Cancer Research
46 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

National Survey on Cancer Research Funding

National Survey on Cancer Research Funding | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Stefanie Charles's insight:

In conjunction with the publication of its fifth annual Cancer Progress Report, the American Association for Cancer Research commissioned a national survey on cancer and cancer research funding. Among the findings: 74% of U.S. voters favor increasing federal funding for cancer research. Voters' support is bipartisan. #CancerProgress15

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

The Ins & Outs of Promoting Your Own Research on Social Media

In the “old days,” you performed your research, wrote up your study, submitted it to a peer-reviewed journal, and felt a sense of accomplishment if the study was accepted and a printed copy landed in your mailbox some months later. If you were lucky, the media would catch wind of it and your findings would be shared with a broader audience. But times have changed, studies published in medical journals now typically appear online first, and myriad social media platforms are opening up new opportunities to share research results. The conundrum, though, is how to best use those platforms?

Stefanie Charles's insight:

Interesting insight for researchers considering promoting their work on social media, via Oncology Times

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Q&A With Lee Helman, MD, on New Cancer Targets and Therapeutics - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

Q&A With Lee Helman, MD, on New Cancer Targets and Therapeutics - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
The National Cancer Institute’s Lee Helman, MD, co-chair of the EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, discusses what to expect this year, and peers into the future of targeted cancer therapies and immunotherapy.
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Q&A with Lee Helman, MD, senior investigator in the Pediatric Oncology Branch at the National Cancer Institute and co-chair of the EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Physicians 'vital' in explaining smoking and bladder cancer link

Physicians 'vital' in explaining smoking and bladder cancer link | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
A new study has identified physicians as key when it comes to explaining how tobacco use can cause bladder cancer, and they could help cancer survivors quit smoking.
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Only 25-36% of the U.S. population is aware of the tobacco-bladder cancer link.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

From the Journals: Cigars Can Harm Just Like Cigarettes - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

From the Journals: Cigars Can Harm Just Like Cigarettes  - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
According to a new report in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, the levels of several toxic substances are elevated in cigar smokers, and for at least one potent cancer-causing agent, ...
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Daily cigar smoking can be just as harmful as daily cigarette smoking, according to a recent study from the U.S. FDA and published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Cancer Genomics: Using Big Data to Advance Breast Cancer Risk Prediction - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

Cancer Genomics: Using Big Data to Advance Breast Cancer Risk Prediction - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
A study shows big data can be exploited to develop effective breast cancer prevention strategies; NIH unveils an initiative to harness biomedical big data.
Stefanie Charles's insight:

A look at recent developments and future plans for big data in cancer research, from Cancer Research Catalyst, the blog of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Bristol immunotherapy shows encouraging survival in lung cancer trial - Reuters

Bristol immunotherapy shows encouraging survival in lung cancer trial - Reuters | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
(Reuters) - Treatment of a common form of advanced lung cancer with Bristol-Myers Squibb Co's experimental immunotherapy nivolumab led to a one-year survival rate of 41 percent in a midstage clinical...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stefanie Charles from MRC research in the news
Scoop.it!

Researchers identify new target for treating childhood cancers - Science Xpress

Researchers identify new target for treating childhood cancers - Science Xpress | Cancer Research | Scoop.it

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have uncovered a new target for drugs that could battle a lethal childhood cancer known as neuroblastoma.


Via MRC press office
Stefanie Charles's insight:

This study was published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

more...
MRC press office's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:26 AM

Valeria Solari, who led the research funded by an MRC Fellowship, said: "Our findings could be exploited in the development of new drugs for neuroblastoma to complement existing treatments."

OncoDNA's curator insight, October 27, 2014 4:58 PM

(Medical Xpress)—Scientists at the University of Liverpool have uncovered a new target for drugs that could battle a lethal childhood cancer known as neuroblastoma.


Neuroblastoma is one of the deadliestchildhood cancers, causing 15% of all paediatric cancer deaths. The majority of sufferers have incurable disease, which has often spread throughout the body when first diagnosed.

Over the past 20 years, long-term survival has improved but children still receive very harsh treatments that not only kill tumour cells but also normal cells. As for many cancers, treatments for neuroblastoma are not specific and patients have limited ability to tolerate such toxic therapies.

Gene signatures

It has been known for some years that certain sub-classes of neuroblastoma cancers express gene 'signatures' associated with very aggressive tumour behaviour such as rapid growth and spread.

Scientists at the University's Institute of Integrative Biology at have now discovered that an enzyme protein called sulfatase 2 (Sulf2) is linked to this high-risk cancer-promoting gene signature.

Significantly they showed that lowering the amounts of Sulf2 in human cancer cellsstrongly reduced their ability to form tumours. Sulf2 is responsible for modifying sulphated sugars called heparan sulphates, found on the surface of cells. They play crucial roles in controlling cell functions, including promoting cell growth and preventing cell death.

New therapies needed

The research, supported by a Medical Research Council (MRC) PhD Fellowship, shows that it could be possible to inhibit this enzyme, potentially slowing or preventing the growth of some neuroblastomas.

Valeria Solari, who led the research as part of the MRC Fellowship, said: "High-risk neuroblastoma is still very difficult to treat and in order to make improvements, we urgently need new therapies.

"Our findings could be exploited in the development of new drugs for neuroblastoma to complement existing treatments."

Real potential

Professor Jerry Turnbull, who supervised the Liverpool project, said: "Neuroblastoma is a devastating condition for the affected children and their parents.

"Our research has found that this Sulf enzyme is a key player in making the high-risk forms of neuroblastoma difficult to treat."

Dr Ed Yates, co-supervisor of the project, added: "The exciting thing about this work is that we now have a new drug development target that has real potential since it is found outside the cancer cells and is accessible to chemical inhibitors.

"We hope that further work will open up new opportunities for treatment of this childhood cancer."


The research is published in the journal Cancer Research.



Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Here’s How Well Your Genes Can Predict Your Breast Cancer Risk

Here’s How Well Your Genes Can Predict Your Breast Cancer Risk | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Researchers say genetic sequencing can predict breast cancer risk better than previously thought
Stefanie Charles's insight:

This study was published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

The Weight of Obesity on Cancer Patients - Cancer Today

The Weight of Obesity on Cancer Patients - Cancer Today | Cancer Research | Scoop.it

Overweight and obese patients face worse side effects and survival odds than others with the same cancer. New efforts aim to help them get better care, become healthier and live longer.

Stefanie Charles's insight:

An increasing number of cancer patients are obese at diagnosis, which can lead to worse survival rates, increased risk of cancer recurrence, and more side effects.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

How Donating Healthy Tissue Today Can Help Beat Breast Cancer Tomorrow - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

How Donating Healthy Tissue Today Can Help Beat Breast Cancer Tomorrow - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Since 2007, nearly 4,000 women have donated breast tissue samples to the Komen Tissue Bank at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center.
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Anna Maria Storniolo, MD, Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, explains how the Komen Tissue Bank is allowing scientists to study healthy tissue so they can better understand breast cancer. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

A Youthful Approach: Expanding the Reach of Breast Cancer Prevention - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

A Youthful Approach: Expanding the Reach of Breast Cancer Prevention - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Guest Post by Graham A. Colditz, MD, DrPH
Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Cancer Research Catalyst guest blogger Graham A. Colditz explains the importance of starting breast cancer prevention habits in childhood. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Obesity Increases Cancer Risk and May Affect Treatment - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

Obesity Increases Cancer Risk and May Affect Treatment - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
With the easy availability of plentiful, inexpensive, and often unhealthy food, many of us work hard to avoid packing on the pounds. But our vigilance can waver, as seen in ...
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Insight on the obesity-cancer connection, from Cancer Research Catalyst the blog of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR). 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

AACR Cancer Progress Report 2015

AACR Cancer Progress Report 2015 | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Research is driving cancer progress. The AACR Cancer Progress Report captures the breadth and depth of advances that have brought us to the current inflection point in the cancer field. The report serves as an educational document for both Congress and the public. It is also a call to action, designed to urge Congress and the American public to stand firm in their commitment to the conquest of cancer. #CancerProgress15

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

On the Road to Better Pancreatic Cancer Treatments - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

On the Road to Better Pancreatic Cancer Treatments - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it

Costas Lyssiotis, PhD, a 2013 Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Pathway to Leadership Grant recipient, is conducting research to understand the unique metabolism of pancreatic tumors and discover new therapeutic targets that can exploit the dependency of these tumors on the nutrients that fuel their growth.

Stefanie Charles's insight:

For Pancreatic Cancer Awareness Month, the AACR's Cancer Research Catalyst blog profiles a pancreatic cancer researcher and Pancreatic Cancer Action Network-AACR Pathway to Leadership Grant recipient.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Caring For a Loved One During Chemotherapy

Caring For a Loved One During Chemotherapy | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Taking care of a loved one as they undergo chemotherapy might seem like a daunting task. The information below will guide you through some of the basics, so you can help give the best possible care to the person you love.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

It’s lung cancer awareness month

It’s lung cancer awareness month | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
November is lung cancer awareness month, so we've pulled together key information about the disease and what we’re doing to improve survival.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Advancing Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

Advancing Immunotherapy for Lung Cancer - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Lung cancer awareness month started hot on the heels of two exciting pieces of news that highlight the promise of immunotherapy as a treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), ...
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Insights into new research on lung cancer immunotherapy, from Cancer Research Catalyst, the AACR's new blog

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stefanie Charles from Social Media and Healthcare
Scoop.it!

Social Media and Cancer Patients

Social Media and Cancer Patients | Cancer Research | Scoop.it

Social media that connects me with other people with cancer—especially the specific cancers I have dealt with—has been a godsend to me. In 1996, when I was diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL)—a disease I had never heard of—it was other patients on the original ACOR.org listserv that connected me with an expert in my condition and gave me emotional support. That connection saved my life, because I learned about an important clinical trial and was put in touch with other “list members” who were already in the trial that was proposed for me. They encouraged me to enter; I did; and here I am today. That was a “win.” And since then, there have been many others. I have enjoyed wonderful virtual relationships with so many caring people. In 2011, when I was diagnosed with myelofibrosis, I joined more groups, and they have been terrific for me, too.

But I have felt pain in online social media, too. And lately, in the groups I follow, there has been a lot. As much as I am thrilled to bring people stories of promising research, breakthrough new treatments, new ways to limit side effects, and stories of people living well, the fact is cancer is serious, serious business—and there are losses all too often. And between the wins and losses, there can be hope, even confidence, but there can be uncertainty, too. Right now, some of my fellow group members are reeling from the losses—a father, a mother, a husband, a wife. While their suffering is over, we suffer the loss and are angered that it happened. Now we mourn as a virtual group.

But even in that time of pain, support springs anew from the four corners of the world. It is a very cool phenomenon. People whose bond is sometimes a condition that’s even hard to spell correctly connect on a very human level over today’s social media.  ACOR, HealthUnlocked, Facebook’s open and closed groups, Yahoo groups, direct messages on Twitter, and many other places, too. We are blessed that this electronic connection is possible.

Soon Patient Power will be piloting a new approach, first in CLL. We call it “Patient Café™”. The idea is to give maybe 10 to 12 people at a time the chance to meet on live video online, facilitated by an experienced patient leader. In CLL, Carol Preston, on behalf of the Patient Empowerment Network, will lead our effort. This will enable people who have never met anyone else with the condition to very comfortably have “coffee” with others. We will keep you informed as this rolls out and as we expand it. So please be signed up for alerts on our website, so you’ll know as this develops.

But the bottom line is social media brings us highs—and lately, some deep lows. However, it also gives us a community worldwide for the good times and the not so good. My dream is the celebrations of better health will increase and the losses will diminish. Thanks to all of you who join me in one of these groups. Many of us have connected directly, and my heart has been touched because of you.

Wishing you and your family the best of health!

 


Via Plus91
more...
Amanda Wall's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:03 PM

This article is stating that social media can not only be used to update status' and post photos but to also communicate with people on a personal level. One woman has found social media to be useful to contact and read stories from other people who have chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, survivors and their families who she can relate to and receive comfort. 

 

I especially like when they mention that connecting with people who you've never met before on social media is  just like "having a coffee" meaning they feel comfortable enough to exchange stories and experiences with cancer just by what they write in their blogs or other social media websites. Social media is more than hash tags and likes, most people don't realize that it can be used to comfort one another who share the same struggles as you. 

Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Overcoming Cancer Health Disparities to Make Progress for All - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

Overcoming Cancer Health Disparities to Make Progress for All - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Advances in cancer research have not benefited everyone equally. This post explains cancer health disparities and what is being done to address them.
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Highlights and updates on cancer health disparities research 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Progress Against Cancer: An Ongoing Goal That Needs Increased Federal Investment - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

Progress Against Cancer: An Ongoing Goal That Needs Increased Federal Investment - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
In follow up to the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014, AACR President Carlos L. Arteaga, MD, discusses recent FDA approvals that help cancer patients.
Stefanie Charles's insight:

AACR President Carlos Arteaga, MD, discusses the remarkable progress taking place in cancer research in the short time since the AACR Cancer Progress Report 2014 was published this September. 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Stefanie Charles from Brain Tumors
Scoop.it!

Reader Report: Lessons of surviving brain cancer

Reader Report: Lessons of surviving brain cancer | Cancer Research | Scoop.it

Seven years ago, when she was 50, Debbie's brain cancer was diagnosed. She was a scratch golfer, an avid skier, a sport fisherman and lover of all things outdoors. 


Via Pacific Cove
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Such an inspirational story about cancer survivorship 

more...
Pacific Cove's curator insight, October 23, 2014 8:16 PM

#BrainTumorThursday - Her name is Debbie Albright, and she is a seven-year brain tumor survivor. #BrainCancer #BrainTumor #BTSM

Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

Listen up, guys: You should get the HPV vaccine, too

Listen up, guys: You should get the HPV vaccine, too | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
Boys can get the disease (and related cancers) too. So why aren't we doing more to keep them safe?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

My Sister Has Breast Cancer: What Does That Mean for Me? - U.S. News & World Report

My Sister Has Breast Cancer: What Does That Mean for Me? - U.S. News & World Report | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
How you can look after her health – and yours.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Stefanie Charles
Scoop.it!

How Your Weight Affects Your Risk of Breast Cancer

How Your Weight Affects Your Risk of Breast Cancer | Cancer Research | Scoop.it
For women, being overweight or obese after menopause increases the risk of breast cancer .
Stefanie Charles's insight:

Information on the obesity-cancer connection.

more...
No comment yet.