California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water
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California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water
Geo-engineering weather modification through cloud seeding, a  Pacific Gas and Electric Company practice for 60 years, to tease out rain and snow for a burgeoning population, has not been justified as having contributed to increasing water resources. Like a dog chasing its tail.  Evidence is growing that as our climate wet gets wetter and and dry gets drier, geo engineering cloud seeding, unproven to making a net increase in water, may be worsening already increasing Extreme Weather. Though California hurricanes are not unheard of, the real threat exists of an Ark Event (that's the size of ten Mississippi rivers deluging over a two week period). Like the 1857 event making an inland sea in Central California, reducing agriculture then by 2/3, today's 500 year drought looms heavy to comparably destroy California's economy already in tatters, from whatever cataclysm. Extreme Hurricane, Ark Event, Permanent Drought. Or maybe pick two or three of them.
Curated by Jack Lindblad
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Water—Who uses how much?

Water—Who uses how much? | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Jeffrey Mount, UC Davis Professor of Geology  Whereas agriculture used to consume 80% of the state's water supply, today 46% of              captured and stored water goes to environmental purposes...
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Brown read ahead and his twin tube 40-foot-wide, 35-mile-long tunnels under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta boondoggle  is moot. Yah!

 

No clear purpose has been put forward for any tunneling or burrowing water from upstream to downstream except too favor Central Valley farmers.


Our Campaign's railing against Brown's warmed over, not appropriate twin tunnel proposal helped in the larger effort to see it removed from the table.

"agriculture claiming 80% of state's developed water" appears to be not accurate and even alarmist:


'In the long run, what's sorely needed in California is a reprioritizing of water use. Currently, agriculture claims 80% of the state's developed water. And 55% of exported delta water goes to two irrigation districts in the southern San Joaquin Valley.'

 


http://www.latimes.com/local/la-me-cap-drought-20140224,0,7451531,full.column

Quoted below seems to be the authoritative breakdown of California water usage, not what Skelton quotes from the above reference:

"Under the new reporting system, gross water use includes both the applied water for urban and agricultural use, as well as that set aside for flow requirements to meet habitat and water quality needs. This is the source of the second part of the above statement. A more accurate figure is roughly 40% agriculture, 10% urban and 50% environment.

Sounds like the environment is taking all the water after all, even with the new accounting system. But this is a larger total volume of water than in the old accounting system, since environmental water is now added in to the mix. This accounting method is both flawed and misleading.

The method used by DWR sums up all of the instream flows required by regulations. The large environmental number is dominated by flows in rivers designated as Wild and Scenic. Most of the volume that flows down Wild and Scenic Rivers is in the North Coast and includes flood flows, where there is no practical way to recover it for either agricultural or urban use (see blog “water to the sea isn’t wasted”).

When you examine water use within the interconnected network of California that feeds farms and cities, use is roughly 52% agricultural, 14% urban and 33% environmental. While a big difference, even this overstates the environmental take.

When you account based on net water use—meaning water that is lost to evapotranspiration or salt sinks and not returned to rivers or groundwater for alternative uses—this translates to 62% agricultural, 16% urban and 22% environmental. And some of that environmental water is used to keep water quality high enough for drinking."

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Cloud seeding underway over El Dorado County

Cloud seeding underway over El Dorado County | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
The Sacramento Municipal Utility District is using aerial cloud seeding over El Dorado County to coax as much moisture out of passing storms as possible.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

What happens when you steal water in a 500 year drought? Drier areas get drier and wetter areas get wetter. More severe drought. You can liken it to a positive amplification feedback loop that has sent temperatures soaring 20 degrees in the Arctic and causing the polar vortex to split and move south to sit over most of the continental US. Geoengineering cloud seeding is worsening the drought. In lieu of trying to replace electric demand, immediate and significant cuts in usage (conservation) is the prudent, science-based public policy to pursue, not MAD mutually assured destruction science of cloud seeding, chemtrails and haarp.

 

'“Water is a scarce commodity and that’s our least expensive form of generation for electricity, so anything we can to do benefits SMUD customers,” said McFadden.

The price of addition precipitation can go as high as $3 million, perhaps higher during an extreme drought.

SMUD said that’s money the utility saves by not having to purchase as much replacement power from out of state to compensate for reduced hydro power production.'

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Yahoo!

Yahoo! | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Jack Lindblad's insight:

With more salty ocean water encroaching inland threatening Delta ecosystems, tasks to keep Pacific waters out makes the twin tubes the $50 Billion boondoggle legacy of Brown's family it is. The 500 year drought means no rain or snow met from the Sierra to flow through the twin tubes. How would the plan stop salt water from sea level rise infiltrate and destroy the delta wetlands? It is a zero.

 

Time for Extreme Climate weather mitigation like geoengineering and massive, centralized projects is gone. Adaptation and localized revitalization are the only options left. Decisions must be forthcoming to address any future of California's agriculture and urbanized regions. Detroit's out-migration serves a model for us 38 million sun-worshippers. Should we stay or should we go? The Great Transition Movement will help light the path for each of us.

 

'“This could potentially be the driest water year in 500 years,” says B. Lynn Ingram, a University of California at Berkeley paleoclimatologist.

Assuming the drought continues, it’s going to have huge and complex effects. Among them:

* Farmers are going to fallow land or pump lots of groundwater, depleting the aquifers for future years. (And water-stealing illegal pot-growers may get pursued more vigorously.) * Some towns may run out out of water; the small community of Willits in Mendocino, has only a 100-day supply left. * Summer wildfires were bad last year (remember the huge Yosemite blaze?)—but with the state even crisper, things may now get worse. * Some rivers will go dry. (Fish always seem to have the last dibs on water in times of drought.) * Air pollution will continue to be a problem. The unusually hot, stagnant air has made it the worst pollution season ever in the San Joaquin Valley. It’s triggered purple alert days in Bakersfield, worse than the usual red—and that’s may continue for awhile. Bay Area winter pollution is also nearing a record.

Then there’s politics. Water was already bound to be a big topic this year in California, what with the state’s $25 billion proposal to fix the Delta, the confluence of two rivers where much Sierra Nevada water flows through. It’s an incredible sum—far more than, say, the $2 billion in extra spending that Texas agonized over last year. But voters may be more open after a few dry years.'

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6 Scary Facts About California's Drought

6 Scary Facts About California's Drought | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Conditions are getting severe, and dangerous, out west.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Stephen Chu, addressing the castrstrophic impacts of Extreme Climate Change: 'We’re looking at a scenario where there’s no more agriculture in California. I don’t actually see how they can keep their cities going.'

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California Stretched by Worsening Drought

California Stretched by Worsening Drought | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Record-low precipitation in 2013 has worsened California's drought, draining reservoirs, forcing farmers to keep fallow thousands of acres of fields and leaving some ski resorts high and dry during the busy holiday season.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

California enters its third winter of extreme drought. Implications are dire for all Americans expecting affordable food,  the US being the largest agricultural producer. Continuing drought potentially will cost CA farmers $1 billion in 2014. The longer we allow Big Corporate Eveything continue to blind us on climate change, the more unaffordable and unlikely society will survive.

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Catholic Bishops Pray to Relieve Dry California

Catholic Bishops Pray to Relieve Dry California | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Catholic bishops called for divine intervention Tuesday as California endures what appears to be its third straight dry winter.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Whatever your faith, if any, Indigenous Rain Dances are in order with your prayer.

'Without relief, state water managers said they will be able to deliver just 5 percent of the water sought by agencies that supply more than 25 million Californians and nearly a million acres of irrigated farmland.'

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California faces a catastrophic drought next year

  California faces a catastrophic drought next year By Todd Woody, Quartz,  12/27/13    In the run-up to the holidays, few noticed a rather horrifying number California water managers released last week: 5%.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Stephen Chu said he doesn't see how California agriculture and urban centers can survive. And we left this to Cloud seeding? Insane. Sociopathic.

'Westlands Water District, water supplier to 600,000 acres in California’s bread basket: "The potential cost to the regional economy? More than $1 billion.”'

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Earth's New Normal: Wild Weather 2014

Earth's New Normal: Wild Weather 2014 | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
The Arctic is warming at least two times faster than the rest of our planet.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

No matter even if we dropped to zero GHG for decades, runaway global warming is locked in producing with ever increasing frequency and severity more ExtremeWeather. Thank Big Oil by expropriating and nationalizing them, arresting their corporate officers for Crimes Against Humanity  along with members of the US government wedded to Big Corporate Everythhing. Let's ensure our voices are heard and clearly understood, for our survial as a species for all human society is rapidly being extincted by profiteering Extinction Protocols of, by, and for the ruling 400 family elite through their elected, unjustly enriched political class.

 

'As of January 1, 2014 California reached its driest mark since record keeping began in 1849. In Los Angeles where I live we average 14.93 inches of precipitation annually - this year we received 3.60 inches. San Francisco received a meager 3.38 inches of rainfall in 2013; its normal is 20.65 inches.

A strong ridge has developed off the California coast preventing the storms carrying moisture that normally falls as snow onto the Sierra Nevada's, which supplies about 85% of the the water for the eighth mightiest economy on the globe.

Currently 85 percent of California is experiencing a severe drought; this is very serious because without water the nations leading agricultural producer at $16 billion annually (including the world's largest almond crop at $3 billion, alone) is in dire straights. The drought is predicted to cost farmers at least $1 billion.'

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California Gripped By Driest Year Ever — With No Relief In Sight

California Gripped By Driest Year Ever — With No Relief In Sight | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
As California enters its third consecutive dry winter, with no sign of relief on the horizon, fears are growing over increased wildfire activity and additional stress placed on already strained water supplies.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Permanent drought is evidenciary proof that geoengineering does not work. Where's the rain when you need it? Try clouding all of California. You would see Ark events.So settle in folks. More fire. No water. Geoengineering only hastens the day looming soon of complete societal collapse - even the ruling 400 family elite will find eAArth surface a baking oven.

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California Water Rights

California Water Rights | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it

"An interactive map of water rights held in California."

 

"Providing citizens with better tools for understanding how water is being used in our state."

Jack Lindblad's insight:

Does California really warrent unproven geo engineering cloud seeding when water management is 'not ready for prime time'? Full disclosure, transparency, and accountability in managing our water resources needs to be provided before opening the tap wider.

'The primary challenge with water in California is not its scarcity, but rather how we manage it. Many experts have mutually concluded, that a major first step to improving our management of water is by reforming how we account for it. Whether a lack of adequate statements of diversion for surface and subsurface waters, or the existence of a fine grained environmental monitoring network, it is clear that we could do a better job of recording and measuring. New instruments and institutions are necessary to accomplish this. It is not a question of technology, but one of techniques. The technology is available and affordable, but the institutions and practices of how we measure and document our water resources are not fully mature. We must get control of our understanding of what is in the system at any given point. We owe it to ourselves, our economy, and our ecosystem. This effort benefits all stakeholders.'

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NASA - Could a Hurricane Ever Strike Southern California?

NASA - Could a Hurricane Ever Strike Southern California? | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
California has its share of disasters, like earthquakes, fires and floods. But what are the odds a hurricane could ever strike here? Turns out the concept isn't exactly all wet.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Never say never.

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Climate Change Is Altering Rainfall Patterns Worldwide: Scientific American

Climate Change Is Altering Rainfall Patterns Worldwide: Scientific American | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Wet areas get wetter, dry areas get drier, storm tracks move toward the poles
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Water is a finite resource. As cloud seeding teases out more snow and rain, adjacent local regions see more severe drought. Like a dog chasing its tail.

'Climate models predict that the addition of heat-trapping gases in the atmosphere will shift precipitation in two main ways. The first shift is in a strengthening of existing precipitation patterns. This is commonly called "wet get wetter, dry get drier."

Warmer air traps more water vapor, and scientists expect that additional water to fall in already wet parts of the Earth.

"But because precipitation has to be balanced by evaporation, we expect a [corresponding] increase in dry regions," Marvel said.'

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Geoengineering: Goldilocks effect to cloud seeding

Geoengineering: Goldilocks effect to cloud seeding | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Get this climate techno-fix right, and the effect is dramatic, Get it wrong, though, and you make the problem worse. So how do you get this to work as planned?
Jack Lindblad's insight:

'Using existing technology, we could engineer clouds“to cancel the entire warming caused by human activity from pre-industrial times to present day”. But cloud seeding, the latest of many geo-engineering proposals to mitigate climate change, has a drawback: get it only a bit wrong, and you make the problem worse.'

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Geoengineering: Our Last Hope, or a False Promise?

Geoengineering: Our Last Hope, or a False Promise? | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
We should not try to play God with the planet.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

"Experts" claim #geoengineering with all of its #moralhazards, unresolved capability to understand #gaia (James Locklock coined the hippy term to describe the earth systems as an interrelated, communicating sentient being) complexity is preferred to "allowing" present #Extinction to prematurely end all life on this #eAArth, a term coined by my and Bill McKibben to describe a permanently made uninhabitable planet once known as earth.

 

The only certain outcome with geoengineering is an accelerated demise locked in by #corporatist socializing its losses.

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Los Angeles Is Finally Starting to Run Out of Water | VICE United States

Los Angeles Is Finally Starting to Run Out of Water | VICE United States | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
California's governor just declared a drought emergency after the state's driest year in recorded history.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Extreme Weather borne of runaway temperature rise, broken nitrogen cycle, and biodiversity loss - three tipping points this planet now termed eAArth, has passed, prematurely ending all life and humanity, in this the Sixth Great Extinction, of this, the Anthropogenic Era - acting synergistically has ended any slim hope for survival from Climate mitigation. Determining resilient pockets of Revitalization and Climate Adaptation remains in humanity's vanishing toolkit for survival. But relocating 95% of California's 38 million population to the Extreme Weather reality of alternating Polar Vortex devastating freezing below zero temperature with Permanent Drought consuming the Midwest and Eastern continental US in no way is an easy or simple objective. The Great Culling is all-encompassing and on track. No public policy to slow down Extreme Climate catastrophes is possible since three tipping points of planetary habitability are passed as other tipping points are approaching. Big Corporate Everything has ended life on this planet as we know it.

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Gracie Wall's curator insight, February 18, 2014 1:48 PM

I feel like this article is important because it is relevant to my life and how everyone around me will have to make changes in their lifestyles indefinitely. The drought could affect many people and their jobs as well as their livelihoods, and that is a scary concept.

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U.N. climate chief calls for fossil-fuel divestment

U.N. climate chief calls for fossil-fuel divestment | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Just as importantly, Christiana Figueres says big institutional investors should triple the money they're putting into clean energy.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Extreme Weather from today's Extinction Level runaway greenhouse gas emissions will not stop for hundreds of years even after carbon emissions dropped to zero. Yet divestiture from burning million year old garbage and abiotic oil is immediately required to give the slimmest chance humanity survives as a species.

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Daily Kos: Drought emergency in California raises stakes on fracking fight

Daily Kos: Drought emergency in California raises stakes on fracking fight | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Today, Governor Jerry Brown declared a drought emergency for the State of California. While the details of what this declaration will entail for state water policy remain murky, one thing that ...
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Is it Brown's cognitive dissonance that has prevented him from immediately banning fracking to prevent catastrophic events from unprecedented drought? We must press Governor Brown to be seriously protecting Californians struggling with the drought and see Brown put an immediate halt to state fracking.

'Each fracking well starts with some 2 million gallons of water for an initial injection.

Taking an average nearly 5 million gallons of water would mean that if all the potential wells identified by the U.S. Energy Information Administration in California were to be fracked, it would require some 200 billion gallons of water.

And of course, aside from taking valuable water out of the system for use by Big Oil companies, fracking for oil is simply counter to any attempts at addressing climate change.'

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An overview of the extraordinary and ongoing California dry spell

An overview of the extraordinary and ongoing California dry spell | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Drought in California: an quick overview California is no stranger to drought.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Reliance on bioengineered cloud seeding is foolish and demonstrates incompetence in California water resource management.

'Reconstructions of California climate suggest that meteorological droughts lasting multiple decades are not uncommon over the past 1000 years, while there is evidence that dry periods of even longer duration occurred in California’s deeper geological past.'

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Whoa. Just look at how dry California is right now.

Whoa. Just look at how dry California is right now. | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
And we're not even close to Summer yet.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

California's resisilent carrying capacity is 5 percent of 38 million population is 2 million,. Implications for feeding US are more dire.
'AP reports if current trends hold, state water managers will deliver 5 percent of the water needed for more than 25 million Californians and nearly a million acres of farmland.'

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Driest year ever in Calif. sparks fire, water fears

Driest year ever in Calif. sparks fire, water fears | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
California is enduring its driest calendar year on record, with no signs of relief coming anytime soon. In San Francisco, the city is seeing its driest year since records began during the Gold Rush year of 1849.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Bioengineering cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is a contributor to pronounced and enduring drought.

'Catastrophic wildfires remain the greatest risk the state would likely face next year after a third-straight dry winter.'

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California Researchers Find Drastically Low Snowpack, Spelling Danger For 2014 Water Supplies

California Researchers Find Drastically Low Snowpack, Spelling Danger For 2014 Water Supplies | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
In first measurement of the season California only has one fifth of average snowpack, an important part of the state's water supply. Without some major precipitation it could be another unbearably dry year for the state.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Get ready for severe water rationing: 'Drier areas get drier. Wetter areas get wetter.' Cloud seeding along with all geoengineering fails. Science has not replicated our thin varnish of biosphere.

State resource managers say 'snowpack usually provides about one third of California’s annual water use. This year, it is more likely to account for about one twentieth.'

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Typhoon Haiyan influenced by climate change, scientists say

Typhoon Haiyan influenced by climate change, scientists say | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Extreme storm events such as super typhoon Haiyan, which wreaked havoc in the Philippines on Friday, are more likely in the future as the build-up of greenhouse gases warms the planet, scientists say.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Geoengineering cloud seeding may be a lens amplifying worsening Extreme Weather. Though hurricanes are erxtremely rare in California waters, both the specter of an Ark event and permanent drought can play out.

'Research, though, indicates that while there may be fewer tropical cyclones in the future, their intensity will increase.

A peer-reviewed report in Nature Geoscience published in 2010 by a team including Australia's Dr John McBride, found that models indicate a shift towards stronger storms in the future.

“Existing modelling studies ... consistently project decreases in the globally averaged frequency of tropical cyclones, by 6 to 34 per cent,” the report said. “Balanced against this, higher-resolution modelling studies typically project substantial increases in the frequency of the most intense cyclones, and increases of the order of 20 per cent in the precipitation rate within 100 kilometres of the storm centre.”

Since the atmosphere can hold 4 to 8 per cent more water per degree of warming, scientists say rain events have the potential to get more extreme, including cyclones.

The risk is for intense rainfall and flooding when they hit land and drop their water as rainfall increases with global warming, Professor Steffen said. “They're packing more punch in terms of the wind and also the water vapour or rain that they are carrying.”

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Global Weather Modification Assault Causing Climate Chaos And Environmental Catastrophe

Global Weather Modification Assault Causing Climate Chaos And Environmental Catastrophe | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
Exposing the chemtrail-geoengineering coverup
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Cloud seeding is indeed of geoengineering that causes a finite resource, water, to concentrate in targeted regions while removing snow, moisuture, rain in adjacent regions, precipitating and intensifying drought with 'positive feedback' mechanisms.

 

'Artificially nucleated storms appear to be carried out under a myriad of conditions. In many cases, storms that should have yielded only rain, can be artificially nucleated to “change over” to snow. The term “change over” has recently been coined by The Weather Channel and other corporate/military/industrial complex weather agencies. A geoengineered snow event is generally called “heavy wet snow” (another recent term). This “snow” can begin to fall at temperatures far above freezing though the ongoing chemical process eventually cools the surrounding air mass. The resulting “snow” and “ice” can sometimes remain a surprisingly long time in spite of warmer temperatures, a result of artificial chemical nucleation.'

 

'In the case of cloud seeding to produce rain, if they succeed, then that moisture will not end up where it would have otherwise gone. In the case of saturation spraying that is known to diminish rain by scattering it into massive artificial cloud cover, where will all that moisture end up? Coming down somewhere else in a deluge? Is this perhaps why the US is locked in record drought and England is having record rains?'

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What Typhoon Haiyan Means For Climate Change — And The UN’s Ongoing Climate Talks

What Typhoon Haiyan Means For Climate Change — And The UN’s Ongoing Climate Talks | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
With winds as high as 235 mph, Super Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines became possibly the most powerful storm ever recorded.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Though hurricanes very rarely threaten California, a coincidence of conditions may might see such a hurricane make landfall - and be a 500-year catastrophic event:

'“Once [cyclones] do form, they get most of their energy from the surface waters of the ocean,” Professor Steffen said. “We know sea-surface temperatures are warming pretty much around the planet, so that’s a pretty direct influence of climate change on the nature of the storm.”

Data compiled from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows sea temperatures were about 0.5 to 1 degree above normal in the waters to the east of the Philippines as Haiyan began forming.

Kerry A. Emanuel, an atmospheric scientist at M.I.T., told the New York Times that that as the planet warms the difference between sea and air temperatures increases and that this differences fuels the increased intensity of storms like Haiyan.

“As you warm the climate, you basically raise the speed limit on hurricanes,” he said.'

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Cloud seeding, no longer magical thinking, is poised for use this winter - The Sacramento Bee

Cloud seeding, no longer magical thinking, is poised for use this winter - The Sacramento Bee | California's reliance on cloud seeding to produce rain and snow is stealing water | Scoop.it
As California concludes a second drought year and water managers hope eagerly to avoid a third, utilities across the state are poised for that first mass of pillowy gray clouds to drift ashore from the Pacific Ocean.
Jack Lindblad's insight:

Determining cloud seeding efficacy is quixotic:

'But how much extra water does cloud seeding generate, really? That is a subject of debate, and difficult to determine scientifically. The Desert Research Institute has studied the question for decades and determined that cloud seeding can produce an increase in snowpack from 8 percent to 15 percent, usually for a cost between $10 and $13 per acre-foot. In its report this year, the California Department of Water Resources estimated an average snowpack increase of 4 percent.

McFadden said SMUD needs only a 1.5 percent boost to make cloud seeding worthwhile, when compared to the cost to purchase electricity from any other source. But, McFadden conceded, “There’s no way to exactly, definitely measure how much more snowfall we get. That’s the pickle we’re put in.”'

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