CALS in the News
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Va. betting parlors closed to Triple Crown wagers | Sacramento (CA) Bee

Va. betting parlors closed to Triple Crown wagers | Sacramento (CA) Bee | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
In the state where famed Triple Crown winner Secretariat was born, off-track betting parlors that would ordinarily be packed with gamblers watching California Chrome try to match Secretariat's feat Saturday will likely be closed or almost empty.
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Arizona Gardeners: Scheduling garden and landscape irrigations

Arizona Gardeners: Scheduling garden and landscape irrigations | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
With hot weather temperatures right around the corner, now is a good time to review the basic rules of irrigation.
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Red-hot poker plant

Red-hot poker plant | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Q: I have a customer who is trying to identify a plant. She says it can change directions of the branching/leaves almost at will. It has leaves like a wild
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Palo verde beetles mainly a danger to unhealthy trees

Palo verde beetles mainly a danger to unhealthy trees | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Q: I have a question related to the “Desert Museum” palo verde.
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Registration now open for Summer After-Care

Registration now open for Summer After-Care | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
The University of Arizona Cooperative Extension will be hosting the 4-H Summer After-Care program, for students going into grades three through five, Monday through Thursday, from May 31 to June
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Caterpillars enjoy Texas mountain laurels but are unlikely to do real harm

Caterpillars enjoy Texas mountain laurels but are unlikely to do real harm | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Gold Kist is an excellent backyard apricot for warm winter climates.
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Students helping school farm grow

Students helping school farm grow | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Richard McPherson doled out tasks to students in his first period agricultural science class on a recent Wednesday before they boarded a bus to the Rio Rico High School farm
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Enzyme discovery leads scientists further down path to pumping oil from plants | AgriLife.org

Enzyme discovery leads scientists further down path to pumping oil from plants | AgriLife.org | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
ounts of fuel-grade oil, according to Dr. Tim Devarenne, AgriLife Research biochemist in College Station and lead scientist on the team.

Devarenne’s lab has been studying the concept of making fuel from algae on a $2 million National Science Foundation grant for four years.

“The interesting thing about this alga is that it produces large amounts of liquid hydrocarbons, which can be used to make fuels such as gasoline, kerosene and diesel fuel,” Devarenne said. “And these liquid hydrocarbons made by the alga are currently found in petroleum deposits, so we are already using them as a source to generate fuel.

“Botryococcus is found pretty much everywhere in the world except for seawater,” he added. “It’s very cosmopolitan. It grows in freshwater or brackish water. It’s found in almost all ponds and lakes around the world. It’s been found in every continent except Antarctica, and it grows from mountain to desert climates.”

What his lab has been trying to understand is how Botryococcus braunii makes the liquid hydrocarbons — what genes and pathways are involved — so the genes can be manipulated to make more oil, possibly by transferring those genes into a land plant like tobacco, or maybe other algae that grow very quickly, Devarenne said.

“One of the issues with Botryococcus is that it grows very slowly. You just don’t get a lot of biomass and on an economic scale that means it would not work to use this alga. It takes about a week for one Botryococcus cell to double into two cells, whereas a faster growing algae — but one that doesn’t make a lot of oil — can double in about six hours,” he said. “Maybe if we can transfer the genetic information to make these oils into quicker growing organisms like other algae that grow a lot quicker or a land plant that can produce large amounts of biomass, we can have them produce oil for us.”

But first, researchers need to understand which genes enable oil production.

“In this study, we were interested in deciphering the biochemical pathway for making this oil, which is called lycopadiene,” he said. “We discovered a very interesting gene that’s called lycopaoctaene synthase, or LOS. And the enzyme encoded by the LOS gene is able to initiate the production of the oil, so we started to essentially pick apart this pathway.”
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Guy Carpenter Joins aquaTECTURE as Senior VP Strategic Operations

Guy Carpenter Joins aquaTECTURE as Senior VP Strategic Operations | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
The Board of Directors of aquaTECTURE is pleased to announce that Guy W. Carpenter has been named Senior Vice President of Strategi
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This Guy Got Himself Stung 1,000 Times For Science—Here’s What He Learned

This Guy Got Himself Stung 1,000 Times For Science—Here’s What He Learned | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
A new book reveals what it’s like to be stung by nearly 100 species of insect, and some of the secrets of things that sting
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Stung for Science: Meet the Man Who Measures Pain

Stung for Science: Meet the Man Who Measures Pain | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
In a new book, researcher Justin Schmidt recounts the worst insect stings he has ever suffered in the name of science.
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In 2016, The Field Is Open For New Arizona Farmers

In 2016, The Field Is Open For New Arizona Farmers | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
The average farm size in Arizona is decreasing. That’s because more and more small farms are cropping up in the state.
The same trend is true for Maricopa County, to the point where more than half the farms in the county were less than 10 acres in 2012. That’s according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture census.
The definition of a farm is changing, and with it, so are the people who call themselves farmers.
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SeedQuest - Central information website for the global seed industry

SeedQuest - Central information website for the global seed industry | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Information Services for Seed Professionals - The Best Place on the Web for Seed Professionals
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UA researchers working to predict spread of Zika virus

UA researchers working to predict spread of Zika virus | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Major question: Can Zika can be transmitted from a female mosquito to its eggs?
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Kids’ dental health improving in Arizona

Kids’ dental health improving in Arizona | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
FLORENCE — Tooth decay is the single most common chronic childhood disease and can cause lasting harm to a child’s health as well as impact cognitive and social development. That can lead to missed school days, an inability to focus and may cause anxiety or other factors that affect academic success.
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Curling leaves on citrus trees is sign of drought

Curling leaves on citrus trees is sign of drought | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Q: How likely are seriously neglected mature citrus trees to recover?
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County benefits from, inspires AmeriCorps crew

County benefits from, inspires AmeriCorps crew | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Eight volunteers arrived in Santa Cruz County on April 14 to tackle an array of community improvement tasks.
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Kidz Cooking Club coming to Clifton, Duncan, this summer

Kidz Cooking Club coming to Clifton, Duncan, this summer | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
CLIFTON — Those looking for fun for children this summer need to get to the local library.
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14th annual Care Fair planning begins

14th annual Care Fair planning begins | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
The Douglas Care Fair will be held on Saturday, Aug. 6 at Airport Park, from 9 to 11 a.m., for children of all grade levels of the Douglas Unified School
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CAC clips: Outstanding students chosen to speak at commencement

CAC clips: Outstanding students chosen to speak at commencement | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
SIGNAL PEAK — Alejandra Cano, a student at the Central Arizona College Superstition Mountain Campus, and Audrey Bimbi from the Signal Peak Campus were chosen as the student speakers for the CAC district graduation last Friday on the green at Signal Peak. 
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Inaugural Field Day for ARPA-E’s “Transportation Energy Resources from Renewable Agriculture” program set for June 2 : Biofuels Digest

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Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Cool Summer Nights 2016 - Tucson, AZ

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum Cool Summer Nights 2016 - Tucson, AZ | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Tucson, AZ:  Beat the Arizona heat and enjoy a family-friendly outing during our popular Cool Summer Nights. So what makes these Saturday evenings so enchanting? The stu
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UA receives grant for Zika virus research

UA receives grant for Zika virus research | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
The National Science Foundation just awarded the University of Arizona with a $200,000 Rapid Response grant that aims to help predict outbreaks of Zika virus.
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PestWeb | What’s the Most Painful Sting? An Interview with ‘the King of Sting’

PestWeb | What’s the Most Painful Sting? An Interview with ‘the King of Sting’ | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Providing online tools and resources to help PMPs succeed in their business. Online Ordering, Product Documents, Online Training for state CEUs, Pest Identification and more!
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Experts discuss moving past mine spill

Experts discuss moving past mine spill | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
Scientists and officials at a conference addressed the public on how to move forward from the Gold King Mine spill.
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Growers eye FDA's Produce Safety Rule from ground level | Food Safety News

Growers eye FDA's Produce Safety Rule from ground level | Food Safety News | CALS in the News | Scoop.it
esh produce industry is watching closely as enforceable requirements in the FDA’s Produce Safety Rule gradually come into play at ground level. The rule is one of seven the agency has drafted to implement facets of the sweeping 2011 Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA).

Published in the Federal Register on Nov. 27, 2015, the final version of the Produce Safety Rule “establishes, for the first time, science-based minimum standards for the safe growing, harvesting, packing and holding of fruits and vegetables grown for human consumption,” according to the Food and Drug Administration. It covers both domestic and imported produce.

Produce harvestMost produce growers, packers, processors or sellers will be subject to the rule, with staggered compliance deadlines ranging from two to four years, depending on the size of the operation.

However, there are exemptions — and qualified exemptions — from the rule, such as farms having an average of less than $25,000 in annual produce sales during the previous three years.

Also eligible for exemption from the rule is any produce which:

is grown for personal or on-farm consumption;
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