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Rescooped by Julie Marker from PARP Inhibitors Cancer Review
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parp inhibitors for brca+ women with gynecological cancers

parp inhibitors for brca+ women with gynecological cancers | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it
PARP inhibitors prevent cancer cells from repairing themselves after experiencing DNA damage. Research has previously shown that veliparib is effective in combination with chemotherapy, but little data was available to ...

Via Krishan Maggon
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Sit less, move more: why Australia doubled its exercise guidelines

Sit less, move more: why Australia doubled its exercise guidelines | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it
Why are Australians being told to do twice as much exercise? You could be sitting on the answer. (Are you sitting down?
Julie Marker's insight:

Don't 'take it easy' ... move it!

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Cancer wars

Cancer wars | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it
As the big guns throw their weight behind "pink" charities, other killer cancers are being left behind in the race for funding.
Julie Marker's insight:

Bold article on the cancer charity industry.  Where does the money go, who really benefits and who decides priorities?  Lung cancer the biggest killer along with brain, ovarian and pancreatic cancers have seen scant progress in outcomes for decades.

 A picture tells the story.  Old data but best we've got is page 31 chart of funding x cancer mortality in Cancer Australia report   http://tinyurl.com/mp6tvzp ;  Food for thought!

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Rescooped by Julie Marker from eHealth - Social Business in Health
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Patients need to have control over their own information if care.data is to work

Patients need to have control over their own information if care.data is to work | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it
The consent process for opting out of care.data should be clear and transparent, and patients should be the first to have access, says Mohammad Al-Ubaydli

The case the government makes for care.data, that allowing medical researchers access to patient data will result in new cures, is a hard one to oppose. If the case were so simple then most people, including me, would welcome it.

The question that the care.data effort brings to light is a simple one – why has the NHS moved so quickly to provide patient medical records to third parties and so slowly to provide data to the patient themselves? For me, this is entirely the wrong way round.

The consent process for opting out of care.data is neither clear nor transparent. The questions page states that the record will not contain information that can identify a patient – and it's true that NHS number, postcode, full name etc will be removed. However, it's also true that each patient's record will be linked to a "meaningless pseudonym that bears no relationship to their 'real world' identity".

The information being shared by care.data is substantial. They exclude sexual health data, such as HIV diagnosis or abortions – but they include mental health data. They exclude written notes – but they include actual diagnoses, medications and laboratory results.

In addition, the records will be shared with third parties a patient might not want to have their data. HSCIC public assurance director Dr Mark Davies has already said that, in the eyes of the law, the government can't distinguish between a request by an insurance company and a medical researcher to access the database. For them, it makes no difference. But it makes a difference to the patient, who could, would and should distinguish. Indeed, at the moment the patient isn't even allowed to see data in their own record that third parties will have access to.

Government representatives repeat in interviews that they need to open a debate on care.data – so let's have the debate now while plans have come to a temporary halt. We know from other countries that a proper discussion on government-controlled data leads to different outcomes. ...

The government says that care.data can bring huge benefits. If so, it needs to prove what these benefits are and start by giving the patients themselves data about their own bodies.

Dr Mohammad Al'Ubaydli is the CEO and founder of Patients Know Best


Via rob halkes
Julie Marker's insight:

Australian patient don't have access to our own health data, diagnoses, medications, lab test results;  surely that is a fundamental right!  The PCEHR is the dream, not the reality of delivering this.

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rob halkes's curator insight, March 6, 2014 11:19 AM

National health record systems should be furthered by giving the patient first access to their information. First, because patients are best suited for checking those data for which they are the only right source for checking it, e.g. their medications: think about actual use. They are the sources for checking "actuality": what is actually being "used", "validity": is the right information given - does it represent what is "on" and what not, and "reliability" is everything in the right terms and details (doses for instance). That is the instrumental use of patient access, besides the principle use of it: patients ought to have insights in their formal data and functional use of it: by sharing same information and data the protagonists in care for patient's health can do a better job together for better health outcomes. ..


Mariló Maldonado's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:05 PM

Interesante artículo sobre el manejo de base de datos de pacientes de la Salud Pública británica (NHS)

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Is a world free from cancers probable, possible, or preposterous?

Is a world free from cancers probable, possible, or preposterous? | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it
A panel of leading health, economics and policy experts discussed the prospects for a future where cancers are rendered manageable or even eradicated and the variables affecting progress toward...
Julie Marker's insight:

Interesting title, to be sure!

 

Implement what we know works, research what we don't know, collaboration is the key, raise the priority of cancer at the individual, community, health system and national policy level.  The cost of cancer is enormous - too costly  NOT to do something.  These were the prescient key messages of the 2009 LIVESTRONG Global Cancer Summit, urging us to 'Imagine a world without cancer'. 

We can all do more than dream.

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Colorectal Cancer: How Emerging Molecular Understanding Affects Treatment Decisions | Cancer Network

Colorectal Cancer: How Emerging Molecular Understanding Affects Treatment Decisions | Cancer Network | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it
Julie Marker's insight:

Some of the emerging complexity is concisely described in a series of short articles.

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Wolters Kluwer Health

Julie Marker's insight:

Multidisciplinary cancer 'team' care and not fragmented care is surely beneficial, so why is it so hard to 'prove'?   How to measure 'teamwork' and 'seamless coordination' in complex cases where it likely can make a big difference in outcomes?  

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Instant Recess: 5-Minute Physical Activity Break

Instant Recess (formerly Lift-Off!) 5-Minute Physical Activity Break for Meetings and Events This 5-minute group physical activity break has been developed b...
Julie Marker's insight:

Every conference should have this daily session!

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Rescooped by Julie Marker from Cancer Survivorship
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Survivorship Is Not a Passive Sport | Cancer Network

Survivorship Is Not a Passive Sport | Cancer Network | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it

Patients often have astonishing drive and determination while on active treatment. But the new focus on survivorship is tricky.


Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
Julie Marker's insight:

'Over to you'.  What to do, how to do it, who is there to advise and monitor?

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Targeted treatment offers hope to cancer patients - Telegraph.co.uk

Targeted treatment offers hope to cancer patients - Telegraph.co.uk | cancer advocacy | Scoop.it
Shalom Life
Targeted treatment offers hope to cancer patients
Telegraph.co.uk
These stunning “before” and “after” scans of cancer patient Ian Brooks released by the Christie Hospital in Manchester last week, looked almost too good to be true.
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