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Chemicals in Common Use Found to Cause Cancer! 20% of Cancer Diagnoses Could be Due to Chemicals!

Chemicals in Common Use Found to Cause Cancer! 20% of Cancer Diagnoses Could be Due to Chemicals! | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Current research estimates that up to one in five cancer diagnoses could be caused by chemical exposures in the environment.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

Researchers have published their findings on the links between common chemicals and cancer risk. They studied 85 different chemicals that are not considered carcinogenic on their own. They found that, when combined, 50 of the chemicals supported key cancer-related mechanisms at exposure levels currently found in the environment.

Paola Marignani, a professor at Dalhousie University, participated in the research project. She said the chemicals of concern are commonly found in our environment, as well as in products we use on a daily basis. "(They include) some of the fuels, some of the plastics, and some of the cosmetics we use," and “They're in our food, our products, our preservatives, our pesticides."

Current research estimates that up to one in five cancer diagnoses could be caused by chemical exposures in the environment.

On the subject of chemicals, there are approximately 85,000 in current use and listed with the Environmental Protection Agency. A logical conclusion of most people is that they have of course been thoroughly tested and confirmed to be safe. That is definitely not the case, however surprising that may be to people. There is no law requiring industrial chemicals be tested for safety before being put on the market.

To make matters worse if you consult the National Toxicity Program (an agency whose mission is to evaluate agents of public health concern), which is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services they quite openly state “More than 80,000 chemicals are registered for use in the United States. Each year, an estimated 2,000 new ones are introduced for use in such everyday items as foods, personal care products, prescription drugs, household cleaners, and lawn care products. We do not know the effects of many of these chemicals on our health, yet we may be exposed to them while manufacturing, distributing, using, and disposing of them or when they become pollutants in our air, water, or soil.” See for yourself here - http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/about/index.html

So it certainly seems that nobody has any responsibility to focus on the introduction of chemicals, and whether they present any health problems to the community. If you consider the fact that chemicals in combination is a completely different concern, it is virtually impossible to determine safety levels to any satisfactory degree.

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What Happens When a Family That Usually Doesn’t Eat Organic Food Suddenly Starts?

Want to know what happens in your body when you switch from eating conventional food to organic? Watch this! The study was conducted by the Swedish Environme...
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

A study was conducted by the Swedish Environmental Research Institute IVL to know more about what happens in the body when switching from conventional to organic food.

Most of the food that is grown today that we purchase from supermarkets is treated with pesticides and chemicals. The driving force behind the use of pesticides and the ‘treatment’ of these food products has been to produce more food, with less damage from pests, extending shelf-life, and generally providing a more favorable economic return.

However there seems to have been very little, if any, regard to maintaining or enhancing the nutritional content of the majority of these products. In fact if you take time to look at the US Department of Agriculture database you will see that over the past 50-years the nutritional content of our food has diminished by an amazing extent. When time permits I will post more about that investigation I have done.

So we can logically conclude that in general there seems to be nobody in the growing or supply chain that has the interests of the consumer’s health and nutritional maintenance as a first priority.

For the study in Sweden a typical family of five members was chosen for the 2-week study during which they only ate organic foods. Prior to that they ate like most families, and did not frequently eat much organic food, but were interested in eating more.

At commencement of the study tests were done on all family members to determine their body’s present status of various chemicals. All family members were found to have had insecticides, fungicides and plant growth regulators in their body. At the end of the 2-weeks on an organic food diet further tests were done which showed that in all family members almost all of the pesticides had disappeared.

The study shows that choosing organic food can dramatically reduce the level of pesticides and chemicals in the body.

It has long been known that exposure to high levels of certain chemicals can cause cancer. There is now growing scientific evidence that exposure to lower levels of chemicals in the general environment is contributing to society’s cancer burden.

We all realize that the statements and justifications put forward by the growers and organizations with vested interests in chemicals will show study after study justifying that chemicals are safe. Today most of us have become wary of such statements, which are regarded increasingly with suspicion and disbelief.

But there are some facts available out there. Here is a statement from the US Government, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website which I have kept (accessed on Dec 7, 2013) – “More than 80,000 chemicals are registered for use in the United States. However, we do not know the effects of many of these chemicals on our health.” Another important fact is that we know very little about the long term effects of eating food treated with pesticides, and we know even less about the possible effects of various combinations of these together in our body.

You can refer here for more information on the above study - https://www.coop.se/organiceffect

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Avoid These Things to Lower Your Breast Cancer Risk

Avoid These Things to Lower Your Breast Cancer Risk | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Scientists identify highest priority toxic chemicals to target for breast cancer prevention.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

After my previous post, I came across this which although less thorough you may find it easier to read.

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Chemicals Common in Everyday Life Linked to Breast Cancer

Chemicals Common in Everyday Life Linked to Breast Cancer | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Some of the biggest sources of mammary carcinogens in the environment are benzene and butadiene, which can come from vehicle exhaust, lawn equipment, tobacco smoke and charred food.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

Research done by the Silent Spring Institute, a 20-year-old organization made up of scientists who focus on the environment and women's health, lists 17 chemicals woman should avoid that have been shown to cause breast cancer in lab rats and are likely to do the same in women.

The chemicals are found in gasoline, diesel and other vehicle exhaust, flame retardants, stain-resistant textiles, paint removers, disinfection byproducts in drinking water, tobacco smoke, charred food, cleaning solvents like methylene chloride, pharmaceuticals used in hormone replacement therapy, nonstick coatings, and styrene used to make Styrofoam.

"Every woman in America has been exposed to chemicals that may increase her risk of getting breast cancer," according to the co-author of the study Julia Brody. "Unfortunately, the link between toxic chemicals and breast cancer has largely been ignored. Reducing chemical exposures could save many, many women's lives."

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, May 25, 2014 3:15 PM

And THIS is why StupidCancer.org founder & CEO Matthew Zackary is angered by the current bill.  Read more here...

http://www.rollcall.com/news/new_house_chemicals_bill_angers_cancer_survivors_commentary-231387-1.html

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Chemicals Linked to Causing Cancer.

Chemicals Linked to Causing Cancer. | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
The insecticide lindane, once widely used in agriculture and to treat human lice and scabies, causes cancer and has been specifically linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma, the World Health Organization said
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

The WHO's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) reports that "Large epidemiological studies of agricultural exposures in the United States and Canada showed a 60% increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in those exposed to lindane."

(IARC) also said that DDT, or dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, probably causes cancer, with scientific evidence linking it to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), testicular cancer and liver cancer. DDT was introduced for the control of insect-borne diseases during World War Two and was later applied widely to eradicate malaria and in agriculture.

Although most uses of it were banned from the 1970s, IARC cautioned that DDT and its breakdown products are "highly persistent and can be found in the environment and in animal and human tissues throughout the world".

On the subject of chemicals, there are approximately 85,000 in current use and listed with the Environmental Protection Agency. A logical conclusion of most people is that they have of course been thoroughly tested and confirmed to be safe. That is definitely not the case, however surprising that may be to people. There is no law requiring industrial chemicals be tested for safety before being put on the market.

To make matters worse if you consult the National Toxicity Program (an agency whose mission is to evaluate agents of public health concern), which is part of the US Department of Health and Human Services they quite openly state “More than 80,000 chemicals are registered for use in the United States. Each year, an estimated 2,000 new ones are introduced for use in such everyday items as foods, personal care products, prescription drugs, household cleaners, and lawn care products. We do not know the effects of many of these chemicals on our health, yet we may be exposed to them while manufacturing, distributing, using, and disposing of them or when they become pollutants in our air, water, or soil.” See for yourself here - http://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/about/index.html

So it certainly seems that nobody has any responsibility to focus on the introduction of chemicals, and whether they present any health problems to the community. If you consider the fact that chemicals in combination is a completely different concern, it is virtually impossible to determine safety levels to any satisfactory degree.

By the way in another report just this week it has been found that some chemicals when combined in the body may trigger cancer. I will also post that report.

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Study Finds That Common Fragrance Ingredient Can Cause Cancer

Study Finds That Common Fragrance Ingredient Can Cause Cancer | Cancer - Advances, Knowledge, Integrative & Holistic Treatments | Scoop.it
Last month (July 28) a committee convened by the National Academy of Sciences confirmed a federal interagency group’s conclusion that styrene, a chemical building block used to produce a wide variety of everyday products, can cause cancer.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

The fragrance ingredient styrene has been classed as a compound that is “reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen” according to compelling evidence found by a committee convened by the National Academy of Sciences to do a study. The committee reported that some studies would support a strong argument for listing styrene as a known human carcinogen.

Styrene is commonly used as a fragrance to enhance the scent of many cosmetic and household products. Federal labeling law means that ingredients added to products to provide a pleasant scent, or to mask a bad one, need only be listed under the generic term “fragrance.” So users of products will not know if those products contain styrene.

Besides cologne and other personal care products, fragrances are also used to scent household care products such as dish and laundry detergent. Other sources of environmental exposures include food (from migration of styrene from polymer packaging materials), cigarette smoke, vehicle exhaust, and other forms of combustion and incineration of styrene polymers.

Over half the styrene that is produced in the United States is used for the manufacture of polystyrene, which is a component of such products as plastic packaging, building and refrigeration-equipment insulation, and disposable plates and cups. In the general population, the average daily exposure to styrene in air is estimated to be 18 to 54 µg/person/day and the average daily exposure to styrene in food is estimated to be 0.2 to 1.2 µg/person/day.

The only way to steer clear of styrene in personal care products is to avoid using any that say they contain “fragrance” but don’t list the perfume’s individual components.

For more information you can read the full report on styrene by the National Toxicology Program at this link - http://www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=18725

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Chemicals Identified to Avoid to Lower Breast Cancer Risk

Breast cancer is the most common invasive malignancy among women in the US and the leading cause of death in women from their late 30s to their early 50s.
Graham Player Ph.D.'s insight:

A study published in the National Institutes of Health journal, Environmental Health Perspectives, has highlighted a range of chemicals that women are most commonly exposed to, that have been found to contribute to the development of breast cancer.

Unfortunately, we are all exposed to chemicals on a regular basis. However the link between toxic chemicals and cancer appears to have been largely ignored.

In their review of chemicals that have evidence of being human breast carcinogens, the researchers identified 17 high priority chemicals or chemical families based on exposure and carcinogenicity, which include the following, and should be avoided:

1,3-Butadiene - 1,3-Butadiene exposure in the general population is primarily via inhalation of cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust, and gasoline fumes, as well as emissions from industrial facilities

Acrylamide – Major sources of acrylamide exposure include diet (especially starchy foods, such as french fries, cooked at high temperatures) and tobacco smoke. Acrylamide exposures are believed to be low from other sources, which include grouts, adhesives, and polyacrylamide gels used in many consumer products (e.g., diapers), in drinking water treatment, and elsewhere.

Aromatic amines – Aromatic amines contain nitrogen bound to benzene or other aromatic rings. They are important intermediates in industrial synthesis of polyurethane, pesticides, dyes, and many other products.

Benzene – The highest exposures to benzene are from gasoline (riding in a car, pumping gasoline, storing gasoline in a basement or attached garage) and tobacco smoke, although automobile exhaust and other forms of urban and industrial air pollution are also important exposure sources. Benzene is also used in some consumer products including adhesive removers, paints, sealants, finishers, and engine fuel and oils.

Halogenated organic solvents –These chemicals were widely used in the past, with uses including dry cleaning, hair spray propellant, soil fumigants, food processing, gasoline additives, and paint and spot removers. Although use has declined, occupational exposures are still common, and some consumer exposure remains.

Ethylene and propylene oxide – EtO is a gas used to sterilize medical equipment, food and spices, clothing, and musical instruments. It has also been detected in tobacco smoke and auto exhaust. EtO is a high production volume chemical used to manufacture many other chemicals, such as ethylene glycol, so one exposure source may be air pollution near industrial facilities.

1,2-Propylene oxide (PO) - Another high production volume industrial chemical, used to manufacture other chemicals (including polyurethane foam) and as a sterilant and fumigant, and in some automotive and paint products (NTP 2011). Tobacco smoke is also a source of exposure.

Flame retardants and metabolites – Used in the manufacture of many household items and clothing.

Heterocyclic amines – Both meat cooked at high temperatures and tobacco smoke contain heterocyclic amines.

Endogenous and pharmaceutical hormones and other endocrine disrupting chemicals – These are present in the food supply and various products.

MX – MX is one of hundreds of genotoxic by-products of drinking water disinfection.

Nitro-PAHs - 1-nitropyrene and other nitroPAHs are air pollutants thought to primarily come from diesel exhaust.

Ochratoxin A – Human exposure to the naturally occurring mycotoxin ochratoxin A occurs mainly through consumption of contaminated grain, nuts, and pork products.

PAHs – Exposure to PAHs, such as benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), occurs primarily through inhalation of tobacco smoke or polluted air and ingestion of charred foods.

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) – PFOA and other perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are used in non-stick and stain-resistant coatings on rugs, furniture, clothes and cookware, as well as in fire-fighting applications, cosmetics, lubricants, paints, and adhesives.

Styrene - Exposure to styrene in the general population occurs at levels of micrograms per day due mainly to inhalation of indoor air and cigarette smoke and intake of food that has been in contact with polystyrene. Styrene is present in consumer products and building materials, including polystyrene, carpets, adhesives, hobby and craft supplies, and home maintenance products.

Read the report for yourself here - http://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/wp-content/uploads/advpub/2014/5/ehp.1307455.pdf

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