and Eric Winer elaborate

Is ER the new HER2 (which used to be the new ER)? Drs Lisa Carey and Eric Winer elaborate | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

The very first educational video our CME group produced — entitled “Hormonal Manipulation for the 1980s” — featured a homemade animation from the nascent University of Miami audiovisual department depicting the mechanism of action of tamoxifen complete with side-by-side Pac-Man-like images of the drug and an estrogen molecule scooting across the cell membrane and racing to the nucleus to bind with a reverse-Pac-Man-looking estrogen receptor.

Back then this biology was very cool, and although we welcomed aromatase inhibitors (AIs) and fulvestrant to clinical practice, for a long time thereafter it seemed like there wasn’t much progress beyond this primitive concept of the very first form of targeted treatment of cancer. Instead the new target on the block, HER2, was generating considerably more interest as dashing figures like Dr Dennis Slamon regaled us with impressive science and trial results to match.

It was only in 2011 that research on endocrine treatment began to awaken from its long slumber, when data from the Phase III BOLERO-2 study demonstrated an impressive progression-free survival (PFS) hazard rate (HR) of 0.36 with the addition of the mTOR inhibitor everolimus to exemestane in patients with ER-positive advanced disease. Unfortunately, the toxicity of this agent, particularly mucositis, somewhat dulled our collective enthusiasm.



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Top Takeaways from ASCO: Survivorship

Top Takeaways from ASCO: Survivorship | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
CHICAGO — In forums including a data-driven plenary and a special educational session, attendees of ASCO 2015 gathered to discuss Top Takeaways on survivorship in pediatric and adult cancer.Results from a late-breaking abstract offered clinicians evidence on the improvements, both in quantity and quality of life, that childhood cancer survivors stand to gain through careful monitoring and

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Cancer cells programmed back to normal by US scientists - Telegraph.co.uk

Cancer cells programmed back to normal by US scientists - Telegraph.co.uk | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Scientists have turned cancerous cells back to normal by switching back on the process which stops normal cells from replicating too quickly
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Clinical Trials 2.0: Reinventing Research For The Social Age

Clinical Trials 2.0: Reinventing Research For The Social Age | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Clinical research is changing. No longer the sole preserve of clinicians and researchers, the Internet and new digital technologies are reinventing the way in which patients take part in the clinical trials process.

In the past decade there has been a revolution in how patients access health information. The Internet is increasingly the first ...

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Defeating breast cancer through crowdsourcing

Defeating breast cancer through crowdsourcing | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
A California software company, YourScan.org, has put out a call to women who have had to face the difficult diagnosis of breast cancer...
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One drink a day increases the risk of breast cancer by 15 per cent

One drink a day increases the risk of breast cancer by 15 per cent | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Women have been warned that just one glass of wine a day could significantly increase their risk of breast cancer
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UK's Telegraph headlined that one drink a day increased women's risk of breast cancer enough to prompt Harvard researchers to recommend women with a family history of the disease reduce their consumption. 

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Breast cancer vaccine is 'huge discovery' that brings hope to thousands of women

Breast cancer vaccine is 'huge discovery' that brings hope to thousands of women | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it

A breast cancer vaccine could be on the way to tackle a form of the illness that does not respond to common treatments


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Tell-tale biomarker detects early breast cancer in NIH-funded study

Tell-tale biomarker detects early breast cancer in NIH-funded study | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Researchers have shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect the earliest signs of breast cancer recurrence and fast-growing tumors.
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Paradigm, TME Research Sign Deal to Build Breast Cancer Genomic Registry

Paradigm, TME Research Sign Deal to Build Breast Cancer Genomic Registry | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Paradigm will use its next-generation sequencing-based test and other technologies to genomically characterize invasive breast cancer patients.

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Study: Chemo doesn't help end-stage cancer patients

Study: Chemo doesn't help end-stage cancer patients | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
A new study finds that half of cancer patients received chemotherapy in their final months of life, even though the therapy – which can cause nausea, vomiting and other grueling side effects – had no chance of curing them.
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Hospital Marketers Focus on Data, Social Media

Hospital Marketers Focus on Data, Social Media | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Using social media, web technologies and data analytics, healthcare marketing professionals can engage current patients, future patients, and the broader community in ways like never before.

Via C. Todd Livengood
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"'The good news is that as hospital marketing needs have evolved over the past few years, marketing professionals have done a good job at keeping up with changing skills needs,' according to Jill McDonald Halsey, chief marketing officer at Lawrence General Hospital in Medford, Massachusetts."

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C. Todd Livengood's curator insight, July 28, 9:13 AM

"'The good news is that as hospital marketing needs have evolved over the past few years, marketing professionals have done a good job at keeping up with changing skills needs,' according to Jill McDonald Halsey, chief marketing officer at Lawrence General Hospital in Medford, Massachusetts."

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Could one-two punch of generics for breast cancer be more powerful than wonder drug tamoxifen?

Could one-two punch of generics for breast cancer be more powerful than wonder drug tamoxifen? | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
A study in The Lancet found that an existing class of drug could not only reduce recurrence rates but risk of death.

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How a Bunch of Scrappy Marines Could Help Vanquish Breast Cancer

How a Bunch of Scrappy Marines Could Help Vanquish Breast Cancer | Cancer Research You can Trust | Scoop.it
Exposed to poisoned water at Camp Lejeune, these vets may hold the key to a scourge that kills some 40,000 American women—and a few hundred men—per year.

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