Calculated bodies
805 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from healthcare technology
Scoop.it!

E-health made easier – and more comfortable

E-health made easier – and more comfortable | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it

The future of health care could be found in a tiny, paper-thin skin patch that collects vital information. The Bio-patch sensor developed by researchers at KTH Royal Institute of Technology is inexpensive, versatile and, best of all, comfortable to wear.

 

Geng Yang, a researcher at JRC iPack centre at KTH, says that the Bio-patch measures bioelectrical signals through the skin, gathering data on different parts of the body depending on where it is placed.

 

“On the chest it provides electrocardiography (ECG), on the skull it measures brainwaves (EEC), and on the forearm it can measure muscle response to stimulation from the nervous system (EMG),” he says. It also has a built-in sensor that constantly monitors body temperature.

 

With a wireless connection, the patient can analyse the readings in their smartphone, or send the data via internet to a healthcare professional for diagnosis.

 

The thinking behind Bio-patch is that health care can be moved out of the hospitals and into the home, Yang says. “Bio-patch is a step towards what is known as self-care, which is valuable especially for patients discharged after an operation, or for the elderly living unassisted,” he says.

 

Bio-patch has resulted in several publications in prestigious scientific journals and successful development of a prototype. Yang says several companies have already shown interest in the product.

  


Via nrip
more...
eMedToday's curator insight, June 27, 2013 8:50 PM

This type of sensor can be used in small telemedicine cubicles to send vital data to a HCP

eHWS's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:56 AM

We started with mobile monitoring - 40 years ago!

Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

A Pill that tracks your core body temperature using bluetooth technology and ... - WWSB ABC 7

A Pill that tracks your core body temperature using bluetooth technology and ... - WWSB ABC 7 | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
A Pill that tracks your core body temperature using bluetooth technology and ...
WWSB ABC 7
Swallow this with a glass of water, wait six hours then use your smart phone to track your body temperature.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Biidaajimowin Baakiiginigan
Scoop.it!

Minorities more likely to live in 'urban heat islands,' study finds

Minorities more likely to live in 'urban heat islands,' study finds | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Blacks, Asians and Latinos are more likely to live in “urban heat islands” that are most at risk during extreme heat waves that are expected to worsen due to climate change, according to a new study.

Via Robert DesJarlait
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Welfare, Disability, Politics and People's Right's
Scoop.it!

Nurses, care workers and others on night shifts could face 'double risk of breast cancer' - Telegraph

Nurses, care workers and others on night shifts could face 'double risk of breast cancer' - Telegraph | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Working night shifts for long periods of time could double women's risk of developing breast cancer, a study has found.

Via britishroses
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Futurity.org – Genetic 'typos' linked to testicular cancer

Futurity.org – Genetic 'typos' linked to testicular cancer | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
U. PENNSYLVANIA (US) — A study looking at the genomes of more than 13,000 men identified four new genetic variants associated with an increased risk of testicular cancer, the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer in ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

China Struggles With Organ Donor Card Due To Cultural Values - Medical Daily

China Struggles With Organ Donor Card Due To Cultural Values - Medical Daily | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Medical Daily
China Struggles With Organ Donor Card Due To Cultural Values
Medical Daily
The morality of organ transplantation practices in China has been long debated, given the frequent use of organs from executed death row inmates.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

How Cheap Genetic Testing Complicates Cancer Screening For Us ...

How Cheap Genetic Testing Complicates Cancer Screening For Us ... | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Sometimes, more medical information is a bad thing. The influential United States Preventive Services Task Force recommends against most women getting genetic..
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from (I+D)+(i+c): Gamification, Game-Based Learning (GBL)
Scoop.it!

24 Questions That Test Your Mental Agility - Edudemic

24 Questions That Test Your Mental Agility - Edudemic | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
This is a test of your mental flexibility and mental agility (not your IQ or math talent) found via NIH.gov that I thought the brilliant readers of Edudemic should attempt.

Via ThePinkSalmon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

A little brain training goes a long way - Nature.com

A little brain training goes a long way - Nature.com | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Nature.com
A little brain training goes a long way
Nature.com
A control group worked on computerized crossword puzzles for 10 hours on site.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Huggies app tweets when your baby has a wet diaper - The Denver Channel

Huggies app tweets when your baby has a wet diaper - The Denver Channel | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
The Denver Channel
Huggies app tweets when your baby has a wet diaper
The Denver Channel
Huggies has just launched a new gadget and smartphone app called the Huggies TweetPee. The app tweets ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Dementia diagnosis rates: 'Shockingly low' - BBC News

Dementia diagnosis rates: 'Shockingly low' - BBC News | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
BBC News
Dementia diagnosis rates: 'Shockingly low'
BBC News
Currently fewer than half of people with dementia have a diagnosis. A senior adviser on public health says dementia cases could be halved if more were done on prevention.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Longevity science
Scoop.it!

Extracting human DNA with full genetic data in minutes | KurzweilAI

Extracting human DNA with full genetic data in minutes | KurzweilAI | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it

University of Washington engineers and NanoFacture, a Bellevue, Wash., company, have created a device that can extract human DNA from fluid samples in a simpler, more efficient and environmentally friendly way than conventional methods.

The device will give hospitals and research labs a much easier way to separate DNA from human fluid samples, which will help with genome sequencing, disease diagnosis and forensic investigations.

 

 


Via Ray and Terry's
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Holistic Health and Wellness - Achieving your optimal
Scoop.it!

Apps, gadgets and social media pumping up fitness

Apps, gadgets and social media pumping up fitness | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Whitney Shaw is training for a marathon — and her friends know every single detail (Apps, gadgets and social media pumping up fitness http://t.co/zzBrbFuXkM #in)...

Via Nikki Patton
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

H2Flow Jacket Controls Your Body Temperature - Gadget Review

H2Flow Jacket Controls Your Body Temperature - Gadget Review | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Gadget Review
H2Flow Jacket Controls Your Body Temperature
Gadget Review
If you live somewhere that “enjoys” cold temperatures, you're probably aware of the relative crudeness of the standard jacket when it comes to temperature control.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Met Office puts UK on heatwave alert as temperatures soar to 32C - The Guardian

Met Office puts UK on heatwave alert as temperatures soar to 32C - The Guardian | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
The Guardian Met Office puts UK on heatwave alert as temperatures soar to 32C The Guardian Parts of Britain have been issued with an official level-three heatwave alert, one below the highest classification of emergency, as health officials sounded...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Area Fertility Expert Has High Hopes For New In Vitro Embryo-Screening Tests - CBS Local

Area Fertility Expert Has High Hopes For New In Vitro Embryo-Screening Tests - CBS Local | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Area Fertility Expert Has High Hopes For New In Vitro Embryo-Screening Tests
CBS Local
PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A new screening method for embryos during in vitro fertilization could dramatically increase success rates.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Minority children less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD

Minority children less likely to be diagnosed with ADHD | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Minority children are far less likely than their white counterparts to be diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a new study in this week's journal Pediatrics.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Bionimbus Applies Cloud Power to Genetic Data-Crunching » Data ...

Bionimbus Applies Cloud Power to Genetic Data-Crunching » Data ... | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
An ambitious project at the University of Chicago aims to lead the nation in biomedical computation, by making the region the largest hub in the world for genetic and medical information. At the forefront of the effort is ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Genomic data keep growing, but what do we really know?

Genomic data keep growing, but what do we really know? | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it

"We live in the post-genomic era, when DNA sequence data is growing exponentially", says Miami University (Ohio) computational biologist Iddo Friedberg. "But for most of the genes that we identify, we have no idea of their biological functions. They are like words in a foreign language, waiting to be deciphered." Understanding the function of genes is a problem that has emerged at the forefront of molecular biology. Many groups develop and employ sophisticated algorithms to decipher these "words". However, until now there was no comprehensive picture of how well these methods perform, "To use the information in our genes to our advantage, we first need to take stock of how well we are doing in interpreting these data".

 

To do so, Friedberg and his colleagues, Predrag Radivojac, of Indiana University, Bloomington IN and Sean Mooney, Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato CA organized the Critical Assessment of protein Function Annotation, or CAFA. CAFA is a community-wide experiment to assess the performance of the many methods used today to predict the functions of proteins, the workhorses of the cell coded by our genes.

 

Thirty research groups comprising 102 scientists and students participated in CAFA, presented a total of 54 methods. The participating groups came from leading universities in North America, Europe, Asia and Australia. The groups participated in blind-test experiments in which they predicted the function of protein sequences for which the functions are already known but haven't yet been made publicly available. Independent assessors then judged their performance.

 

The results are published in this month's issue of Nature Methods co-authored by members of all the participating groups, with Friedberg and Radivojac as lead authors. Fifteen companion papers have been published in a special issue of BMC Bioinformatics detailing the methods

"We have discovered a great enthusiasm and community spirit", said Friedberg, who since 2005 has been organizing Automated Function Prediction (AFP) meetings internationally. This, despite the competitive environment in which research groups want their methods to perform better than their peers' methods. Overall, throughout CAFA there was a highly collegial spirit, and a willingness to share information and science. "Everyone recognized that this is an important endeavor, and that only by a group effort can we move the field forward and learn to harness the deluge of genomic data, turning it into useful information."

 

"For the first time we have broad insight into what works, where improvement is needed, and how we should move the field forward. We will continue running CAFA in the future, as we are confident it will only help generate better methods to understand the information locked in our genomes, and those of other organisms," Friedberg said.

 

The initial analysis suggests that algorithms combining disparate prediction clues taken from different knowledge-bases provide more accurate predictions. The lead methods combined data from phylogenetic, gene-expression and protein-protein interaction data to provide predictions.

 

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Police retain DNA from thousands of children

Police retain DNA from thousands of children | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it

Some 120,000 gene samples taken in two years, as police forces argue they are acting within the law.

The DNA of thousands of innocent children is being taken by police and stored on the national database, campaigners say on Monday, citing new figures.

Police have taken the DNA of 120,000 children in the last two years, according to figures obtained by the Howard League for Penal Reform.

A total of 4,000 children under the age of 13 had their DNA taken in 2011. Police can take DNA from anyone arrested and store it on the database even if they are not charged or convicted of a criminal offence. The Howard League says the figures show a child's DNA is being taken by the police once every 10 minutes.

It says since most people arrested are not charged, it means the DNA of tens of thousands of innocent children is being stored on the national database every year.

Police do not challenge the figures but say they include children whose DNA has been taken when they are victims of crime, or to rule them out from crime scenes, as well as when they are arrested as suspects.

The figures were compiled from freedom of information requests sent to forces in England and Wales.

A total of 53,973 samples were taken from children aged 10-17 in 2011. In 2010 the figure was 69,796.

Children aged under 10 fall below the criminal age of responsibility. The figures do not distinguish between children arrested on suspicion of committing a crime and those who have had their DNA taken in other circumstances.

The figure for the taking of child DNA samples by police is expected to decline as new laws come in later this year tightening the rules on when police can retain DNA profiles from child suspects.

A total of 6 million people have their samples on the national DNA database, which is one of the largest in the world. Of those, 156,000 are children aged 17 or below, according to government figures. Altogether, 1.25m samples on the database were taken from people when they were children.

The FoI request asked forces "how many children aged 17 years and under had DNA samples taken by the police and stored in 2010 and 2011?"

Frances Crook, chief executive of the Howard League, said: "When public money is tight and police forces are shrinking, it is disappointing to see valuable crime-fighting resources being wasted on taking DNA samples from thousands of innocent children while serious offences go undetected.

"Children who get into trouble with the police are usually just up to mischief. Treating so many like hardened criminals by taking their DNA seems excessive.

"We welcome the government's decision to stop storing innocent people's DNA indefinitely, but it remains unclear how this will affect the number of children having their DNA taken needlessly."

Amanda Cooper, who leads on the DNA database for the Association of Chief Police Officers, said: "DNA may be taken from children in a number of circumstances with the intention of preventing or detecting crime.

"These may be when a child has been a victim of crime, when police would take DNA to confirm an incident took place and check whether it can be linked to a perpetrator.

"Others will be as part of criminal investigations where a child is the suspect. DNA samples are also taken to conduct criminal paternity tests as part of sexual offence investigations. The taking and retention of DNA from people of all ages is set out clearly under law."

The figures show four instances of police taking DNA of children below the age of criminal responsibility. One child was less than a year old; another was two. The forces concerned, Thames Valley, Avon and Somerset and Gloucestershire, say the samples were not taken because the children were suspected of crimes.

Stuart Jeffries, of Avon and Somerset CID, said: "We took DNA from a five-year-old girl because she was the victim of a serious sexual assault and we believed her sample would help us convict her attacker. The sample has been destroyed.

"We only take DNA from children under 10 in serious cases and only where they have been the victim."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Why diagnosing dementia could become that little bit easier - Channel 4 News (blog)

Why diagnosing dementia could become that little bit easier - Channel 4 News (blog) | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Channel 4 News (blog) Why diagnosing dementia could become that little bit easier Channel 4 News (blog) Diagnosing dementia is notoriously difficult – sometimes taking months, even years – and involves numerous visits to doctors, hospitals, blood...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Anne Kerr
Scoop.it!

Multiple genes contribute to the risk of developing bipolar disorder, study finds - Irish Times

Multiple genes contribute to the risk of developing bipolar disorder, study finds - Irish Times | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Irish Times Multiple genes contribute to the risk of developing bipolar disorder, study finds Irish Times The most likely scenario for predicative testing was the use of several individual risk genes or group of genes with an overall measurement of...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Disability Issues
Scoop.it!

Obesity poses 'dementia time bomb'

Obesity poses 'dementia time bomb' | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Ever-growing waistlines could fuel a big increase in the number of people with dementia in the future, researchers have warned.

Via Jane Young
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Anthropometry and Kinanthropometry
Scoop.it!

My, how they've grown

My, how they've grown | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
Thanks to improved diets and better living conditions, children and teens have steadily increased in size, generation by generation, but where will it all end?

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Anne Kerr from Anthropometry and Kinanthropometry
Scoop.it!

Twitter / LOcculta: Anthropometry on Inishbofin ...

Twitter / LOcculta: Anthropometry on Inishbofin ... | Calculated bodies | Scoop.it
RT @LOcculta: Anthropometry on Inishbofin island, 1892: http://t.co/096Kn1pETO

Via Peter Mellow
more...
No comment yet.