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Rescooped by Hadriano Lacerda from Amazing Science
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Would you eat ‘eco-friendly’ meat created from stem cells?

Would you eat ‘eco-friendly’ meat created from stem cells? | cancer research | Scoop.it

Rising global demand for meat will result in increased environmental pollution, energy consumption, and animal suffering. Cultured meat, produced in an animal-cell cultivation process, is a technically feasible alternative lacking these disadvantages, provided that an animal-component-free growth medium can be developed. Small-scale production looks particularly promising, not only technologically but also for societal acceptance. Economic feasibility, however, emerges as the real obstacle.


In a paper in the Cell Press journal Trends in Biotechnology, Cor van der Weele of Wageningen University in The Netherlands and coauthor Johannes Tramper describe a potential meat manufacturing process, starting with a vial of cells taken from a cell bank and ending with a pressed cake of minced meat.

 

Cor van der Weele  point out that the rising demand for meat around the world is unsustainable in terms of environmental pollution and energy consumption, in addition to animal suffering associated with factory farming.

 

Fortunately, it’s already possible to make meat from stem cells, as demonstrated by  Mark Post, a professor of tissue engineering at Maastricht University who created the first lab-grown hamburger in 2013.

 

There will be challenges when it comes to maintaining a continuous stem cell line and producing cultured meat that’s cheaper than meat obtained in the usual way, they say.

 

However, “cultured meat has great moral promise,” write van der Weele and Tramper. “Worries about its unnaturalness might be met through small-scale production methods that allow close contact with cell-donor animals, thereby reversing feelings of alienation. From a technological perspective, ‘village-scale’ production is also a promising option.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Hadriano Lacerda from Breast Cancer News
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Mechanism behind breast cancer's spread revealed

Mechanism behind breast cancer's spread revealed | cancer research | Scoop.it

"Scientists have discovered that low oxygen conditions, which often persist inside tumours, are sufficient to initiate a molecular chain of events that transforms breast cancer cells from being rigid and stationery to mobile and invasive.

Gregg Semenza, M.D., Ph.D., the C. Michael Armstrong Professor of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, said that high levels of RhoA and ROCK1 were known to worsen outcomes for breast cancer patients by endowing cancer cells with the ability to move, but the trigger for their production was a mystery.

He said that they now know that the production of these proteins increases dramatically when breast cancer cells are exposed to low oxygen conditions.

To move, cancer cells must make many changes to their internal structures, Semenza said.

Thin, parallel filaments form throughout the cells, allowing them to contract and cellular "hands" arise, allowing cells to "grab" external surfaces to pull themselves along. The proteins RhoA and ROCK1 are known to be central to the formation of these structures.

Moreover, the genes that code for RhoA and ROCK1 were known to be turned on at high levels in human cells from metastatic breast cancers.

In a few cases, those increased levels could be traced back to a genetic error in a protein that controls them, but not in most. This activity, said Semenza, led him and his team to search for another cause for their high levels."


Via Susan Zager
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Researchers Fast-Forward Stem Cell Aging to Study Degenerative Diseases - Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (press release) (blog)

Researchers Fast-Forward Stem Cell Aging to Study Degenerative Diseases - Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (press release) (blog) | cancer research | Scoop.it
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (press release) (blog)
Researchers Fast-Forward Stem Cell Aging to Study Degenerative Diseases
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (press release) (blog)
... from stem cells.
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Behaviour and biology: The accidental epigeneticist - Nature.com

Behaviour and biology: The accidental epigeneticist - Nature.com | cancer research | Scoop.it
Nature.com Behaviour and biology: The accidental epigeneticist Nature.com He has joined researchers at McGill University in Montreal and the US National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, to investigate how nurturing or adverse...
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Rescooped by Hadriano Lacerda from Glossarissimo!
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‎(EN) - Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology | David M. Glick

‎(EN) - Glossary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology | David M. Glick | cancer research | Scoop.it

"Portland Press Ltd. is a not for profit organization wholly owned by the Biochemical Society. Academic publishers with extensive experience in publishing high-quality journals, membership magazines and books."


Via Stefano KaliFire
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Stefano KaliFire's curator insight, February 27, 2013 5:00 AM

 3,000+ definitions in 1996 paper edition (Yvonne Becker)

Estelblau's curator insight, November 6, 2014 11:28 AM

 3,000+ definitions in 1996 paper edition (Yvonne Becker)