Canadian wildlife conservation
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Hinterland Who's Who - Beaver

Hinterland Who's Who - Beaver | Canadian wildlife conservation | Scoop.it
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- The river otter is able to enter the den via the water and kill the kits inside; however, an adult or subadult beaver always stays with the kits to offer protection.

- conservation plans have been put into effect by federal and provincial governments, with the co-operation of trappers, and beavers have been reintroduced into many areas that were stripped by early trappers. 

- Beavers maintain water levels, improve habitat for many forms of wildlife, stabilize stream flow, and prevent stream bed erosion

- the trade in beaver waned, partly with the decline of the beaver hat as fashionable headgear, and partly because the beavers themselves were becoming scarce all over North America.

- As a result, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of beavers in Canada, and their population is now a healthy one. 

-No other animal has influenced Canada’s history to the extent that the beaver has. When Europeans began to settle in northern North America, beaver pelts were the prize that lured them farther and farther into the wilderness. 

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Environment Canada - Nature - Conservation of Polar Bears

Environment Canada - Nature - Conservation of Polar Bears | Canadian wildlife conservation | Scoop.it
Canada is home to more than two-thirds of world's polar bear population and so, has a unique conservation responsibility to protect these iconic creatures.
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-Canada is home to approximately 16 000 of the estimated 20 000–25 000 polar bears in the global polar regions.

  -Canada’s inventory schedule for polar bears is designed to ensure that there are up-to-date population estimates for all 13 subpopulations that occur in our country. 

-In Canada, polar bears are protected through a collaborative approach that is shared with provinces, territories and regional wildlife management boards. 

-The polar bear was listed as a species of Special Concern in November 2011 under theSpecies at Risk Act (SARA), which is strong domestic legislation to conserve and protect wildlife in Canada. 

-Regulating the import and export of live polar bears, polar bear hides and trophies through the Wild Animal and Plant Protection and Regulation of International and Interprovincial Trade Act (WAPPRIITA).

-Approximately 2% of the Canadian polar bear population enters international trade (300 bears annually), and exports from Canada have not increased over the years. 

- The current global population size is estimated at 20 000–25 000 polar bears. 

 

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Change to protection status of Canada geese: Legislation

Change to protection status of Canada geese: Legislation | Canadian wildlife conservation | Scoop.it
Canada goose has transferred from Schedule 1 to Schedule 5 of the Wildlife Act. This means the species is “not protected”, allowing anyone to hunt or kill geese at any time of year.
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-Hunters wanting to hunt geese on conservation land still need to obtain a hunting permit but no longer need a game licence.

-Canada goose has been moved from Schedule 1 to Schedule 5 of the Wildlife Act. This means the species is no longer managed by fish and game councils but is now “not protected” (note this does not mean “pest”).

-Canada geese now have the same protection status as many other introduced bird species such as rock pigeons, magpies, and wild turkeys.

-The change to the protection status of Canada goose is aimed primarily at addressing unacceptable and increasing goose impacts on farm pasture and crops

- Landowners and others requiring geese to be controlled have the option of undertaking control themselves or liaising with local recreational hunters interested in goose hunting opportunities.

-These might include a need for restrictions on the use of aircraft to control geese (which the birds can learn to avoid), or a ban on the use of lead shot when shooting geese over waterways (with possible exceptions for certain areas such as Molesworth).

 

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