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Rescooped by Liz Klipp from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope

Treating Kids' Cancer With Science And A Pocket Full Of Hope | Cancer  News | Scoop.it
Pediatric oncologist Jim Olson credits the inventiveness of his research to his young patients.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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Rescooped by Liz Klipp from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Side by Side, Battling Cancer and Sending Off the Bride

Side by Side, Battling Cancer and Sending Off the Bride | Cancer  News | Scoop.it
Nancy Borowick's parents were receiving chemotherapy together when she realized all she wanted on her wedding day was to have them both walk her down the aisle, together.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Faces of Breast Cancer: A Global Community

Faces of Breast Cancer: A Global Community | Cancer  News | Scoop.it

Whether you have breast cancer, love someone with breast cancer or worry about breast cancer, you are part of a global community of people whose lives have been touched by the disease.

Behind the statistics are the faces of the women and men whose lives have been touched by the disease. Some of them have breast cancer and are undergoing treatment or are now living life after cancer. Others love someone with breast cancer or have lost someone to the disease. And some have been told they have a high genetic risk of developing breast cancer, and they live with the daily fear and worry about a future with breast cancer.

To tell the stories of the people who make up this global breast cancer community, we are asking readers of The New York Times to share their experiences with breast cancer as part of Well’s “Picture Your Life” project. So far, we have received hundreds of submissions from readers around the world, with more coming in every day.


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Susan Zager's curator insight, October 15, 2013 5:45 PM

Many have shared their stories about breast cancer with the New York Times. Among them is my friend Grazia De Michele. Her story can be found here: http://www.nytimes.com/projects/your-breast-cancer-stories/?story=946


Tambre Leighn's curator insight, October 19, 2013 2:56 PM

Cancer doesn't disciminate...clearly illustrated in this post.

Rescooped by Liz Klipp from Breast Cancer News
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New Imaging Technique Can Identify Breast Cancer Subtypes and Early Treatment Response

New Imaging Technique Can Identify Breast Cancer Subtypes and Early Treatment Response | Cancer  News | Scoop.it

"PHILADELPHIA — An optical imaging technique that measures metabolic activity in cancer cells can accurately differentiate breast cancer subtypes, and it can detect responses to treatment as early as two days after therapy administration, according to a study published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.
“The process of targeted drug development requires assays that measure drug target engagement and predict the response (or lack thereof) to treatment,” said Alex Walsh, a graduate student in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn. “We have shown that optical metabolic imaging (OMI) enables fast, sensitive, and accurate measurement of drug action. Importantly, OMI measurements can be made repeatedly over time in a live animal, which significantly reduces the cost of these preclinical studies.”



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Susan Zager's curator insight, October 17, 2013 2:59 PM

Although this study used human breast calls in mice, the findings may use the OMI measurement technique in humans and reduce the cost of preclinical studies. “Cancer drugs have profound effects on cellular energy production, and this can be harnessed by OMI to identify responding cells from nonresponding cells,” said Walsh. “We are hoping to develop a high-throughput screening method to predict the optimal drug treatment for a particular patient.”
To see the abstract go to: http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/73/20/6164.abstract