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Evidence Based Lifestyle and Self Help Strategies After Cancer

'Together Against Cancer' Conference October 2013. A PowerPoint presentation entitled "Evidence based lifestyle and self help strategies after Cancer". By Pr...
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

This is an informative presentation (46 mins) delivered by Professor Dr. Robert Thomas, a Consultant Oncologist at Addenbrooke's and Bedford Hospitals, a visiting Professor at Cranfield University and a clinical teacher at Cambridge University.

 

He talks about the benefits of lifestyle, exercise and diet in relation to cancer.

 

You may want to recommend to your doctor to watch this.

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s comment, April 13, 12:28 PM
The results of the UK NCRN Pomi-T study referred to by Professor Dr. Robert Thomas can be seen here published in Nature Magazine - http://www.nature.com/pcan/journal/v17/n2/full/pcan20146a.html
Tambre Leighn's curator insight, April 17, 11:16 AM

Yes, yes, yes...a pathway to wellbeing - nutritious food and physical activity!

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Exercise May Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Exercise May Lower Breast Cancer Risk | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Breaking a sweat does more for your body than just trim your waistline. Exercise may lower a woman's risk for breast cancer and researchers are finding out why. Scientists from the University of Minnesota in St.

Via Susan Zager
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

Scientists from the University of Minnesota studied a group of 179 women who received 30 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous exercise five times a week for over 16 weeks, and discovered changes in their estrogen metabolism that could explain the anti-cancer benefits of working out.

Aerobic exercise influences the way our bodies break down estrogens. Estrogen is a large contributing factor in breast cancer development.

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Susan Zager's curator insight, May 9, 2013 4:04 PM

There's been lots of studies linking exercise and breast cancer risk. I think exercise is good for us no mater what.

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Bowel Cancer in UK Men Increased 25%

Bowel Cancer in UK Men Increased 25% | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Male bowel cancer rates have increased by more than a quarter in 35 years - but the figure is much less for women, a Cancer Research study suggests. (#Male #bowel #cancer on the increase, says Cancer Research.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

The results of a UK study highlighted an increase of bowel cancer in men of 25% over the past 35 years. In contrast, bowel cancer in women over the same period increased by only 6%.

 

Perhaps obesity, diets high in red and processed meat, low fiber diets, and lack of exercise could be the culprits.

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Exercise is an Important Component of Cancer Treatment

Exercise is an Important Component of Cancer Treatment | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Exercise can help slash your risk of cancer, lessen risk of cancer recurrence, and also helps diminish your risk of dementia.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

Mounting research suggests that exercise is an important part of cancer care and prevention. The British organization Macmillan Cancer Support recommends that all patients getting cancer treatment should be told to engage in moderate-intensity exercise for two and a half hours every week, stating that the advice to rest and take it easy after treatment is an outdated view. Exercise also improves circulation, driving more oxygen into the tissues, and circulating immune cells in the blood.

Previous studies have shown that exercise can have a powerful effect on cancer care and recovery. For patients who have gone through breast or colon cancer treatment, regular exercise has been found to reduce recurrence of the disease by up to 50% (read more here - http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/249636.php ).

Professor Dr. Robert Thomas, a Consultant Oncologist at Addenbrooke's and Bedford Hospitals, a visiting Professor at Cranfield University and a clinical teacher at Cambridge University, comments that, in terms of cancer, exercise reduces the side effects of treatment, makes patients feel better, reduce risk of relapse, and improves the chance of living an overall healthy long life. Rest during and after treatment is considered by Dr. Thomas as not the best thing to do.

A common side effect of chemotherapy is fatigue which can lead to anxiety and depression. Regular exercise during treatment can improve mood, reduce anxiety and contribute to prevention of ‘chemo-brain’. During initial treatments of chemotherapy and radiotherapy it is important to maintain activity and keep moving. After treatment is finished Dr. Thomas advises to exercise more vigorously, building up slowly to perhaps 2.5 to 3 hours per week in an enjoyable activity such as brisk walking.

Dr. Thomas delivered an interesting PowerPoint presentation entitled "Evidence based lifestyle and self-help strategies after Cancer", which you can see here - https://youtu.be/wrYXIbXccmM .

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Exercise Decreases Cancer Recurrence

Exercise Decreases Cancer Recurrence | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Exercise can lower chances of cancer recurrence. It also gives one woman a sense of empowerment.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

Studies show that obese survivors of certain types of breast cancer are 40% more likely to have a recurrence than survivors whose weight is in a healthy range. Even women who are overweight but not obese are more likely to experience a recurrence. Breast cancer survivors who exercise as little as three hours per week after diagnosis experience a lower risk of a fatal recurrence than survivors who do not exercise.

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