Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments
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Agricultural Chemicals Linked to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

Agricultural Chemicals Linked to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

A report published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health has highlighted a positive link between the cancer ‘non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL)’ and chemicals used in agriculture.


The researchers systematically reviewed more than 25 years’ worth of epidemiologic literature across 12 countries on the relationship between pesticide chemical groups and active ingredients with NHL.

The findings included:
- Random effects meta-analyses showed that phenoxy herbicides, carbamate insecticides, organophosphorus insecticides and the active ingredient lindane, an organochlorine insecticide, were positively associated with NHL.
- Associations between pesticides and NHL subtypes.
- B cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicides and the organophosphorus herbicide glyphosate.
- Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was positively associated with phenoxy herbicide exposure.


Read the full report here - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4025008/

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Gene Therapy Experiment for Leukemia Successful

Gene Therapy Experiment for Leukemia Successful | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania remove "T cells" and genetically modify them to recognize and attack cancer cells
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

A gene therapy experiment designed to manipulate his immune system has proven successful in treating chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

Doctors at the University of Pennsylvania removed "T cells," or white blood cells that help fight infections, from a cancer patient suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. They then genetically modified the cells to recognize and attack cancer cells, and put the cells back into the patient’s body. After three weeks there was no of chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the patient’s blood.

"The T cell can grow and divide," says oncologist Dr. David Porter, who is part of the team overseeing the therapy. "In fact, we've seen for every T cell that we genetically modify and put into a patient's body, it has the ability to kill up to 93,000 leukemia cells."

In the next few months, doctors will start using this sophisticated immunotherapy in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

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